IgCC vs. LEED 2009

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  • Sheila Blake-City of Houston Code Administrator, -Formerly served on USGBC National Code Committee-Served on the IgCC Committee for ICC last round, not creation of the strategies but in refining them and focus on the adoption and implementation. Will cover adoption methods for various cities and states comparison of the IgCC to LEED v3 – 2009This is NOT a Pro and Con presentation. Rather, this is a comparison of credits between the rating system we have become familiar with to the new green code we are still learning about.
  • These 3 slides are from AIA for their continuing education system .This course was reviewed for the course credit but is not approved or endorsed by AIA in any way.
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  • The new 2012 International Green Construction Code is the next step in the evolution of green rating systems. As markets have transformed and some green building techniques and strategies are becoming standard practices, demand has grown for a single regulatory document that could be adopted by jurisdictions throughout the US. The International Code Council responded by developing the green code in partnership with the AIA and ASTM. The resulting publication provides a mandatory pathway which contains strategies familiar to users of the USGBC LEED rating system. This presentation will compare the LEED credits with IgCC to identify which credits are covered, or are not covered, and identify which are requirements or electives.IgCC requirements that are not in LEED will be identified as well.
  • So the first question one might ask is, “Why do we need a code?” And then, “What is the difference between a code or rating system” .The basic difference of course, is that a code whether IgCC or the building code, for example, is adopted into law by a jurisdiction and becomes mandatory for the types of projects that are listed by scope in the adopting legislation. As we will see that has varied widely from one place to the next and we will look at that in a moment.Codes are by nature prescriptive, being specific and detailed, so that they can be enforced while a rating system allows more flexibility as long as the goals and objectives are met.With a code you must meet all the mandatory requirements, whereas the project team can select the amount of credits to pursue with LEED to achieve the certification level they desire.And, the process for developing the document are different as codes are developed for the most part through a government consensus process that includes industry stakeholder participation, while LEED is mostly industry driven.
  • Generally the green code is adopted either as a mandatory code which is method that we are all familiar with, or as a voluntary code for early adopters to become familiar with the code and create markets for compliance.MANDATORYThe Fort Collins, Colo., Approved significant extractions from the IgCC and ICC 700, the National Green Building Standard, as part of green building code amendments to the city's building codes, effective in January 2012.The City of Dallas, TX adopted the IgCC in most part except for the commissioning chapter and existing buildings and sites chapters. The energy chapter will be replaced with the 2012 IECC. Adoption was delayed for a year to allow training and for gearing up for enforcement.
  • Jurisdiction Buildings: Floridahas adopted the IgCC as an option for the retrofitting and new construction of all state-owned facilities. The legislation specifically allows the IgCC to be used by the Department of Management Services and encourages state agencies to adopt the IgCC as a model green building code that will apply to buildings financed by the state. The state of Rhode IslandGreen Buildings Act identifies the IgCC as an equivalent standard for any publically funded facility to be designed and constructed as a green building. (It includes ANSI/ASHRAE/USGBC/IES Standard 189.1 as a jurisdictional compliance option.)Voluntary Green Codes: Early adopters gain familiarityBoynton Beachis the first city in Florida to adopt the IgCC as the core of its local voluntary green code. The PhoenixCity Council unanimously approved the adoption of the IgCC and ICC 700, the National Green Building Standard, for voluntary use. Richland, Wash., adopted the IgCC as a non-mandatory document for commercial buildings.Kayenta Township, Ariz., adopted IgCC Public Version 2.0 on a voluntary basis and may be incorporated into the community’s Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance.Partial Code:The North CarolinaBuilding Code Council adopted the Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems section of the IgCC Public Version1.0 with amendments, which enhance the North Carolina Plumbing Code Appendix on Rainwater. The 2011 Oregon Commercial Reach Code features energy-related provisions of the IgCC Public Version 2.0 with amendments. The Commercial Reach Code also incorporates components of the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC).Incentives:Scottsdale, Ariz., the IgCC replaced and updated the city’s voluntary commercial green-building program for commercial and multifamily buildings to pursue green development projects. Zoning tradeoffs like heights are granted. Keene, N.H., the IgCC is an “Allowable Green Building System” in the city’s Sustainable Energy Efficient Development zone, a voluntary urban incentive-based area that promotes green building and redevelopment in its downtown.State Listed for Jurisdictional Adoption:TheMarylandState Assembly adopted the IgCC as a non-mandatory document for local jurisdictions to apply to all commercial buildings and residential properties more than three-stories high.WASHINGTON, DC is going for a mandatory adoption. we hear.
  • For those who haven’t seen the IgCC, these are the chapters. If you are familiar with LEED this should look familiar as the major categories are the same. We still have sites, water, energy, materials, and indoor environmental quality.
  • And, the Appendices.
  • Here are some observations about the IgCC relative to LEED:Most of us are familiar with the standard LEED point system that has prerequisites and 100 credits plus the bonus credits. For example the New Construction rating system, used for the IgCC comparison, has 8 prerequisites that must be met and credits for the 5 standard categories plus 6 possible innovative and 4 regional credits.There is no point system in IgCC. There are mandatory requirements for all projects and the jurisdictional requirements from chapter 3 that become mandatory as well, once they’re adopted. The appendix project electives allow a design team to select from a list 44 electives across the 5 categories which is similar to the process of choosing LEED credits. This applies only if a minimum number of project electives are specified in the adopting legislation with the jurisdiction selecting a minimum number of electives to be achieved.LEED often sets targets with a list of methods that can be used, while IgCC usually details the methods that are required. Energy is one area where LEED sets a target percentage and IgCC determines the methods to achieve compliance. Same holds to some extent for water efficiency.Thresholds tend to be lower in IgCC, for example the heat island roof reflectance in LEED has the SRI set at 75 for low slope roofs and 29 for steep slope roofs. The IgCC sets those SRI as 60 for low slopes, and 25 for steep slopes. IgCC relies heavily on compliance plans. Plans that are required in the IgCC include: Soil and Water Quality Protection Plan Vegetation and Soil Protection Plan Predesign Site Inventory and Assessment Building Site Waste Plan Construction Material and Waste Management Plan Indoor Air Quality Management Plan
  • This graphic illustrates the differences between the IgCC and other green rating systems and standards. The IgCC is mostly mandatory criteria with some electives and ASHRAE 189 has no electives.The ICC 700 residential green code and LEED have a few pre-requisites and the rest are electives.- - - -NEXT:For the rest of this presentation I will be comparing LEED credits one by one, to the IgCC.The IgCC Sections are either shown as black text for mandatory provisions, or in red for the jurisdictional and project electives.You will see a gray box where there is no requirement in either the code or LEED to match up with requirements in the other document. Before we start how many think there are more provisions available in LEED? or the IgCC?
  • While many of the Sustainable Sites Credits you will see on the next few screens are covered in both LEED and the IgCC, Credit 1 for site location mostly appears under Jurisdictional Options that may or may not be selected by a given city or state, along with a couple that also have a Project Electives component.
  • The transportation credits are handled a little differently in the IgCC with bicycle changing and shower facilities having a 10,000 square feet trigger in the mandatory provisions and an elective for installing them in smaller buildings. Preferred parking is only addressed in the electives.The IgCC does not address public transportation at all.
  • And there are no requirements or electives for open green space.
  • On the other hand, IgCC specifically addresses soil in greater detail beyond LEED. There are rules for protecting topsoil, not allowing soil to be brought in from farms and green fields, ensuring soil restoration for vegetation, and using the best science when there are engineered soils.IgCC also adds a pedestrian-friendly component for access to the building entrance with a required walkway or bicycle path.
  • The water efficiency portions of IgCC get pretty detailed, even specifying limits of 0.1 gpm for the shower valves.
  • In some cases the water efficiency method is required only if available, such as you might find with a municipal reclaimed water system, or if allowed, gray water or rainwater collection systems ,which are not allowed in all localities. There are no Water Efficiency measures in LEED that are not covered by the IgCC in some way. Even if not mandatory, they occur as jurisdictional options or project electives.
  • Water Efficiency is one area where the IgCC gets very detailed about the methods to be used in the mandatory sections. These include leakage limits, maximum volume and shutoffs.The reuse of certain types of wastewater are spelled out in IgCC, such as for vehicle washing and pump water. These are all mandatory.
  • Further water saving measures address wastewater temperature, metering, and nonpotable water quality, as well as eliminating “once-through” use of water.The appendix chapter project electives specify use of nonpotable water for outdoor use, fire safety, industrial makeup water and cooling towers.
  • For energy efficiency the code has an entire commissioning chapter, the fundamental commissioning is mandatory, and each building system is addressed for achieving 2012 IECC plus an additional 10 percent in some cases.
  • Not only is the energy stepped up from the 2012 IECC / 2010 ASHRAE 90.1 for the basic systems, but a new term is introduced for the performance pathway. The zEPI or Zero Energy Performance Index is a comparison of the proposed building to other buildings of the same type in the same benchmark year.Renewables are required by the IgCC at minimum 2% for onsite generation or 4% for Renewable Energy Credits, or RECS.
  • Here are the increasing levels of on-site renewable energy beyond the mandatory levels that will either meet jurisdictional requirements if any are adopted, or project electives otherwise.
  • Metering and monitoring are mandatory in the IgCC so those systems are listed in chapter 6 for energy efficiency with references in chapter 7 for water efficiency and in chapter 10 for existing buildings.However, the IgCC adds process loads and plug loads and requires the different types of loads to be on different circuits so they can be metered.An additional requirement includes a display at the main entrance to each building.And the code even goes beyond the typical energy requirements to cover elevators, escalators, and conveyor for motors, friction, ventilation and lighting; as well as 50 percent of the commercial food service equipment for energy efficiency and water use.
  • Refrigerant management is not covered in the IGCC. It is not mandatory like the LEED Prerequisite, nor is it enhanced like LEED credit 4.
  • For Materials and Resources we see recycling and waste management are mandatory, but building reuse is an alternative only as a project elective.Here we see one of the many required plans is utilized for construction materials and waste management. The default is 50% minimum diversion for CD waste.However, LEED credits for reusing the building are not part of the IgCC.
  • In a slightly different twist IgCC sets an aggregate mandatory target of 55% (based on mass, volume, or cost) for 5 types of materials in any combination. An alternative option is provided for doing a whole building life cycle assessment. So either the material types must be selected, or the LCA provided.The 5 types are: used materials, recycled content, recyclable components, bio-based and indigenous.
  • There are provisions for protecting materials on site during construction.IgCC has mandatory limits on CFL mercury levels and commissioning for moisture prevention components.Finally, a building service life plan will receive project elective credit, and another project elective can be met with a plan for deconstruction and reuse for 80% of the building.
  • The last category for IEQ has several familiar requirements in the mandatory provisions of the IgCC. The prerequisites for ventilation are met to some extent with the overlay of the International Mechanical Code. Tobacco smoke is prohibited. MERV filters are required. And the low-emitting materials covered by LEED are addressed.The flush-out or testing option is now a jurisdictional option.LEED credits that are not covered are outdoor air monitoring, increased ventilation,.
  • The IgCC also covers the copy/print room separation, thermal comfort and daylighting.However, views are now a project elective.LEED credits that are not covered are controls for lighting and thermal comfort as well as thermal comfort verification which of course if difficult to assess post occupancy.Items spelled out in IgCC that go beyond LEED are specifics for fireplaces and ceiling and wall system emissions. Although it is not spelled out clearly in LEED, fireplaces are required to be sealed. Consideration for project electives are available if all floors, walls and ceilings are certain materials or where the these materials plus the adhesive, paints and coatings achieve a Total VOC limit for 50% of all the materials that can be documented.The jurisdiction also has the ability to set acoustic sound levels limits and testing that apply to indoor and outdoor sources, building assembly emissions including an overall VOC limit.
  • Since this was a quick half presentation there is no time for a comparative case study as we had hoped.Any questions?
  • IgCC vs. LEED 2009

    1. 1. Sheila Blake, MBA, CBO, LEED AP BD+C PWE Code Enforcement City of Houston Comparison of the 2012 IgCC to LEED 2009 Gulf Coast Green May 2, 2013
    2. 2.  City of Houston is a Registered Provider with The American Institute of Architects Continuing Education Systems (AIA/CES). Credit(s) earned on completion of this program will be reported to AIA/CES for AIA members. Certificates of Completion for both AIA members and non-AIA members are available upon request. This program is registered with AIA/CES for continuing professional education. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by the AIA of any material of construction or any method or manner of handling, using, distributing, or dealing in any material or product.  Questions related to specific materials, methods, and services will be addressed at the conclusion of this presentation.. AIA/CES Credits 2
    3. 3. AIA Course Description In October 2010, the AIA/CES system was updated with the new CES Discovery system, in that time we have transferred more than one million records. This new update has made it necessary to remind us of the AIA/CES policies and procedures, to introduce the “new” provider ethics, and to reintroduce the AIA/CES audits/quality assurance program. This presentation covers those areas giving providers the opportunity to give feedback and input. 3
    4. 4. AIA Learning Objectives At the end of this program, participants will be able to: 1. Explore the differences between the IgCC and LEED 2. Identify LEED credits that contribute to IgCC compliance for projects to obtain approval for both LEED and IgCC. 3. Discuss the opportunities to implement the IgCC as a voluntary program or as a locally approved practice. 4. Distinguish the advantages and disadvantages of rating systems and codes under different conditions. 4
    5. 5. The International Green Construction Code when adopted by a jurisdiction requires compliance with minimum sustainability requirements for new and altered buildings. This session explores the relationship with LEED programs and examples of implementation of the code in order to put this new code into a framework that is more easily referenced and therefore understood and implemented. 2012 IGCC Comparison to LEED v3 5
    6. 6. IgCC LEED Mandatory Voluntary Enforceable – More Prescriptive More Performance All or Nothing Compliance Levels for Ranking Governmental with Industry Industry Committees Final vote by govt members and Comments Final vote by full membership Advantages and Disadvantages 6
    7. 7. FORT COLLINS, CO Extracted portions for water and . DALLAS Passed Sept 2012, takes effect Sept 2013 Amended out energy, commissioning, existing bldgs IgCC Methods of Adoption – Mandatory 7
    8. 8.  FLORIDA  MARYLAND  OREGON*  N. CAROLINA*  S. CAROLINA  RHODE ISLAND *partial adoption  Boynton Beach, FL  Boulder, CO  Carbondale, CO  Kayenta, AZ  Keene, NH  Phoenix, AZ  Richland, WA  Scottsdale, AZ IgCC Methods of Adoption – Voluntary 8
    9. 9. 9 1: Scope and Administration 2: Definitions 3: Jurisdictional Requirements and Life Cycle Assessment 4: Site Development and Land Use 5: Material Resource Conservation and Efficiency 6: Energy Conservation and CO23 Emission Reduction 7: Water Resource Conservation, Quality and Efficiency 8: Indoor Environmental Quality and Comfort 9: Commissioning, Operation and Maintenance 10: Existing Buildings 11: Existing Building Site Development 12: Referenced Standards IgCC Chapters
    10. 10. 10 A: Project Electives B: Radon Mitigation C: Optional Ordinance D: Alternative Enforcement Procedures IgCC Appendices
    11. 11.  LEED has mandatory prerequisites and optional credits, while IgCC has mandatory requirements (some jurisdictional) and project electives  LEED has percentage targets with list of available methods to comply, while IgCC prescribes methods.  IgCC threshold levels tend to be lower.  IgCC requires a variety of plans for compliance IGCC v LEED – General 11
    12. 12. Mandatory vs. Elective Provisions 12
    13. 13. IGCC v LEED – Sustainable Sites 13 LEED Sustainable Sites IgCC Sustainable Sites Prereq 1 Construction Activity Pollution Prevention 405.1 Soil and Water Quality Protection Plan Credit 1 Site Selection: Prime Farmland 402.7 Building prohibited on land zoned agricultural. (Jurisdictional) Credit 1 Site Selection: Floodplain 402.2.3 1 foot freeboard in flood hazard area 402.2.1 and 402.2.2 Flood Hazard Area Preservation - General / Specific -Prohibited in Flood areas with 1% risk or as designated on map. (Jurisdictional) A104.1 Buildings moved, higher freeboard, or substantial improvement at 40%. (Project Elective) Credit 1 Site Selection: Threatened Species Habitat 402.5 No development within 50 feet of designated conservation area. (Jurisdictional) A104.5 Habitat Restoration. (Project Elective) Credit 1 Site Selection: Wetland 402.3 Building prohibited in, over or within water or buffer. (Jurisdictional) Credit 1 Site Selection: Water Body 402.4 Building prohibited in wetland or within buffer. (Jurisdictional) Credit 1 Site Selection: Parkland 402.6 Development prohibited in public park. (Jurisdictional)
    14. 14. IGCC v LEED – Sustainable Sites 14 LEED Sustainable Sites IgCC Sustainable Sites Credit 2 Development Density & Community Connectivity 402.8 Greenfield development prohibition. (Jurisdictional) A104.3 Infill development. (Project Elective) Credit 3 Brownfield Redevelopment A104.4 Brownfield redevelopment. (Project Elective) Credit 4.1 Alternative Transportation: Public Transportation Access Credit 4.2 Alternative Transportation: Bicycle Storage & Changing Rooms 407.1 Walkways and bicycle paths 407.2 Bicycle changing and shower facilities > 10,000 square feet. 1104.2 Building site improvements. A104.7 Changing and shower facilities <10,000 square feet. (Project Elective) A104.8 Long term bicycle storage. (Project Elective) Credit 4.3 Alternative Transportation: Low-Emitting and Fuel Efficient Vehicles 407.4.2 Low emission, hybrid and electric vehicle parking. (Jurisdictional) Credit 4.4 Alternative Transportation: Parking Capacity 407.4.1 High Occupancy Vehicle parking. (Jurisdictional)
    15. 15. IGCC v LEED – Sustainable Sites 15 LEED Sustainable Sites IgCC Sustainable Sites Credit 5.1 Site Development: Protect or Restore Habitat 402.8.1 Limits on depth of disturbance beyond building, hardscape and construction staging area. 405.2 Vegetation and Soil Protection Plan (existing vegetation, map, barriers, perimeter distance, methods, tree protection zone) 402.8 Greenfields prohibition unless infill development. (Jurisdictional) Credit 5.2 Site Development: Maximize Open Space Credit 6.1 Stormwater Management: Quantity Control 403.1.1 Retain 95th percentile of runoff or restore predevelopment hydrology Credit 6.2 Stormwater Management: Quality Control 403.1.3 / 403.2 Prohibit brownfield infiltration and use of coal tar sealants Credit 7.1 Heat Island Effect: Non-Roof 408.2 Site Hardscape 408.3 Shading by trees 1103.2 Changes to Hardscape and surface vehicle parking A104.9 Heat Island 75%, 100%, in zones 1-6, 50% in zone 7-8. (Project Elective)
    16. 16. IGCC v LEED – Sustainable Sites 16 LEED Sustainable Sites IgCC Sustainable Sites Credit 7.2 Heat Island Effect: Roof 408.3 Roof surfaces: 75% cool roof or vegetative in zones 1-3. A104.9 Heat Island cool roof zones 4-8. (Project Elective) Credit 8 Light Pollution Reduction 409.1 Light Pollution control for uplight, light trespass and glare. (Jurisdictional) 401.2 Predesign Site Inventory and Assessment 405.1.2 Topsoil Protection 405.1.3 Imported soils not mined from farmland and greenfield sites 405.1.4 Soil reuse and restoration for vegetation 405.1.5 Engineered growing media If used must use best available science A104.2 Wildlife Corridor (Project Elective) A104.6 Mixed Use Development (Project Elective)
    17. 17. IGCC v LEED – Water Efficiency LEED Water Efficiency IgCC Water Efficiency Prereq 1 Water Use Reduction (20%) Table 702.1 Minimum Fixture flow rates (shower, lavatory faucet, bar sink, kitchen faucet, urinal, water closet, food establishment prerinse spray valve, drinking fountain). 702.2 Combination tub and shower valves – leakage limited to 0.1 gpm. 702.4 Drinking fountain controls - Auto shutoff or metered flows Credit 1.1 Water Efficient Landscaping (50% red) 404.1 Landscape irrigation systems - reduce potable by 50% 404.1.2 No irrigation runoff, weather controls, plant needs, pressure regulators, sprinkler limits 404.2 Outdoor fountains must use nonpotable or alternate sources unless < 100 gallons or < 20 sq. ft. water surface, recirculate and reuse water, and have nonpotable signage (where available) 405.3 Native plant landscaping 17
    18. 18. IGCC v LEED – Water Efficiency LEED Water Efficiency IgCC Water Efficiency Credit 1.2 Water Efficient Landscaping (100% red) 404.1 Landscape irrigation systems 405.3 Native plant landscaping Credit 2 Innovative Wastewater Technologies 710 Alternate onsite nonpotable water sources. 702.5 Nonwater urinal drainage connection downstream from water using fixtures. 707 Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems 708 Gray Water Systems 709 Reclaimed Water systems A107.2 Onsite waste water treatment (Project Elective) A107.4 Onsite nonpotable water for plumbing fixture flushing. (Project Elective) A107.9 Gray water collection. (Project Elective) Credit 3.1 Water Use Reduction (30%) 702 Fixtures, fittings, equipment and appliances Credit 3.2 Water Use Reduction (35%) 702 Fixtures, fittings, equipment and appliances Credit 3.3 Water Use Reduction (40%) 702 Fixtures, fittings, equipment and appliances 702.4 Drinking fountain controls - Auto shutoff or metered flows 702.6 Appliances (Energy Star clothes washer, ice maker, dishwasher) 702.7 Municipal reclaimed water (Jurisdictional) 18
    19. 19. LEED Water Efficiency IgCC Water Efficiency 702.8 Efficient hot and tempered water distribution. Max pipe length and volume 702.9 Trap priming water - nonpotable and non-continuous, max 30 gallons per year 702.10 Water-powered pumps not allowed as primary means to remove ground water from sump 702.11 Food service hand washing faucets auto shutoff 702.12 Dipper wells - shutoff and flow valve to max 1 gpm 702.13 Automated vehicle wash facilities - reuse 50% rinse water, max 40 gal/vehicle bay or 35 gal/veh conveyor 702.14 Self-service vehicle wash facilities - spray wand maximum 3 gpm and faucets self-closing 702.15 Vehicle washing facilities - reverse osmosis waste water to be used for washing 702.16 Food waste disposers - load sensing for max 1 gpm at no-load, and 8 gpm for full-load 702.17 Combination ovens - max 3.5 gal/hour per steamer pan 702.18 Autoclaves and sterilizers - nonpotable if water tempered. Vacuum type not allowed for venturi-type water use 702.19 Liquid ring vacuum pumps - reuse water unless hazardous 702.20 Film processors - water reuse if water cooled processors 703.1 Hydronic closed loop systems and equipment – nonpotable makeup water 703.2 Humidity lock-out > 55 percent 703.3 Tempering water nonpotable unless flow limit for 140 degree max and < 200 gal/day Water Efficiency IGCC ONLY 19
    20. 20. LEED Water Efficiency IgCC Water Efficiency 703.4 Condensate must be captured and reused or credit to sanitary return where credit exists 703.5 Heat Exchangers - once through cooling prohibited 703.6 Dehumidifiers must be captured where system exists 703.7 Cooling towers, evaporative condensers and fluid coolers - prohibit once through cooling, limit drift losses 703.9 Evaporative cooling < 4 gal/ton-hour cooling capacity, pump shut-off, timer or sensor. Discharge water reused. 704.1 Water treatment devices and equipment - demand initiated regeneration controls, max 5 gal/1000 grains removed. 705 Metering - different sources of water and different consumption types shall be metered (tenant, irrigation, cooling towers, industrial processes…) 706 Nonpotable water requirements - signage and quality A107.3 Onsite nonpotable water for outdoor hose connections. (Project Elective) A107.5 Onsite nonpotable water for fire sprinkler systems (Project Elective) A107.6 Onsite nonpotable water for fire pumps. (Project Elective) A107.7 Onsite nonpotable water for industrial process makeup water (Project Elective) A107.8 Onsite nonpotable water for cooling tower makeup water. (Project Elective) Water Efficiency IGCC ONLY 20
    21. 21. IGCC v LEED – Energy and Atmosphere LEED Energy Efficiency IgCC Energy Efficiency Prereq 1 Fundamental Commissioning of the Building Energy Systems 611 Energy systems commissioning and completion 902 Approved agency 903 Commissioning Prereq 2 Minimum Energy Performance 602 Modeled performance pathway requirements - or - 605 Building Envelope Systems per IECC plus. 606 Building Mechanical Systems per IECC plus 607 Building Service WH Systems per IECC plus 608 Building Electrical Power and Lighting Systems per IECC, - plus - 1003.2.2 Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning 1003.2.3 Service Water Systems 1003.2.6 Insulation of unconditioned attic 1003.2.7 Roof replacement insulation Prereq 3 Fundamental Refrigerant Management 21
    22. 22. IGCC v LEED – Energy and Atmosphere LEED Energy Efficiency IgCC Energy Efficiency Credit 1 Optimize Energy Performance 602 Modeled performance pathway requirements 1003.2.2 Heating, ventilating and air-conditioning 1003.2.3 Service Water Systems 1003.2.6 Insulation of unconditioned attics 1003.2.7 Roof replacement insulation 602.1 Performance based zEPI <= 46 and Indirect CO2 emissions. (Jurisdictional) A106.1 Performance path - higher zEPI levels for up to 10 Elective (Project Elective) A106.2 Prescriptive path - 10% more efficient Mechanical heating and cooling plus. (Project Elective) A106.3 Prescriptive path - service WH 10% more efficient in certain occupancies. (Project Elective) A106.4 Prescriptive path - Lighting with indoor and outdoor 10% less energy (Jurisdictional Elective) A106.5 Performance path - 40% reduced energy passive design. (Jurisdictional Elective) Credit 2.1 On-Site Renewable Energy (1%) 610 Building Energy Renewable Energy Systems - REQUIRED for 2 percent of building and site energy, or 4% RECs. Solar and Wind at 2% or Solar Water Heating at 10% hot water energy usage 22
    23. 23. IGCC v LEED – Energy and Atmosphere LEED Energy Efficiency IgCC Energy Efficiency Credit 2.2 On-Site Renewable Energy (3%) 610 Building Renewable energy systems. (Jurisdictional) Credit 2.3 On-Site Renewable Energy (5%) 610 Building Renewable energy systems. (Jurisdictional) A106.6 Renewable Energy 5% (Project Elective) Credit 2.4 On-Site Renewable Energy (7%) 610 Building Renewable energy systems. (Jurisdictional) A106.6 Renewable Energy 5% (Project Elective) Credit 2.5 On-Site Renewable Energy (9%) 610 Building Renewable energy systems. (Jurisdictional) A106.6 Renewable Energy 5% (Project Elective) Credit 2.6 On-Site Renewable Energy (11%) 610 Building Renewable energy systems. (Jurisdictional) A106.6 Renewable Energy 10% (Project Elective) Credit 2.7 On-Site Renewable Energy (13%) 610 Building Renewable energy systems. (Jurisdictional) A106.6 Renewable Energy 20% (Project Elective) Credit 3 Enhanced Commissioning 611 Energy Systems Commissioning per IECC in 60 days, Post-occupancy recommissioning in 18-24 months from Certificate of Occupancy 902 Approved Agency 903 Commissioning Credit 4 Enhanced Refrigerant Management 23
    24. 24. IGCC v LEED – Energy and Atmosphere LEED Energy Efficiency IgCC Energy Efficiency Credit 5 Measurement & Verification 603 Energy metering, monitoring and reporting – all forms of energy delivered, produced, and used. 603.5 Sub-meters, 36 month data and annual emissions 610.5 Renewable energy system performance monitoring and metering 705 Metering 1003.2.1 Metering devices Credit 6 Green Power 610.1 Renewable energy systems requirements – allows RECs 602.2 Annual Direct / Indirect CO2e emissions. (Jurisdictional) 603.2 Energy distribution design requirements and load type isolation in buildings - circuit = 1 type of energy. Includes plug and process loads 603.4 Energy load type sub-metering - installed when > 25,000 sq. Ft. or future capability 603.6 Energy Display at main bldg entrance 604 Automated demand-response (AUTO-DR) infrastructure. (Jurisdictional) 609 Specific appliances and equipment -elevators, escalators, conveyors and commercial food service equipment. 24
    25. 25. IGCC v LEED – Energy and Atmosphere LEED Energy Efficiency IgCC Energy Efficiency Prereq 1 Fundamental Commissioning of the Building Energy Systems 611 Energy systems commissioning and completion 902 Approved agency 903 Commissioning Prereq 2 Minimum Energy Performance 602 Modeled performance pathway requirements - or - 605 Building Envelope Systems per IECC plus. 606 Building Mechanical Systems per IECC plus 607 Building Service WH Systems per IECC plus 608 Building Electrical Power and Lighting Systems per IECC, - plus - 1003.2.2 Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning 1003.2.3 Service Water Systems 1003.2.6 Insulation of unconditioned attic 1003.2.7 Roof replacement insulation Prereq 3 Fundamental Refrigerant Management 25
    26. 26. IGCC v LEED–Materials and Resources LEED Materials and Resources IgCC Materials and Resources Prereq 1 Storage & Collection of Recyclables 504 Waste Management and Recycling 505.2.3 Recyclable building materials and building components Credit 1.1 Building Reuse - Walls, Floors, Roof (55%) A105.6 Building Reuse of Core and Shell 75% (Project Elective) A105.7 Historic Reuse 75% (Project Elective) Credit 1.1 Building Reuse - Walls, Floors, Roof (75%) A105.6 Building Reuse of Core and Shell 75% (Project Elective) A105.7 Historic Reuse 75% (Project Elective) Credit 1.1 Building Reuse - Walls, Floors, Roof (95%) Credit 1.2 Building Reuse - Interior Non-Structural (50%) Credit 2.1 Construction Waste Management (50% diversion) 406 Building Site waste Management (includes land clearing debris and excavated soils min 75%) 503.1 Construction Material and Waste Management Plan 503.1 Additional Percentage Determined by Jurisdiction. (Jurisdictional) A105.1 Add 20% diversion (Project Elective) A105.2 Max 4 lb / square foot construction waste (Project Elective) 26
    27. 27. IGCC v LEED–Materials and Resources LEED Materials and Resources IgCC Materials and Resources Credit 2.2 Construction Waste Management (75% diversion) 406 Building Site waste Management (includes land clearing debris and excavated soils min 75%) 503.1 Additional Percentage Determined by Jurisdiction. (Jurisdictional) Credit 3.1 Resource Reuse (5%) 505.2.1 Used Materials and Components A105.3 Aggregate materials 70% A105.3 Aggregate materials 85% (Project Elective) Credit 3.2 Resource Reuse (10%) 505.2.1 Used Materials and Components A105.3 Aggregate materials 70% A105.3 Aggregate materials 85% (Project Elective) Credit 4.1 Recycled Content (10%) 505.2.2 Recycled Content Building Materials (25%) A105.3 Aggregate materials 70% A105.3 Aggregate materials 85% (Project Elective) Credit 4.2 Recycled Content (20%) 505.2.2 Recycled Content Building Materials (50%) A105.3 Aggregate materials 70% A105.3 Aggregate materials 85% (Project Elective) Credit 5.1 Regional Materials (10%) 505.2.5 Indigenous Materials A105.3 Aggregate materials 70% A105.3 Aggregate materials 85% (Project Elective) 27
    28. 28. IGCC v LEED–Materials and Resources LEED Materials and Resources IgCC Materials and Resources Credit 5.2 Regional Materials (20%) 505.2.5 Indigenous Materials A105.3 Aggregate materials 70% A105.3 Aggregate materials 85% (Project Elective) Credit 6 Rapidly Renewable Materials 505.2.4 Bio-based materials A105.3 Aggregate materials 70% A105.3 Aggregate materials 85% (Project Elective) Credit 7 Certified Wood 505.2.4 Bio-based materials A105.3 Aggregate materials 70% A105.3 Aggregate materials 85% (Project Elective) 502.1 Construction material management – construction phase - storage and handling per manufacturer; moisture control. 506 Lamps - mercury limits 5-8 milligrams 507 Building envelope moisture control – commissioning of moisture prevention strategies A105.4 Building Service Life Plan for length of building life, operations and maintenance, and replacement. (Project Elective) A105.5 Deconstruction and Reuse of 90% of building. (Project Elective) 28
    29. 29. IGCC v LEED – Indoor Environmental Quality LEED Indoor Environmental Quality IgCC Indoor Environmental Quality Prereq 1 Minimum IAQ Performance International Mechanical Code - Overlay Prereq 2 Environmental Tobacco Smoke Control 803.3 Environmental Tobacco Smoke Control Credit 1 Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring Credit 2 Increased Ventilation Credit 3.1 Construction IAQ Management Plan: During Construction 502.1 Construction Material Management 801.2 Indoor air quality management plan required. 803.1 Construction phase requirements – Construction Ventilation (MERV 8) Credit 3.2 Construction IAQ Management Plan: Before Occupancy 801.2 Indoor air quality management plan required 804.2 Post-construction, pre-occupancy baseline IAQ testing. (Jurisdictional) Credit 4.1 Low-Emitting Materials: Adhesives and Sealants 805 Prohibited materials 806.2 Adhesives and sealants Credit 4.2 Low-Emitting Materials: Paints and Coatings 805 Prohibited materials 806.3 Architectural paints and coatings Credit 4.3 Low-Emitting Materials: Flooring Systems 805 Prohibited materials 806.4 Flooring A108.2 All flooring meets VOC emission limits. (Project Elective) 29
    30. 30. IGCC v LEED – Indoor Environmental Quality LEED Indoor Environmental Quality IgCC Indoor Environmental Quality Credit 4.4 Low-Emitting Materials: Composite Wood & Agrifiber 805 Prohibited materials 806.1 Emissions from composite wood products Credit 5 Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control 803.4 Isolation of pollutant sources 803.5 Filters Credit 6.1 Controllability of Systems: Lighting Credit 6.2 Controllability of systems: Thermal Comfort Credit 7.1 Thermal Comfort: Design 803.2 Thermal environmental conditions for human occupancy - ASHRAE 55 Credit 7.2 Thermal Comfort: Verification Credit 8.1 Daylighting and Views: Daylight 808 Daylighting Credit 8.2 Daylighting and Views: Views A108.6 View to building exterior (Project Elective) 804.1 Fireplaces and appliance venting and combustion air 806.5 Acoustical ceiling tiles and wall systems emission limits 85% A108.2 Flooring deemed to comply list. (Project Elective) A108.3 Ceiling deemed to comply list. (Project Elective) A108.4 Wall deemed to comply list. (Project Elective) 806.6 Insulation VOC limits 807 Acoustic sound levels and testing. (Jurisdictional) A108.5 Total VOC limit >= 50% (Project Elective) 30
    31. 31. This concludes The American Institute of Architects Continuing Education Systems Course Sheila.Blake@houstontx.gov 832-394-9040

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