How to use Adobe Flash in Teaching

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If we are to target pupils from where they learn and meet their expectations, then Flash is a good starting point. In the age of Interactive Whiteboards (IWB), Flash has opened up new opportunities to engage and challenge pupils.

‘…students want an education that serves their needs. For many that means an education that is convenient, accessible and most importantly, relevant.’ (Macromedia Whitepaper 2004)

Children have different expectations about the role of technology in their lives and if teachers do not eventually meet these expectations then it could become difficult to ensure that learning is maintained for every pupil.

Flash gives pupils great opportunities to extend their skills.

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How to use Adobe Flash in Teaching

  1. 1. Adobe lash: Is it just flash or can it be useful?
  2. 2. What is Flash? How can it be used by teachers? How can it be used by pupils? Taking it further
  3. 3. What is flash? ‘ a technology that allows for animation or moving graphics on a website.’ www.gravitatedesign.com/glossary.htm ‘… [the] industry's most advanced authoring environment for creating interactive websites [and] digital experiences… design and author interactive content rich with video, graphics, and animation for truly unique, engaging websites, presentations or mobile content’ Adobe advert open canvas where the user create the content
  4. 4. How can it be used by teachers? Why should… ‘… students want an education that serves their needs. For many that means an education that is convenient, accessible and most importantly, relevant .’ Macromedia Whitepaper 2004
  5. 5. A new generation of children Different expectations about the role of technology in their lives Commodore 64 Hand-held game consoles Interactivity and graphic quality
  6. 6. A problem-solving approach to learning Skills focus
  7. 7. Organisation Pupils are faced with many decisions that ultimately affect the final product. layers symbols actions purpose audience
  8. 8. Presentation skills Bradley’s advert (Year 7)
  9. 9. Showing understanding e.g. develop an animation that explains a scientific process
  10. 10. Many, many other reasons: Motivation Students set themselves challenges to accomplish. This approach produces high levels of motivation as the challenges have been created by them and are generally suited to their ability. Independent learning Students in charge of the project and only use the teacher as facilitator encourages them to work independently
  11. 11. Reflection and evaluation At the start of each session, students place their newly created files in a shared folder. A few of the files were then viewed on the IWB and the class commented on the work, for example, its usability, layout, and questions were asked about how it was created and how they would change it to suit a different audience. Communication and teamwork Encourages students to work collaboratively: smaller jobs are delegated e.g. creating a layout, script to control movement, assessment opportunities to check understanding and project managing. A demanding process and challenges teams to work through a detailed plan before commencing.
  12. 12. Teach each other
  13. 13. Shanghai Students are taught Adobe Flash
  14. 14. Students are taught Adobe Flash
  15. 15. Students are taught Adobe Flash
  16. 16. Problems Financial constraints Complexity of the software Lack of useful training Time
  17. 17. Taking it further Books Forums www.actionscript.org www.kirupa.com Training

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