Who Are the Academically & Intellectually Gifted

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Who Are the Academically & Intellectually Gifted

  1. 1. Who Are theAcademically & Intellectually Gifted? Watson College of Education Angela Housand, Ph.D. housanda@uncw.edu
  2. 2. angelahousand.com
  3. 3. They Are All So Different… Children come to us in a variety of shapes, sizes, intellectual abilities, creative abilities, inter/intra personal skills, and a myriad more characteristics that makes each child we deal with unique and special. Carol Ann Tomlinson
  4. 4. ONE SIZE DOES NOT FIT ALL
  5. 5. Diversity in students can include:   Ability (aptitude) differences   Achievement differences   Differences in affect   Enthusiasm level and personality   Differences in effort   Effort vs. Ability
  6. 6. Diversity in students can include:   Academic background differences   Potentially poor preparation   Limited exposure   Cultural differences   Second language acquisition   Interaction style differences   Differences in self-regulation and study skills
  7. 7. Characteristics: Seeing¡  Unusual alertness¡  Joy in learning¡  Keen observation¡  Sees “Big Picture”¡  Makes connections¡  Intense focus¡  Curious
  8. 8. Characteristics: Speed¡  Early and rapid learning¡  Rapid language development¡  Metacognitively efficient
  9. 9. Characteristics: Differences¡  Superior language ¡  Verbal fluency ¡  Large vocabulary¡  Superior analytical and reasoning ability¡  High-capacity memory¡  Goes beyond what is sought¡  Abstract, complex, and insightful thinking
  10. 10. Joseph Renzulli:3 Ring Conception of Giftedness
  11. 11. Gifted Behaviors NOT Gifted People!
  12. 12. School  House  Gi*edness  Crea%ve  Gi*edness  
  13. 13. Teacher  Pleaser  Mischief  Makers  
  14. 14. ¡  Independent  ¡  High  energy  ¡  Curious  ¡  Sense  of  humor  ¡  Open-­‐minded  ¡  Need  for  privacy  and  alone  time  
  15. 15. ¡  Aware  of  their  own  creativeness  ¡  Originality  in  thought  and  action  ¡  Attracted  to  complexity  and  novelty  ¡  Artistic  tendencies  ¡  Willing  to  take  risks  ¡  Perceptive  
  16. 16. ¡  Impulsive   ¡  Neurotic  ¡  Egotistical   ¡  Temperamental  ¡  Argumentative   ¡  Capricious  ¡  Rebellious   ¡  Careless  ¡  Uncooperative   ¡  Disorganized  ¡  Stubborn   ¡  Demanding  ¡  Childish   ¡  Indifferent  to  ¡  Absentminded   Conventions  
  17. 17. Characteristics: Negative¡  Uneven mental development¡  Interpersonal difficulties¡  Underachievement
  18. 18. What differentiates giftedlearners from high achievers?
  19. 19. BrightKnows the Answers Asks the Questions Gifted
  20. 20. BrightIs Attentive Is Intellectually Engaged Gifted
  21. 21. BrightHas Good Ideas Has Original Ideas Gifted
  22. 22. BrightAbsorbs Information Manipulates Information Gifted
  23. 23. BrightTop Student Beyond Her Age Peers Gifted
  24. 24. BrightRepeats 6-8 Times for Mastery Repeats 1-2 Times for Mastery Gifted
  25. 25. BrightUnderstands Ideas Constructs Abstractions Gifted
  26. 26. BrightGrasps the Meaning Draws Inferences Gifted
  27. 27. BrightIs a Technician Is an Inventor Gifted
  28. 28. Thank You!
  29. 29. ServingAcademically & Intellectually Gifted Students Watson College of Education Angela Housand, Ph.D. housanda@uncw.edu
  30. 30. angelahousand.com
  31. 31. A Practical Guide to Differentiation
  32. 32. Why Aren’t SomeStudents Challenged?
  33. 33. Classroom Practices Study Teachers reported that they never had any training in meeting the needs of gifted students. 61% public school teachers 54% private school teachersArchambault, F. X., Jr., Westberg, K. L., Brown, S. W., Hallmark, B. W., Emmons, C. L., & Zhang, W. (1993). Regular classroom practices with gifted students: Results of a national survey of classroom teachers (Research Monograph 93102). Storrs, CT: The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, University of Connecticut."
  34. 34. Classroom Practices Observational Study Students experienced no instructional or curricular differentiation in 84% of the activities in which they participated: Reading Language Arts Mathematics Social Studies ScienceWestberg, K. L., Archambault, F. X., Jr., Dobyns, S. M., & Salvin, T. J. (1993). An observational study of instructional and curricular practices used with gifted and talented students in regular classroom (Research Monograph 93104). Storrs, CT: The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, University of Connecticut."
  35. 35. Types of Differentiation in Which Target Gifted Students Were Involved 100 80 Reading Language Arts Mathematics 60Percent Science 40 Social Studies All Subject Areas 20 0 No Differentiation Advanced Content Advanced Process Advanced Product Indep. Study w/ Assigned Topic Indep. Study w/ Self-selected Topic Other Differentiation No Differentiation Advanced Content Advanced Process Advanced Product Indep. Study w/Assigned Indep. Study w/Self-selected OtherDifferentiation
  36. 36. Ways to Differentiate Content•  Varied Texts•  Accelerated Coverage of Material•  Varied Supplementary Materials•  Independent Projects•  Tiered Lessons•  Interest Development Centers•  Compacting
  37. 37. Approximately 40-50% of traditional classroom material could be eliminated for targeted students.Reis, S. M., Westberg, K.L., Kulikowich, J., Caillard, F., Hébert, T., Plucker, J., Purcell, J.H., Rogers, J.B., & Smist,J.M. (1993). Why not let high ability students start school in January? The curriculum compacting study (ResearchMonograph 93106). Storrs, CT: The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, University of Connecticut."
  38. 38. Compacting"  Assesses what a student knows and what content is not yet mastered"  Content not yet mastered becomes part of learning goals"  Previously mastered content is not required thereby “freeing up” time for enriched, accelerated, or interest driven activities Renzulli & Reis (1997) Tomlinson (1995)
  39. 39. When teachers eliminated as much as 50% of the curriculum, no differences were found between treatment and control groups in most content areas. In fact, students whose curriculum was compacted scored higher than control group students in some areas.Reis, S. M., Westberg, K.L., Kulikowich, J., Caillard, F., Hébert, T., Plucker, J., Purcell, J.H., Rogers, J.B., & Smist,J.M. (1993). Why not let high ability students start school in January? The curriculum compacting study (ResearchMonograph 93106). Storrs, CT: The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, University of Connecticut."
  40. 40. What is Curriculum Compacting?"  Modifying or streamlining the regular curriculum"  Eliminating the repetition of previously mastered material"  Upgrading the challenge level of the regular curriculum
  41. 41. Student Behaviors Suggesting that Compacting May Be Necessary
  42. 42. •  Finishes tasks quickly•  Completes homework in class•  Appears bored during instruction time•  Brings in outside reading material•  Creates puzzles, games, or diversions in class
  43. 43. •  Tests scores consistently excellent•  Asks questions that indicate advanced familiarity with material•  Sought after by others for assistance•  Daydreams
  44. 44. For Students, Compacting Eliminates boredom resulting from unnecessary drill and practice. Provides challenge leading to continuous growth.
  45. 45. How to CompactStep One: Identify the objectivesin a given unit and pre-test studentsto ascertain mastery level.
  46. 46. How to CompactStep Two: Eliminate orStreamline instruction for studentswho demonstrate mastery.
  47. 47. How to CompactStep Three: Keep records of theprocess and instructional optionsavailable to compacted students.
  48. 48. InconceivableShould every student have anIndividualized Education Plan?
  49. 49. The Question of Equity Equity, the quality of being fair, is not about offering the exact same thing to every student, it is providing individuals with suitable challenges and experiences that will enable them to be successful and grow beyond where they are now or where they have been before.
  50. 50. Thank You!
  51. 51. Special Cases:Academically & Intellectually Gifted Students Watson College of Education Angela Housand, Ph.D. housanda@uncw.edu
  52. 52. angelahousand.com
  53. 53. Personality Factors
 Influencing Gifted Behavior""   Charm/Charisma" "   Perception of"   Need for Self, Self-Efficacy" Achievement" "   Courage""   Ego Strength" "   Character""   Energy" "   Intuition""   Sense of Destiny" "   Personal Attractiveness"
  54. 54. Environmental Factors Influencing Gifted Behavior»  SES »  Formal Education»  Parental »  Role Model Personalities Availability»  Education of »  Physical Illness Parents and/or Well»  Stimulation of Being Childhood »  Chance Factors Interests »  Zeitgeist»  Family Position
  55. 55. Asynchronous Development Uneven intellectual, physical, and emotional development.
  56. 56. Asynchronous Development§  Cognitively understand advanced concepts (like mortality) but lack emotional maturity to cope with knowledge§  Perceived as older due to cognitive ability, but lack behavioral maturity
  57. 57. Underachievers:  Personality   •  Low  self-­‐esteem  or   Low  self-­‐efficacy   •  Feelings  of  Pessimism   •  Anxious,  impulsive,  or   inaIen%ve   •  Aggressive,  hos%le   •  Depressed   •  Socially  immature  
  58. 58. Internal  Mediators   •  Fear  of  failure   •  Fear  of  success   •  Nega%ve  aMtude   toward  school   •  An%social,  rebellious   •  Self-­‐cri%cal  or   perfec%onis%c  
  59. 59. Maladaptive Strategies•  Lack goal-directed behavior•  Poor coping skills•  Poor self-regulation•  Defense mechanisms
  60. 60. Not all bad…•  Demonstrate honesty and integrity when rejecting inappropriate school work•  Intense outside interests•  Creative
  61. 61. What about these characteristics?""   Inability to master certain academic skills""   Lack of motivation""   Disruptive classroom behavior""   Failure to complete assignments""   Lack of organizational skills""   Poor listening and concentration skills""   Unrealistic self-expectations"
  62. 62. Twice-Exceptional•  Gifted with Learning Disability•  May also demonstrate –  Learned helplessness –  Perfectionism –  Supersensitivity –  Low self-esteem
  63. 63. Look For:•  Advanced •  Advanced problem- vocabulary use solving skills•  Exceptional •  Specific aptitude analytic abilities •  Good•  Divergent thinking memory•  High levels of creativity•  Spatial abilities
  64. 64. Thank You!

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