Helping Students Get Organized   & Self-Regulate Behavior for           21st Century Success             Angela M. Housand...
NRC     The National Research CenterG/T      on the Gifted and Talented	      www.gi%ed.uconn.edu	  
Joe Renzulli and Sally ReisAnd other amazing people…
Traded in My Last Name
angelahousand.com
Graduated and Got a Job…   Watson School of Education     Angela Housand, Ph.D.      housanda@uncw.edu
This Week I Have the Honor…
What hinders  student success?
This Week:Self-Regulation & Gifted StudentsRegulation of AffectRegulation of BehaviorRegulation of CognitionSelf-Determine...
Self-Regulated Learning Students are self-regulated when they are, “metacognatively, motivationally, and behaviorally acti...
Active engagement in the     learning process produces       increases in academic            performance.(Ablard & Lipsch...
Self-Regulated Learning•  Multi-faceted construct  –  Metacognition  –  Strategic Action  –  Motivation•  Enabling self-de...
Self-Regulated Learning•    Goal Setting                             •  Self-Monitoring•    Planning                      ...
Self-Regulated Learners•  Compared with low achieving students,   high achievers more frequently:   –  Set specific learni...
•    Personal Effort                                    •    Intrinsic Motivation                                    •    ...
Gifted students tend to               be more self-regulated               than their average               performing pee...
There still exists a large degree of variation among gifted students in their use of strategies associated with self- regu...
Self-­‐Regulated	  Learners	                	  This	  varia5on	  may	  explain	                    why	  some	  gi<ed	  st...
A  lthough there are manypossible explanations forwhy one could fail, effortand ability are the mostlikely causes that stu...
Teacher Rating of Students	Quality of                                                  Quality of Work  	     R2 = .66   	...
How can we, as educators, helpstudents take personal initiative   in the process of learning?
How can we help students take  responsibility for their own          learning?
How can we help students achieve their potential?
Self-Regulation Requires•  Regulation of affect•  Regulation of behavior•  Regulation of cognition    (Boekaerts 1997; Boe...
Dr. Carol Dweck:            Fixed Mindset                  vs.           Growth MindsetMindset
Fixed Mindset:          Believe traits are          fixed or unchangeable          Quantity of talent orMindset   intellig...
Growth Mindset:          Believe traits can be          developed w/ effort          Accomplishment          comes from pr...
Students must           think about how the           way they think andThinking   what they think           affects their...
Regulation of Affect
Reframe…•    I am successful because I am smart•    People like me because I am attractive•    I get opportunities because...
Reframe•  I am successful because…
Reframe•  People like me because…
Reframe•  I make mistakes because…
Blocks to Feeling in Control•  Motivated self-deception   –  Denying a state exists to reduce anxiety   –  “Oh, that is no...
Blocks to Feeling in Control•  Accessibility difficulties   –  More processing required to form an attitude,      more apt...
Teacher Strategy  Insiststudents’ own  their feelings   “Ifeel angry” vs.    “You made me mad”
Teacher Strategy  Helpstudents reframe by using  verbs instead of adjectives to  describe their feelings  “I    am succe...
Influence On a clean sheet of paper, list the past five  years vertically (2011, 2010, 2009…). Next to each year, list t...
Significant Influence When you reflect on your experience, do  you find that you had more control than  you thought? Stu...
Thinking about Achieving•    What skills do I need to achieve this?•    What help or assistance do I need?•    What resour...
Reflecting on Achievement•  Did I accomplish what I planned to   achieve?•  Was I distracted and how did I get back to   m...
Being in the Moment•  Can you change the past?•  What are you doing now that is working? How can you do more of the same?•...
Addressing	  the	     Surface	    Behavior	  is	     External	  	  
Under	  the	     Surface	     Need	  for	  Internaliza5on	  
Overexcitabilities Characteristics that reveal a heightened response to stimuli Found more frequently in gifted populati...
    People with SOR respond to sensation faster,     with more intensity, or for a longer duration     than those with ty...
    Behavioral responses     ◦  Impulsivity     ◦  Aggression     ◦  Withdrawal     ◦  Avoidance of sensation    Emotion...
Sensory	  Sensi5vity	  •  Greater	  CNS	  Arousal	     –  Show	  greater	  responsiveness	        to	  sensory	  s5muli	  ...
Characteris5cs	  of	  People	  with	    High	  Sensory	  Sensi5vity	                   •  Sense	  of	  being	  different	  ...
Characteris5cs	  of	  People	  with	    High	  Sensory	  Sensi5vity	                   •  Acknowledge	  importance	       ...
Sensory	  Sensi5vity	  of	  Gi<ed	  •  Tested	  gi<ed	  vs.	  normed	  sample	  on	  the	     Sensory	  Profile	  (Dunn,	  ...
Why address sensory sensitivity?•  Sensory stimuli create CNS arousal which   places demands upon the body•  The intensity...
Why address sensory sensitivity?•  To reduce stressors•  To positively enhance the experience of   the highly sensitive gi...
Mindfulness  Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D.  From the field of behavioral medicine  Used to control    Stress    Pain    Illn...
Mindfulness Attitudes  Non-judging     Impartial witness to our own experience     Cultivates emotional intelligence  ...
Emotional Intelligence  The ability to monitor  one’s own and other’s  feelings and emotions, to  discriminate among them ...
Mindfulness Attitudes  Trust     Developing a trust of yourself and your      feelings  Non-striving     Seems counter...
Mindfulness Attitudes  Letting Go     Put aside the tendency to elevate some life      experiences and reject others   ...
Goal of Mindfulness    Achieve a state of stability and calm    Increase self-discipline    Increase feelings of well-b...
Mindfulness How To  Release Tension    Sit comfortably, spine erect, feet on floor    Allow arms to hang straight down ...
Mindfulness How To  Mind Training    Sit comfortably, spine erect, feet on floor    Close your eyes if it feels comfort...
Mindfulness How To  Focusing the mind is easier said than   done     Requires consistent practice  Short and frequent  ...
Mindfulness  Training the mind  “I’m here to train my mind”  “I’m here to work on my mind”  Awake and calm  Present m...
Mindfulness  Connecting the mind and body  Feet flat on the floor  sitting up straight – string pulling from   the top ...
Regulation of Behavior
h]p://www.21stcenturyskills.org/	  
72	  
3,339    3,339
Technology Creates a WorldThat is Massively Interconnected                                   75	  
(Internet World Stats, 2009)
(De Moor, 2008)
(NPR March 16, 2011)
Digital Natives
Informa1on	  Overload	  Cogni5ve	  overs5mula5on	  that	  interferes	  with	  our	  ability	  to	  “think”	  (Toffler,	  197...
  Accelerating  rate of new information  Ease of duplication and transmission  Increase in the available sources of   i...
1. Identify Your Priorities  2. Set Goals     3. Manage Time & Materials        4. Be Discerning           5. Reflect & Ev...
Writing Prompt   I would like to improve…   Some people are unhappy with…   I want to learn more about…   An idea I wo...
Slifeweb.com	  
Why Goal Setting?Planned	  direc5on	  for	  efforts	  Provides	  clarity	  for	  assessment	  Opportunity	  to	  take	  res...
What doesgoal settinglook like foradults?
What is your personal definition         of success?
Unrealistic Goals  Goals set by other people     May be in conflict with student values, beliefs, or      desires  Insu...
Insufficient Goals  Fear of Failure    Fear prevents risk taking    Failure is a positive: shows where room for     imp...
"Happiness does not come from       doing easy work but from theafterglow of satisfaction that comes after the achievement...
Teacher Strategy  Help students set goals that are  slightly out of their immediate  reach, but not so far that they  can...
The greater danger for mostof us lies not in setting ouraim too high and falling short;but in setting our aim too low,and ...
SpecificMeasurableAttainableRealisticTime-bound
Privacy &Security
Categorize fordifferent types of      goals.
What steps will Itake to achievemy goal?
Accountability:    Share    Reminders
MonitorProgress
Reflect &Evaluate
Specific                Written    Measureable         Completion Check Box    Time Bound            Deadline Driven     P...
DO’s and DON’Ts of To Do Lists
Goal Setting Plan (Based on Heacox, 1991)1. What is one area of your class performance that you really want to improve? (T...
What school related goals would you like to work                            How do you expect to achieve these goals?     ...
Staying the Course""  Periodically review goals and modify to   reflect changing priorities and   experience""  Involve oth...
Cyclical and Ongoing
Setting a New Goal•  If goal was achieved easily, make next   goal harder•  If goal took to long to achieve, make   next g...
Attainment
Infrastructure	  
Infrastructure	  
Infrastructure	  
Infrastructure	  
Infrastructure	  
Infrastructure
OneLaptop perChild
(Eduventures, 2008)
(Valcke, et al, 2008)
Measuring Time on Task
SET A GOAL  TAKE A BREAK STAY ON TARGETREWARD YOURSELF
Calendar Ideas for Students"           • Task monitoring           • Set “reminders”           • Use with iGoogle         ...
Calendar Ideas for Teachers  Create group calendars  Provide assignment due dates  Set project timelines  Existing loc...
BE EFFICIENT
Managing the Madness of Email  ESTABLISH EMAIL TIME ZONES STRIVE TO ONLY TOUCH IT ONCEDOES YOUR PHONE REALLY HELP?DO NOT C...
“GET YOURSELF A FOLDER.”
• Annotate,	  Archive,	   My	  Library	       Organize	                   • Build	  a	  Personal	  Learning	  My	  Network...
Dropbox is software that syncs yourfiles online and across your computers."
How Much Space?             2GB FREEInstall on      Invite     Share      Install another     a friend or      a      on y...
I
Intended Project(s):How, when, and wherewill you share andcommunicate the resultsof your project with otherpeople?What For...
Getting Started:What skills, resources andmaterials will I need?Who is the intendedaudience?
Timeline:• Start Date• Completion Date• Progress Report• Dates• Meetings with theteacher!
Organizational Strategies•  The Environment   Specific location for work   Location should be distraction-free   Set asi...
Organizational Strategies•  The Environment   Specific location for work   Location should be distraction-free   Set asi...
Organizational Strategies•  The Environment   Specific location for work, but realize the    digital environment is comple...
Think Mobility
Honor Diversity of Style!"   Help students find an organizational    system the fits their “style”""   Encourage them to dev...
Every man should have a    built-in   automatic crap detector   operatinginside of him.
+              5 Types of Evaluation    1.    Understanding    2.    Relevancy    3.    Accuracy    4.    Reliability    5...
http://www.google.com/educators
www.wdyl.com"            Trends            Books            Sketchup            YouTube            Translate            Gr...
agoogleaday.com"
Students Ask:
Students Ask:
1. Identify Your Priorities  2. Set Goals     3. Manage Time & Materials        4. Be Discerning           5. Reflect & Ev...
Regulation of Cognition
Metacognition One’s knowledge of his or her own  cognitive processes or anything related  to them (Flavell, 1976). Knowl...
Teacher Strategy  Provideexplicit instruction on  thinking about thinking  (metacognitive awareness)  Provideopportuniti...
Teacher Strategy  Engage   students in complex tasks:   Extend  over time   Allow for variation in    expression style ...
Individualized Projects
•  What will I need to   work on my project?•  Where will I work?•  Who will I work with?•  What might hinder my   process?
•  Am I accomplishing   what I planned?•  Is this taking longer   than I thought?•  Am I on task or am I   being distracted?
•  Did I accomplish what I   planned to do?•  Was I distracted and how   did I get back to work?•  Did I plan enough time ...
Teacher Strategy  Encourage   risk-taking  Ensure that students are  sufficiently challenged so they  have opportunities...
Teacher Strategy  Encourage   risk-taking  Ensure that students are  sufficiently challenged so they  have opportunities...
MotivationTo be motivated means to be moved to do something
Internalizing	  Mo5va5on	                                                                               Intrinsic	  Amo5va...
Internalizing	  Mo5va5on:	                                          External	  Regula5on	  External	  Regula5on	          ...
Internalizing	  Mo5va5on:	                                             Introjec5on	  External	  Regula5on	                ...
Internalizing	  Mo5va5on:	                                             Iden5fica5on	  External	  Regula5on	                ...
•  Tied to Student’s   Identity•  Personally   Interesting•  Integral to the   Student’s Vision   of the future•  Viewed a...
Internalizing	  Mo5va5on:	                                              Integra5on	  External	  Regula5on	                ...
Internalizing	  Mo5va5on	                                                                                                 ...
MotivationDiminished perception of competence(self-efficacy), autonomy(meaningfulness), or control(environmental perceptio...
COMPETENCE…  Feelings of competence shape a person’s  willingness to actively engage and persist  in different behaviors. ...
SELF-EFFICACY…   An individual’s personal judgment of his or   her own ability to succeed in a specific   context.        ...
Self-efficacy influences:  What activities we select  How much effort we put forth  How persistent we are in the face o...
Increasing Self-efficacy  Past performance  Vicarious experiences (observing others perform)  Verbal persuasion   Phys...
Autonomy
Self-Determined Learners•  Achieve highly•  Learn conceptually•  Stay in school                        (Reeve, 2002)
Self-Determined Learners•  Achieve highly•  Learn conceptually•  Stay in school•  In large part, because their teachers   ...
ON TARGET            Autonomously-Motivated Students                           vs.               Control-Motivated Student...
ON TARGET            Autonomously-Motivated Students                           vs.               Control-Motivated Student...
ON TARGET               Educational Benefits of            Autonomy-Supportive Teachers                 •  Higher academic...
ON TARGET               Educational Benefits of            Autonomy-Supportive Teachers                 •  Greater concept...
ON TARGET                 In Short…            •  Autonomously motivated               students thrive in               ed...
Avoid Misconceptions•  Autonomy support is not:  – Permissiveness  – Neglect  – Independence  – Laissez-faire interaction ...
Avoid Misconceptions•  Autonomy support and   structure are two different   classroom elements which   have different aims...
Person	  Environment	  Fit	  •  Person	  /	  Environment	  fit	  is	  the	  degree	  to	  which	     a	  person	  or	  thei...
Good	  Environmental	  Fit	  Occurs	  When:	       A	  person	  adjusts	  to	  their	  surroundings	                      ...
Teacher Strategy  Spend  less time holding   instructional materials  Provide time for independent work  Provide hints ...
Teacher Strategy  In   conversation w/ students     Praise mastery     Respond to student generated      questions    ...
Teacher Strategy  Avoid    Directives  or “Taking Charge”    Steering students toward a right     answer    Being crit...
Teacher Strategy  Students benefit from being  listened to  Students   suffer from being  bossed
Parents	  and	  students	    rate	  controlling	  teachers	  as	  	              significantly	       more	  competent	  th...
Teacher Strategy  Provide clear expectations for   student behavior and performance  Create classroom structures that   ...
Failure is Part of the ProcessResiliencePerseverance
D              I              G              I              T              A              L	     IMMIGRANTS	              ...
Why	  Do	  We	  Ask	  Kids	  To	  UNPLUG	  At	   School?	  
“From the standpoint of thechild…he is unable to apply indaily life what he is learningat school. That is theisolation of ...
Thank You!
Questions?
What	  might	  you	  reconsider	  about	  your	  classroom	  prac5ce?	  List	  three	  poten5al	  changes.	  
Organize and Self-Regulate for Success
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Organize and Self-Regulate for Success

  1. 1. Helping Students Get Organized & Self-Regulate Behavior for 21st Century Success Angela M. Housand, Ph. D. University of North Carolina WilmingtonConfratute – University of Connecticut
  2. 2. NRC The National Research CenterG/T on the Gifted and Talented www.gi%ed.uconn.edu  
  3. 3. Joe Renzulli and Sally ReisAnd other amazing people…
  4. 4. Traded in My Last Name
  5. 5. angelahousand.com
  6. 6. Graduated and Got a Job… Watson School of Education Angela Housand, Ph.D. housanda@uncw.edu
  7. 7. This Week I Have the Honor…
  8. 8. What hinders student success?
  9. 9. This Week:Self-Regulation & Gifted StudentsRegulation of AffectRegulation of BehaviorRegulation of CognitionSelf-Determined Success
  10. 10. Self-Regulated Learning Students are self-regulated when they are, “metacognatively, motivationally, and behaviorally active participants in their own learning process.” (Zimmerman 1989, p. 329)
  11. 11. Active engagement in the learning process produces increases in academic performance.(Ablard & Lipschultz, 1998; Ames, 1984; Corno, 1986, 1989; Dweck, 1986; Schunk & Rice; 1985,1987, 1991; Zimmerman, 1989; Zimmerman & Martinez-Pons, 1990)
  12. 12. Self-Regulated Learning•  Multi-faceted construct –  Metacognition –  Strategic Action –  Motivation•  Enabling self-determined achievement (Boekaerts 1997; Boekaerts & Corno, 2005; Butler & Winne, 1995; Corno, 2001; Flavell, 1979; Perry, Phillips, & Hutchinson, 2006; Schunk & Zimmerman, 1998; Winne, 1995; Winne & Perry 2000; Zimmerman, 1989, 1990, 2000)
  13. 13. Self-Regulated Learning•  Goal Setting •  Self-Monitoring•  Planning •  Appropriate•  Self-Motivation Help-Seeking•  Attention Control •  Self-Evaluation•  Effective •  Self-Reflection Strategy Use (Boekaerts 1997; Boekaerts & Corno, 2005; Butler & Winne, 1995; Corno, 2001; Flavell, 1979; Perry, Phillips, & Hutchinson, 2006; Schunk & Zimmerman, 1998; Winne, 1995; Winne & Perry 2000; Zimmerman, 1989, 1990, 2000)
  14. 14. Self-Regulated Learners•  Compared with low achieving students, high achievers more frequently: –  Set specific learning goals –  Use a variety of learning strategies –  Self-monitor –  Adapt their efforts systematically www.gifted.uconn.edu/siegle/selfregulation/section4.html
  15. 15. •  Personal Effort •  Intrinsic Motivation •  Goal Orientation •  Self-efficacy •  Age •  Gender(Blair & Razza, 2007; McWhaw & Abrami, 2001; Miles & Stine-Morrow,2004; Zimmerman & Martinez-Pons, 1986, 1988, 1990)
  16. 16. Gifted students tend to be more self-regulated than their average performing peers.Self-Regulated Learners (Zimmerman & Martinez-Pons, 1990)
  17. 17. There still exists a large degree of variation among gifted students in their use of strategies associated with self- regulated learning. Self-Regulated Learners(Ablard & Lipschultz, 1998; Risemberg & Zimmerman, 1992; Zimmerman & Martinez-Pons, 1990)
  18. 18. Self-­‐Regulated  Learners    This  varia5on  may  explain   why  some  gi<ed  students   become  highly   produc5ve,  contribu5ng   members  of  society  and   others  are  in  danger  of   underachievement.    
  19. 19. A lthough there are manypossible explanations forwhy one could fail, effortand ability are the mostlikely causes that studentsreport. – Good & Brophy
  20. 20. Teacher Rating of Students Quality of Quality of Work R2 = .66 Ability Work R2 = .63 Effort Student Self-Rating R2 = .11 Quality of Quality of Work R2 = .52 Ability Work Effort (Siegle & McCoach)
  21. 21. How can we, as educators, helpstudents take personal initiative in the process of learning?
  22. 22. How can we help students take responsibility for their own learning?
  23. 23. How can we help students achieve their potential?
  24. 24. Self-Regulation Requires•  Regulation of affect•  Regulation of behavior•  Regulation of cognition (Boekaerts 1997; Boekaerts & Corno, 2005; Butler & Winne, 1995; Corno, 2001; Flavell, 1979; Perry, Phillips, & Hutchinson, 2006; Schunk & Zimmerman, 1998; Winne, 1995; Winne & Perry 2000; Zimmerman, 1989, 1990, 2000)
  25. 25. Dr. Carol Dweck: Fixed Mindset vs. Growth MindsetMindset
  26. 26. Fixed Mindset: Believe traits are fixed or unchangeable Quantity of talent orMindset intelligence finite
  27. 27. Growth Mindset: Believe traits can be developed w/ effort Accomplishment comes from practiceMindset and learning
  28. 28. Students must think about how the way they think andThinking what they think affects their about success.Thinking
  29. 29. Regulation of Affect
  30. 30. Reframe…•  I am successful because I am smart•  People like me because I am attractive•  I get opportunities because I am lucky•  I make mistakes because I am a failure•  I never win because I am a loser•  I get in trouble because the teacher does not like me
  31. 31. Reframe•  I am successful because…
  32. 32. Reframe•  People like me because…
  33. 33. Reframe•  I make mistakes because…
  34. 34. Blocks to Feeling in Control•  Motivated self-deception –  Denying a state exists to reduce anxiety –  “Oh, that is not due until next week.” –  A month long project•  Inaccurate verbalization –  Convinced they feel something the do not –  “I hate school!”
  35. 35. Blocks to Feeling in Control•  Accessibility difficulties –  More processing required to form an attitude, more apt to lose track of what the attitude is –  “I used to be good at math, but the teacher is giving me a bad grade so I obviously am not good at math.”
  36. 36. Teacher Strategy  Insiststudents’ own their feelings  “Ifeel angry” vs. “You made me mad”
  37. 37. Teacher Strategy  Helpstudents reframe by using verbs instead of adjectives to describe their feelings  “I am successful because I am smart.” vs. “I am successful because I work hard.”
  38. 38. Influence On a clean sheet of paper, list the past five years vertically (2011, 2010, 2009…). Next to each year, list the most important event that occurred in your life during that year. Estimate the percentage of control or influence you had over each event.
  39. 39. Significant Influence When you reflect on your experience, do you find that you had more control than you thought? Students may feel that external forces control their lives. Modify the exercise:  Last five months  Last five weeks
  40. 40. Thinking about Achieving•  What skills do I need to achieve this?•  What help or assistance do I need?•  What resources do I need?•  What can block progress?•  How will I maintain focus in order to achieve this?
  41. 41. Reflecting on Achievement•  Did I accomplish what I planned to achieve?•  Was I distracted and how did I get back to my task?•  Did I plan enough time?•  In which situation did I accomplish the most?
  42. 42. Being in the Moment•  Can you change the past?•  What are you doing now that is working? How can you do more of the same?•  When you had a problem like this one before, what good solutions did you work out? Or Have you ever helped someone with a problem like this before?
  43. 43. Addressing  the   Surface   Behavior  is   External    
  44. 44. Under  the   Surface   Need  for  Internaliza5on  
  45. 45. Overexcitabilities Characteristics that reveal a heightened response to stimuli Found more frequently in gifted population than general population Dabrowski and Piechowski
  46. 46.   People with SOR respond to sensation faster, with more intensity, or for a longer duration than those with typical sensory responsivity  Considered a Sensory Modulation Disorder by some
  47. 47.   Behavioral responses ◦  Impulsivity ◦  Aggression ◦  Withdrawal ◦  Avoidance of sensation  Emotional Responses ◦  Irritability ◦  Moodiness ◦  Inconsolability ◦  Poor Socialization
  48. 48. Sensory  Sensi5vity  •  Greater  CNS  Arousal   –  Show  greater  responsiveness   to  sensory  s5muli  in  all   sensory  modali5es   –  Emits  more  voluntary  motor   ac5vity   –  More  reac5ve  emo5onally  •  Might  also  explain   psychomotor  and  emo5onal   overexcitability  
  49. 49. Characteris5cs  of  People  with   High  Sensory  Sensi5vity   •  Sense  of  being  different   •  Need  to  take  frequent   breaks  during  busy  days   •  Conscious  arrangement   of  lives  to  reduce   s5mula5on  &  unwanted   surprise  
  50. 50. Characteris5cs  of  People  with   High  Sensory  Sensi5vity   •  Acknowledge  importance   of  spiritual  and  inner  lives   (including  dreams)   •  Sense  that  difficul5es   stemmed  from  fear  of   failure  due  to  overarousal   –  While  being  observed   –  Feeling  judged   –  During  compe55on  
  51. 51. Sensory  Sensi5vity  of  Gi<ed  •  Tested  gi<ed  vs.  normed  sample  on  the   Sensory  Profile  (Dunn,  1999)  •  Significant  differences  on  12  of  14  sensory   sec5ons  between  groups  •  Gi<ed  children  are  more  sensi5ve  to  their   physical  environment  •  More  affected  by  sensory  s5muli    
  52. 52. Why address sensory sensitivity?•  Sensory stimuli create CNS arousal which places demands upon the body•  The intensity and duration of arousal affect responses to stimuli•  Maximum and prolonged overload of information can be stressful
  53. 53. Why address sensory sensitivity?•  To reduce stressors•  To positively enhance the experience of the highly sensitive gifted individual•  To be responsive to unique needs•  To promote healthy working environments•  To increase the sustainability of focus and effort in productive endeavors
  54. 54. Mindfulness  Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D.  From the field of behavioral medicine  Used to control   Stress   Pain   Illness  Initial research conducted at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center
  55. 55. Mindfulness Attitudes  Non-judging   Impartial witness to our own experience   Cultivates emotional intelligence  Patience   Things unfold in their own time   Delay of gratification  Beginner’s Mind   What we think we “know” impedes understanding   Avoiding pre-conceived notions
  56. 56. Emotional Intelligence The ability to monitor one’s own and other’s feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them and to use that information to guide one’s thinking and actions. (Salovey & Mayer, 1990, p. 189)
  57. 57. Mindfulness Attitudes  Trust   Developing a trust of yourself and your feelings  Non-striving   Seems counter intuitive   Focusing on being clarifies what to strive for  Acceptance   Seeing things as they are   Enables one to act appropriately no matter what is happening around them
  58. 58. Mindfulness Attitudes  Letting Go   Put aside the tendency to elevate some life experiences and reject others   Cultivates emotional intelligence  Mindfulness is mind training.   “I am not thinking about that right now, I am observing – training my mind”   “I am here to work on my mind”
  59. 59. Goal of Mindfulness  Achieve a state of stability and calm  Increase self-discipline  Increase feelings of well-being  Reduce feelings of dysphoria  Increase self-awareness
  60. 60. Mindfulness How To  Release Tension   Sit comfortably, spine erect, feet on floor   Allow arms to hang straight down with hands about 10-12 inches from body   Close your eyes if it feels comfortable   Identify areas of tension in your mind or body   As you identify areas of tension, allow them to dissolve and flow down the arms and out the finger tips
  61. 61. Mindfulness How To  Mind Training   Sit comfortably, spine erect, feet on floor   Close your eyes if it feels comfortable   Bring your attention to your breath   Nose, mouth, lungs, or belly – wherever you sense your breath   Do not control breath, just observe   Maintain your attention on your breathing   When your mind wanders, simply let the thought go and return your focus to your breath
  62. 62. Mindfulness How To  Focusing the mind is easier said than done   Requires consistent practice  Short and frequent   5 to 15 minutes daily  Don’t force it!   When students loose focus, the time is up   Work to extend time each day
  63. 63. Mindfulness  Training the mind  “I’m here to train my mind”  “I’m here to work on my mind”  Awake and calm  Present mentally and physically  Focus on the breath – observe, don’t control – just observe  “I am not thinking about that right now, I am observing – training my mind”
  64. 64. Mindfulness  Connecting the mind and body  Feet flat on the floor  sitting up straight – string pulling from the top of the head  Presence – feel your feet, legs, abdomin, shoulders, arms, hands, neck, head  Creates a feeling of physical stability
  65. 65. Regulation of Behavior
  66. 66. h]p://www.21stcenturyskills.org/  
  67. 67. 72  
  68. 68. 3,339 3,339
  69. 69. Technology Creates a WorldThat is Massively Interconnected 75  
  70. 70. (Internet World Stats, 2009)
  71. 71. (De Moor, 2008)
  72. 72. (NPR March 16, 2011)
  73. 73. Digital Natives
  74. 74. Informa1on  Overload  Cogni5ve  overs5mula5on  that  interferes  with  our  ability  to  “think”  (Toffler,  1970,  p.  350)  
  75. 75.   Accelerating rate of new information  Ease of duplication and transmission  Increase in the available sources of information  Contradictions and inaccuracies  Lacking strategies to process information
  76. 76. 1. Identify Your Priorities 2. Set Goals 3. Manage Time & Materials 4. Be Discerning 5. Reflect & Evaluate
  77. 77. Writing Prompt   I would like to improve…   Some people are unhappy with…   I want to learn more about…   An idea I would like to try…   Something I think would really make a difference is…   Something I would like to change is…
  78. 78. Slifeweb.com  
  79. 79. Why Goal Setting?Planned  direc5on  for  efforts  Provides  clarity  for  assessment  Opportunity  to  take  responsibility  
  80. 80. What doesgoal settinglook like foradults?
  81. 81. What is your personal definition of success?
  82. 82. Unrealistic Goals  Goals set by other people   May be in conflict with student values, beliefs, or desires  Insufficient Information   Need realistic understanding of what is being attempted  Always Expecting Best   Focus on raising student’s average performance and increasing consistency
  83. 83. Insufficient Goals  Fear of Failure   Fear prevents risk taking   Failure is a positive: shows where room for improvement exists  Taking it “too easy”   Will not achieve anything of worth
  84. 84. "Happiness does not come from doing easy work but from theafterglow of satisfaction that comes after the achievement of a difficult task that demanded our best." -Theodore Isaac Rubin
  85. 85. Teacher Strategy  Help students set goals that are slightly out of their immediate reach, but not so far that they cannot achieve them  Helpsstudents set goals that require your help
  86. 86. The greater danger for mostof us lies not in setting ouraim too high and falling short;but in setting our aim too low,and achieving our mark. -Michelangelo
  87. 87. SpecificMeasurableAttainableRealisticTime-bound
  88. 88. Privacy &Security
  89. 89. Categorize fordifferent types of goals.
  90. 90. What steps will Itake to achievemy goal?
  91. 91. Accountability: Share Reminders
  92. 92. MonitorProgress
  93. 93. Reflect &Evaluate
  94. 94. Specific Written Measureable Completion Check Box Time Bound Deadline Driven Prioritized PrioritizedPeriodically Reviewed Revised RegularlyAccountable to Others Its Your Job
  95. 95. DO’s and DON’Ts of To Do Lists
  96. 96. Goal Setting Plan (Based on Heacox, 1991)1. What is one area of your class performance that you really want to improve? (This is your long termgoal. It may take you several weeks, months, or even a whole school year to improve this goal.)This goal is important to me because:2. What is one thing that you can do NOW to help you reach your long-term goal? (This is your short-term goal. You should be able to accomplish this goal in 2-4 weeks.)3. What steps do you need to reach your short-term goal?4. What things or people might keep you from reaching your goal? These are your obstacles.5. What can you do to get around your obstacles? These are your solutions.7. What special materials or help do you need to reach your goal? These are your resources.8. How will you reward yourself when you achieve your goal? These are your incentives.9. How and when will you check on your progress toward your goal? Who will help you to check onyour progress?Checkpoint 1 Date: ____________________________________________________Checkpoint 2 Date: ____________________________________________________ I am committed to working toward achieving my short term goal.Students signature: Todays date:Witness (Teachers) signature:
  97. 97. What school related goals would you like to work How do you expect to achieve these goals? toward during the next grading period? a. a. b. b.HOW DO YOU PLAN TO GET THERE? c. c. WHERE DO YOU WANT TO GO During this school year? a. a. b. b. Goal Setting or… After high school? AND a. a. b. b. How do you hope to achieve these goals? What personal goals would you like to achieve in the a. next six months? b. a. c. b. c. a. Within the next year or two? b. a. b. From Motivating Achievers, Carolyn Coil, Pieces of Learning
  98. 98. Staying the Course""  Periodically review goals and modify to reflect changing priorities and experience""  Involve others in the goal: Inform, discuss, and share""  Engage with successful, motivated people who also set goals""  Create a “Goals Collage”"
  99. 99. Cyclical and Ongoing
  100. 100. Setting a New Goal•  If goal was achieved easily, make next goal harder•  If goal took to long to achieve, make next goal a little easier•  If something was learned that leads to need for revision of other goals, do so•  If skills were lacking, set goals to learn necessary skills
  101. 101. Attainment
  102. 102. Infrastructure  
  103. 103. Infrastructure  
  104. 104. Infrastructure  
  105. 105. Infrastructure  
  106. 106. Infrastructure  
  107. 107. Infrastructure
  108. 108. OneLaptop perChild
  109. 109. (Eduventures, 2008)
  110. 110. (Valcke, et al, 2008)
  111. 111. Measuring Time on Task
  112. 112. SET A GOAL TAKE A BREAK STAY ON TARGETREWARD YOURSELF
  113. 113. Calendar Ideas for Students" • Task monitoring • Set “reminders” • Use with iGoogle • Track project timelines • Organize “TO DO” Lists
  114. 114. Calendar Ideas for Teachers  Create group calendars  Provide assignment due dates  Set project timelines  Existing location for parent information
  115. 115. BE EFFICIENT
  116. 116. Managing the Madness of Email ESTABLISH EMAIL TIME ZONES STRIVE TO ONLY TOUCH IT ONCEDOES YOUR PHONE REALLY HELP?DO NOT CONTRIBUTE TO JUNK MAIL
  117. 117. “GET YOURSELF A FOLDER.”
  118. 118. • Annotate,  Archive,   My  Library   Organize   • Build  a  Personal  Learning  My  Network   Network   • Create  a  Group  Knowledge   My  Groups   Repository   • Research,  Share,  Community   Collaborate  
  119. 119. Dropbox is software that syncs yourfiles online and across your computers."
  120. 120. How Much Space? 2GB FREEInstall on Invite Share Install another a friend or a on yourcomputer. colleague. folder. phone.
  121. 121. I
  122. 122. Intended Project(s):How, when, and wherewill you share andcommunicate the resultsof your project with otherpeople?What Format Will YourProject Take? "What will your product be?Project Description:What do you hope to findout or learn? "
  123. 123. Getting Started:What skills, resources andmaterials will I need?Who is the intendedaudience?
  124. 124. Timeline:• Start Date• Completion Date• Progress Report• Dates• Meetings with theteacher!
  125. 125. Organizational Strategies•  The Environment  Specific location for work  Location should be distraction-free  Set aside a specific time  Daily, regardless of whether there is homework or not  Supplies and resources available and accessible
  126. 126. Organizational Strategies•  The Environment  Specific location for work  Location should be distraction-free  Set aside a specific time  Daily, regardless of whether there is homework or not  Supplies and resources available and accessible•  Still true, but…
  127. 127. Organizational Strategies•  The Environment  Specific location for work, but realize the digital environment is complex  Location should be distraction-free  Set aside a specific time, and work to increase focus  Daily, but “down time” is good too  Supplies and resources available online and students need access to the internet
  128. 128. Think Mobility
  129. 129. Honor Diversity of Style!"   Help students find an organizational system the fits their “style”""   Encourage them to develop their own systems""   Allow trial and error: Have patience to give system ideas a fair chance"
  130. 130. Every man should have a built-in automatic crap detector operatinginside of him.
  131. 131. + 5 Types of Evaluation 1.  Understanding 2.  Relevancy 3.  Accuracy 4.  Reliability 5.  Bias (Coiro, 2006)
  132. 132. http://www.google.com/educators
  133. 133. www.wdyl.com" Trends Books Sketchup YouTube Translate Groups Patent Search Earth Voice Calendar Blog Search Gmail Image Search Maps Moderator
  134. 134. agoogleaday.com"
  135. 135. Students Ask:
  136. 136. Students Ask:
  137. 137. 1. Identify Your Priorities 2. Set Goals 3. Manage Time & Materials 4. Be Discerning 5. Reflect & Evaluate
  138. 138. Regulation of Cognition
  139. 139. Metacognition One’s knowledge of his or her own cognitive processes or anything related to them (Flavell, 1976). Knowledge about when and how to use specific strategies for learning and problem solving
  140. 140. Teacher Strategy  Provideexplicit instruction on thinking about thinking (metacognitive awareness)  Provideopportunities for students to practice metacognition
  141. 141. Teacher Strategy  Engage students in complex tasks:  Extend over time  Allow for variation in expression style  Integrate multiple processes (Cognitive and procedural)
  142. 142. Individualized Projects
  143. 143. •  What will I need to work on my project?•  Where will I work?•  Who will I work with?•  What might hinder my process?
  144. 144. •  Am I accomplishing what I planned?•  Is this taking longer than I thought?•  Am I on task or am I being distracted?
  145. 145. •  Did I accomplish what I planned to do?•  Was I distracted and how did I get back to work?•  Did I plan enough time or did it take longer than I thought?•  In which situation did I accomplish the most work?
  146. 146. Teacher Strategy  Encourage risk-taking  Ensure that students are sufficiently challenged so they have opportunities to fail
  147. 147. Teacher Strategy  Encourage risk-taking  Ensure that students are sufficiently challenged so they have opportunities to fail  YES, let them fail!
  148. 148. MotivationTo be motivated means to be moved to do something
  149. 149. Internalizing  Mo5va5on   Intrinsic  Amo5va5on   Mo5va5on   (Deci  &  Ryan,  1995;  Ryan  &  Deci,  2000)  
  150. 150. Internalizing  Mo5va5on:   External  Regula5on  External  Regula5on   Introjec5on   Iden5fca5on   Itegra5on   Externally   Act  to  gain   Behaviors   Behaviors   mo5vated   approval   become   become   Punishment/   Do  not  fully   personally   central  to   Reward   understand   important   iden5ty   Compliance   purpose     (Deci  &  Ryan,  1995;  Ryan  &  Deci,  2000)  
  151. 151. Internalizing  Mo5va5on:   Introjec5on  External  Regula5on   Introjec5on   Iden5fca5on   Itegra5on   Externally   Act  to  gain   Behaviors   Behaviors   mo5vated   approval   become   become   Punishment/   Unknown     personally   central  to   Reward   purpose     important   iden5ty   Compliance   (Deci  &  Ryan,  1995;  Ryan  &  Deci,  2000)  
  152. 152. Internalizing  Mo5va5on:   Iden5fica5on  External  Regula5on   Introjec5on   Iden5fica5on   Integra5on   Externally   Act  to  gain   Behaviors   Behaviors   mo5vated   approval   become   become   Punishment/   Do  not  fully   personally   central  to   Reward   understand   important   iden5ty   Compliance   purpose     (Deci  &  Ryan,  1995;  Ryan  &  Deci,  2000)  
  153. 153. •  Tied to Student’s Identity•  Personally Interesting•  Integral to the Student’s Vision of the future•  Viewed as Useful (Eccles & Wigfield)
  154. 154. Internalizing  Mo5va5on:   Integra5on  External  Regula5on   Introjec5on   Iden5fica5on   Integra5on   Externally   Act  to  gain   Behaviors   Behaviors   mo5vated   approval   become   become   Punishment/   Do  not  fully   personally   central  to   Reward   understand   important   self-­‐iden5ty   Compliance   purpose     (Deci  &  Ryan,  1995;  Ryan  &  Deci,  2000)  
  155. 155. Internalizing  Mo5va5on   Intrinsic  Amo5va5on   Mo5va5on   External  Regula5on   Introjec5on   Iden5fica5on   Integra5on   Externally   Act  to  gain   Behaviors   Behaviors   mo5vated   approval   become   become   Punishment/   Do  not  fully   personally   central  to   Reward   understand   important   self-­‐iden5ty   Compliance   purpose     (Deci  &  Ryan,  1995;  Ryan  &  Deci,  2000)  
  156. 156. MotivationDiminished perception of competence(self-efficacy), autonomy(meaningfulness), or control(environmental perception) leads tolower motivation and a decreasedwillingness to pursue goals and persistin their attainment, thus limitingoverall educational growth.
  157. 157. COMPETENCE… Feelings of competence shape a person’s willingness to actively engage and persist in different behaviors. (Bandura 1986, 1997)
  158. 158. SELF-EFFICACY… An individual’s personal judgment of his or her own ability to succeed in a specific context. (Bandura 1986, 1997)
  159. 159. Self-efficacy influences:  What activities we select  How much effort we put forth  How persistent we are in the face of difficulties  The difficulty of the goals we set
  160. 160. Increasing Self-efficacy  Past performance  Vicarious experiences (observing others perform)  Verbal persuasion   Physiological cues
  161. 161. Autonomy
  162. 162. Self-Determined Learners•  Achieve highly•  Learn conceptually•  Stay in school (Reeve, 2002)
  163. 163. Self-Determined Learners•  Achieve highly•  Learn conceptually•  Stay in school•  In large part, because their teachers support their autonomy rather than control their behavior (Reeve, 2002)
  164. 164. ON TARGET Autonomously-Motivated Students vs. Control-Motivated Students •  Higher academic achievement •  Higher perceived competence •  More positive emotionality •  Higher self-worth (Reeve, 2002)
  165. 165. ON TARGET Autonomously-Motivated Students vs. Control-Motivated Students •  Preference for optimal challenge •  Enjoy optimal challenge •  Stronger perceptions of control •  Greater creativity •  Higher rates of retention (Reeve, 2002)
  166. 166. ON TARGET Educational Benefits of Autonomy-Supportive Teachers •  Higher academic achievement •  Higher perceived competence •  More positive emotionality •  Higher self-esteem (Reeve, 2002)
  167. 167. ON TARGET Educational Benefits of Autonomy-Supportive Teachers •  Greater conceptual understanding •  Greater flexibility in thinking •  More information processing •  Greater creativity •  Higher rates of retention (Reeve, 2002)
  168. 168. ON TARGET In Short… •  Autonomously motivated students thrive in educational settings •  Students benefit when teachers support their autonomy (Reeve, 2002)
  169. 169. Avoid Misconceptions•  Autonomy support is not: – Permissiveness – Neglect – Independence – Laissez-faire interaction style
  170. 170. Avoid Misconceptions•  Autonomy support and structure are two different classroom elements which have different aims and different effects•  They are NOT the same, but can be mutually supportive
  171. 171. Person  Environment  Fit  •  Person  /  Environment  fit  is  the  degree  to  which   a  person  or  their  personality  is  compa5ble  with   their  environment  
  172. 172. Good  Environmental  Fit  Occurs  When:   A  person  adjusts  to  their  surroundings   AND   Adapts  the  environment  to  fit  their  needs  
  173. 173. Teacher Strategy  Spend less time holding instructional materials  Provide time for independent work  Provide hints but resist giving answers  Encourage conversation  Listen – even more than you do now
  174. 174. Teacher Strategy  In conversation w/ students   Praise mastery   Respond to student generated questions   Make statements that are empathetic and rich in perspective taking
  175. 175. Teacher Strategy  Avoid   Directives or “Taking Charge”   Steering students toward a right answer   Being critical or evaluative   Motivating through external rewards   Motivating through pressure
  176. 176. Teacher Strategy  Students benefit from being listened to  Students suffer from being bossed
  177. 177. Parents  and  students   rate  controlling  teachers  as     significantly   more  competent  than  autonomy-­‐suppor5ve  teachers.  
  178. 178. Teacher Strategy  Provide clear expectations for student behavior and performance  Create classroom structures that are consistent and provide access to materials  Have systems in place for recurring activities
  179. 179. Failure is Part of the ProcessResiliencePerseverance
  180. 180. D I G I T A L   IMMIGRANTS   D I V I D E  NATIVES  
  181. 181. Why  Do  We  Ask  Kids  To  UNPLUG  At   School?  
  182. 182. “From the standpoint of thechild…he is unable to apply indaily life what he is learningat school. That is theisolation of the school - itsisolation from life.” John Dewey
  183. 183. Thank You!
  184. 184. Questions?
  185. 185. What  might  you  reconsider  about  your  classroom  prac5ce?  List  three  poten5al  changes.  

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