Implementing the Schoolwide Enrichment Model

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Implementing the Schoolwide Enrichment Model

  1. 1. Implementing the Schoolwide Enrichment ModelAngela M. HousandUniversity of North Carolina, WilmingtonNova Scotia Summit 2012
  2. 2. NRC The National Research CenterG/T on the Gifted and Talented www.gi%ed.uconn.edu  
  3. 3. Joe Renzulli and Sally ReisAnd other amazing people…
  4. 4. Traded in My Last Name
  5. 5. angelahousand.com
  6. 6. Graduated and Got a Job… Watson School of Education Angela Housand, Ph.D. housanda@uncw.edu
  7. 7. Today I Have the Honor
  8. 8. 3 Ring Conception of Giftedness
  9. 9. TalentCan BeDeveloped latent emergent manifest
  10. 10. Gifted Artist Talented MathematicianUse “defining” terms as adjectives: Talented Musician Gifted Writer
  11. 11. Gifted Behaviors NOT Gifted People!
  12. 12. School  House  Gi*edness  Crea&ve  Gi*edness  
  13. 13. Teacher  Pleaser  Mischief  Maker  
  14. 14. ONE SIZE DOES NOT FIT ALL
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
  17. 17. Enrichment  Clusters  Groups  of  students  who  share  common  interests  and  come  together  during  special  &me  blocks  to  pursue  these  interests  with  adults  who  share  their  interests  and  want  to  help  students  develop  their  talents  in  this  area  and  produce  a  product  or  service!  
  18. 18. Features  of  Enrichment  Clusters   Mul&-­‐age   Interest-­‐Based   Product-­‐Oriented   Teacher  as  Facilitator   and  Par&cipant  
  19. 19. 20%  
  20. 20. Prospect  Sierra  
  21. 21. Amphibious  Vehicle  
  22. 22. Amphibious  Vehicle  
  23. 23. What Skills Are Required?  Problem Finding  Calculating  Organizing (relevant from irrelevant)  Planning  Communication  Collaboration  Metacognitive
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
  26. 26. Joseph S. Renzulli Abilities Interests Style PreferencesMaximum Instructional Learning Thinking ExpressionPerformance Interest Styles Environment Styles StyleIndicators Areas Preferences Preferences Preferences PreferencesTests Fine Arts Recitation & Drill Written Inter/Intra Analytic •Standardized Peer Tutoring Crafts Personal (School Smart) Lecture Oral •Teacher-Made Literary •Self-Oriented Lecture/DiscussionCourse Grades Synthetic/ Historical Discussion •Peer-Oriented ManipulativeTeacher Ratings Creative Mathematical/Logical Guided Independent •Adult-OrientedProduct Evaluation (Creative, Study * Inventive) Discussion •Written Physical Sciences •Combined Learning /Interest •Oral Life Sciences Center Physical Display Practical/ •Visual Political/Judicial Simulation, Role Playing, •Sound Contextual Athletic/Recreation Dramatization, Guided •Heat (Street Smart) Dramatization •Musical Fantasy •Constructed Marketing/Business •Light Learning Games Legislative Artistic(Note differences between Drama/Dance Replicative Reports or •Designassigned and self-selected Musical Performance Projects* •Mobility Executive Graphicproducts) Musical Composition Investigative Reports or •Time of DayLevel of Participation Projects* Judicial Commercial in Learning Managerial/Business •Food Intake Unguided Independent Activities Photography •Seating Study* Ref: Sternberg, ServiceDegree of Interaction 1984, 1988, 1990 Film/Video Internship* With Others Ref: Amabile, 1983; Computers Apprenticeship* Ref: Kettle, Renzulli, Dunn, Dunn, & Price, & Rizza, 1998;Ref: General Tests and Other (Specify) *With or without a mentor 1977; Gardner, 1983 Renzulli & Reis, 1985Measurements Literature Ref: Renzulli, 1997 Ref: Renzulli & Smith, 1978
  27. 27. Interest-A-Lyzer
  28. 28. Learning Styles InventorySample Items (Renzulli & Smith)… Really Dislike……..Really LikeBeing a member of a panel that 1 2 3 4 5is discussing current eventsWorking on your own to prepare 1 2 3 4 5material you will discuss in class
  29. 29. •  Tied to Student’s Identity•  Personally Interesting•  Integral to the Student’s Vision of the future•  Viewed as Useful (Eccles & Wigfield)
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  31. 31. Ways to Differentiate Content•  Varied Texts•  Accelerated Coverage of Material•  Varied Supplementary Materials•  Independent Projects•  Tiered Lessons•  Interest Development Centers•  Compacting
  32. 32. When once the child haslearned that four and twoare six, a thousandrepetitions will give him nonew information, and it is awaste of time to keep himemployed in that manner. J.M. Greenwood Principles of Education Practically Applied, 1888
  33. 33. Approximately 40-50% of traditional classroom material could be eliminated for targeted students.Reis, S. M., Westberg, K.L., Kulikowich, J., Caillard, F., Hébert, T., Plucker, J., Purcell, J.H., Rogers, J.B., & Smist,J.M. (1993). Why not let high ability students start school in January? The curriculum compacting study (ResearchMonograph 93106). Storrs, CT: The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, University of Connecticut."
  34. 34. When teachers eliminated as much as 50% of the curriculum, no differences were found between treatment and control groups in most content areas. In fact, students whose curriculum was compacted scored higher than control group students in some areas.Reis, S. M., Westberg, K.L., Kulikowich, J., Caillard, F., Hébert, T., Plucker, J., Purcell, J.H., Rogers, J.B., & Smist,J.M. (1993). Why not let high ability students start school in January? The curriculum compacting study (ResearchMonograph 93106). Storrs, CT: The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, University of Connecticut."
  35. 35. What is Curriculum Compacting?• Modifying or streamlining the regular curriculum• Eliminating the repetition of previously mastered material• Upgrading the challenge level of the regular curriculum• Providing time for enrichment and/or acceleration activities while ensuring mastery of basic skills
  36. 36. CompactingEliminates boredomresulting fromunnecessary drilland practice.Provides challengeleading tocontinuous growth.
  37. 37. INDIVIDUAL EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING GUIDE The Compactor Prepared by: Joseph S. Renzulli Linda M. SmithNAME__________________________________ AGE________ TEACHER(S) _______________________ Individual Conference Dates And Persons Participating in Planning Of IEPSCHOOL _______________________________ GRADE_____ PARENT(S) ________________________ _______ _______ _______ _______CURRICULUM AREAS TO BE CONSIDERED PROCEDURES FOR COMPACTING BASIC ACCELERATION AND/OR ENRICHMENTFOR COMPACTING Provide a brief description of MATERIAL Describe activities that will be used to ACTIVITIES Describe activities that will be used tobasic material to be covered during this marking period guarantee proficiency in basic curricular areas. provide advanced level learning experiences in eachand the assessment information or evidence that area of the regular curriculum.suggests the need for compacting. Name it. Prove it. Change it. What material needs to be Exactly what material is to be What enrichment and/or covered? excluded? acceleration activities will be included? What evidence shows a need for How will you prove mastery? Independent Study Acceleration compacting? Mini-courses Honors Courses College Courses Mentorships Small Group Investigations Work Study Check here if additional information is recorded Copyright © 1978 by Creative Learning Press, Inc. P.O. Box 320 Mansfield Center, CT 06250. All rights reserved. on the reverse side.
  38. 38. Ways to Differentiate Content•  Varied Texts•  Accelerated Coverage of Material•  Varied Supplementary Materials•  Independent Projects•  Tiered Lessons•  Interest Development Centers•  Compacting
  39. 39. Tiered Lessons"  Varied level of activities"  Designed to ensure that students explore ideas at a level that builds on prior knowledge"  Prompts continued growth
  40. 40. Tiered  Lessons  
  41. 41. Tiered  Lessons  
  42. 42. Tiered  Lessons  
  43. 43. Why Use Tiered Instruction?Maximizes the likelihood that   Each student comes away with key skills and understandings.   Each student is appropriately challenged.   Each student avoids work that is anxiety- producing (too hard) or boredom-producing (too easy)
  44. 44. What Can Be Tiered?"   Assignments "   Experiments"   Activities "   Materials"   Homework "   Assessments"   Learning Centers "   Writing Prompts
  45. 45. Ways to Differentiate Content•  Varied Texts•  Accelerated Coverage of Material•  Varied Supplementary Materials•  Independent Projects•  Tiered Lessons•  Interest Development Centers•  Compacting
  46. 46. The Illusion of Choice
  47. 47. Independent Projects•  Build on student interest•  Encourage independence•  Allow work with complex and abstract ideas•  Enable long-term and in-depth work on topics of interest•  Develop task commitment and self-regulation•  Teach planning and research skills at advanced levels
  48. 48. Schoolwide  Enrichment  Model   2SEM 2SEM?
  49. 49. Garner  Support  Buy-­‐In  
  50. 50.  Administrator(s) Art Teacher Music Teacher Technology Specialist Media Specialist Social Worker/ Counselor Parents & Teachers
  51. 51.  Motivated Willing Inclusive
  52. 52. Recruit Individuals to ProvideEnrichment
  53. 53. Parents & Community •  Hold an informational meeting for parents •  Send emails home to all families •  Write letters to local businesses and community leaders •  Write to the paper
  54. 54. Exposure to a Wide Variety •  Disciplines •  Persons •  Topics •  Places •  Occupations •  Events •  Hobbies
  55. 55.  IdentifyTeacher & Student Interests Organize Enrichment Clusters Review Enrichment Materials Provide Ongoing Teacher Training on SEM Plan Enrichment Opportunities
  56. 56. Difficulties you WILL Encounter •  TIME •  Students Who Have •  SPACE too Many Interests •  MONEY •  Students Who Lose •  Scheduling Interest •  Conflicts with Test •  Isolation Preparations •  Communication •  Feeling •  Philosophical OVERWHELMED Differences
  57. 57. Keys to Success•  Be FLEXIBLE •  Ignore “Nay-Sayers”•  Develop Good PR •  Suck Up Skills •  Engage the•  Start small Community•  Work with •  Find Authentic “Trailblazers” Audiences
  58. 58. Never doubt that a small groupof thoughtful, committedcitizens can change the world.Indeed, it is the only thing thatever has. -Margaret Mead

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