Helping Students Self-Motivate, Self-
Regulate and Engage in a Digital Age
!
Angela M. Housand, Ph. D.
University of North...
angelahousand.com
&
www.gi%ed.uconn.edu
The National Research Center
on the Gifted and Talented
This Week I Have the Honor…
Self-Motivate
Motivation
To be motivated means to be moved to do something
Motivation	

(Malone & Lepper, 1987)
Curiosity
Control
Optimal Challenge
Fantasy
Interpersonal	

(Cooperation, Competition...
• Curious
• Independent
• Attracted to
complexity
• Originality in
thought and action
• Willing to take risks
• Aware of t...
Motivation is Complex
Perception of Competence
Experience of Autonomy
Sense of Control
Willingness to Pursue Goals
Persist...
Internalizing  Mo.va.on
(Deci  &  Ryan,  1995;  Ryan  &  Deci,  2000)
Amo.va.on
Intrinsic  
Mo.va.on
Internalizing	
  Mo4va4on:

External  Regula.on
External
Regulation
Externally
motivated
Punishment/
Reward
Compliance
(De...
Internalizing	
  Mo4va4on:

Introjec.on
External
Regulation
Externally
motivated
Punishment/
Reward
Compliance
Introjectio...
Internalizing	
  Mo4va4on:

Iden.fica.on
External
Regulation
Externally
motivated
Punishment/
Reward
Compliance
Introjectio...
• Tied to Student’s
Identity
• Personally
Interesting
• Integral to the
Student’s Vision
of the future
• Viewed as Useful
...
Internalizing	
  Mo4va4on:

Integra.on
External
Regulation
Externally
motivated
Punishment/
Reward
Compliance
Introjection...
Internalizing  Mo.va.on
(Deci  &  Ryan,  1995;  Ryan  &  Deci,  2000)
Amo.va.on
Intrinsic  
Mo.va.on
External
Regulation
I...
Intrinsic Motivation
(Self-Determination Theory)
Perception of Competence
Experience of Autonomy
Sense of Control
Willingn...
RELATEDNESS...
Feeling connected to others and having a
sense of belonging to a community.
COMPETENCE…
Ability to demonstrate one’s capacity for
success when faced with a challenge or
opportunity.
COMPETENCE…
Feelings of competence shape a person’s
willingness to actively engage and persist in
different behaviors.
(Ba...
Self-efficacy influences:
! What activities we select
! How much effort we put forth
! How persistent we are in the face o...
Increasing Self-efficacy
! Past performance
! Vicarious experiences (observing others perform)
! Verbal persuasion 
! Phys...
Autonomy
The more autonomous (self-
determined) a person
believes their behavior to be
the greater the personal
satisfacti...
Autonomous Learners
• Achieve highly
• Learn conceptually
• Stay in school
(Reeve, 2002)
Autonomous Learners
(Reeve, 2002)
• Achieve highly
• Learn conceptually
• Stay in school
!
• In large part, because their ...
ONTARGET
Autonomously-Motivated Students

vs.

Control-Motivated Students
• Higher academic achievement
• Higher perceived...
ONTARGET
Autonomously-Motivated Students

vs.

Control-Motivated Students
(Reeve, 2002)
• Preference for optimal challenge...
ONTARGET
Educational Benefits of
Autonomy-Supportive Teachers
(Reeve, 2002)
• Higher academic achievement
• Higher perceiv...
ONTARGET
Educational Benefits of
Autonomy-Supportive Teachers
(Reeve, 2002)
• Greater conceptual understanding
• Greater f...
ONTARGET
In Short…
(Reeve, 2002)
• Autonomously motivated
students thrive in
educational settings
!
• Students benefit whe...
• Autonomy support is not:
–Permissiveness
–Neglect
–Independence
–Laissez-faire interaction style
Avoid Misconceptions
Avoid Misconceptions
• Autonomy support and
structure are two different
classroom elements which
have different aims and
d...
• Spend less time holding
instructional materials	

• Provide time for independent
work	

• Provide hints but resist givin...
• In conversation w/ students	

• Praise mastery	

• Respond to student generated
questions	

• Make statements that are
e...
• Avoid	

• Directives or “Taking Charge”	

• Steering students toward a right
answer	

• Being critical or evaluative	

•...
Parents  and  students  
rate  controlling  teachers  as    
significantly  
more  competent  than  
autonomy-­‐suppor.ve  ...
Motivation	

(Malone & Lepper, 1987)
Self-Determination	

(Deci & Ryan, 1980; 2000)
Curiosity Goal Pursuit
Control Autonom...
Thinking about Achieving
• What skills do I need to achieve this?
• What help or assistance do I need?
• What resources do...
Reflecting on Achievement
• Did I accomplish what I planned to
achieve?
• Was I distracted and how did I get back to
my ta...
LEARNING
CONTRACTS
Clear	
  Expecta4ons
Authen4c	
  Audience
A	
  Timeline	
  with  
Feedback	
  Opportuni4es	
  Built-­‐in
Clear	
  Content	
  &	
  Resources
Accountability
Clear	
  Strategies	
  &	
  Skills
Accountability
• Agreement	
  between	
  teacher	
  &	
  student  
• Student	
  independence	
  &	
  autonomy  
• Increased	
  student	
 ...
Motivation	

(Malone & Lepper, 1987)
Self-
Determination	

(Deci & Ryan, 1980; 2000)
Learning
Contracts
Curiosity Goal Pur...
Learning  contracts  allow  
students  to  work  on  a  
process  that  extends  over  
.me,  requiring  planning,  
regul...
Mihaly  
Csikszentmihalyi
Apathy
Flow  Channel
Apathy
Flow  Channel
Increasing  Skills
Increasing  Skills
Increasing  Challenge
Increasing  Challenge
To Experience FLOW...
...the task must	

provide clear goals and feedback.
To Experience FLOW...
...one must	

become immersed in the activity.
To Experience FLOW...
...the task must	

be challenging and require skill.
To Experience FLOW...
...one must	

learn to enjoy immediate experience.
Mindfulness
! Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D.
! From the field of behavioral medicine
! Used to control
! Stress
! Pain
! Illness
! ...
Mindfulness Attitudes
! Non-judging
! Impartial witness to our own experience
! Cultivates emotional intelligence
! Patien...
Emotional Intelligence
The ability to monitor
one’s own and other’s
feelings and emotions, to
discriminate among them
and ...
Mindfulness Attitudes
! Trust
! Developing a trust of yourself and your
feelings
! Non-striving
! Seems counter intuitive
...
Mindfulness Attitudes
! Letting Go
! Put aside the tendency to elevate some life
experiences and reject others
! Cultivate...
Goal of Mindfulness
! Achieve a state of stability and calm
! Increase self-discipline
! Increase feelings of well-being
!...
Mindfulness How To
! Release Tension
! Sit comfortably, spine erect, feet on floor
! Allow arms to hang straight down with...
Mindfulness How To
! Mind Training
! Sit comfortably, spine erect, feet on floor
! Close your eyes if it feels comfortable...
Mindfulness How To
! Focusing the mind is easier said than
done
! Requires consistent practice
! Short and frequent
! 5 to...
Mindset
Dr. Carol Dweck:
!
Fixed Mindset
vs.
Growth Mindset
Mindset
Fixed Mindset:
!
Believe traits are fixed
or unchangeable
!
Quantity of talent or
intelligence finite
Mindset
Growth Mindset:
!
Believe traits can be
developed w/ effort
!
Accomplishment
comes from practice
and learning
Thinking about
Thinking
Students must think
about how the way
they think and what
they think affects
their success.
Self-Regulate:
Affect
Influence
"On a clean sheet of paper, list the past five
years vertically (2011, 2010, 2009…).
"Next to each year, list th...
Significant Influence
"When you reflect on your experience, do
you find that you had more control than you
thought?
"Stude...
Being in the Moment
• Can you change the past?
!
• What are you doing now that is working?
How can you do more of the same...
Reframe…
• I am successful because I am smart
• People like me because I am attractive
• I get opportunities because I am ...
Blocks to Feeling in Control
• Motivated self-deception
– Denying a state exists to reduce anxiety
– “Oh, that is not due ...
Blocks to Feeling in Control
• Accessibility difficulties
– More processing required to form an attitude,
more apt to lose...
Sensory  Sensi.vity  of  GiWed
• Tested  giWed  vs.  normed  sample  on  the  
Sensory  Profile  (Dunn,  1999)  
• Significa...
Why address sensory sensitivity?
• Sensory stimuli create CNS arousal which
places demands upon the body
• The intensity a...
Why address sensory sensitivity?
• To reduce stressors
• To positively enhance the experience of the
highly sensitive gift...
80
angelahousand.com
&
Internalizing  Mo.va.on
(Deci  &  Ryan,  1995;  Ryan  &  Deci,  2000)
Amo.va.on
Intrinsic  
Mo.va.on
External
Regulation
I...
Parents  and  students  
rate  controlling  teachers  as    
significantly  
more  competent  than  
autonomy-­‐suppor.ve  ...
Apathy
Flow  Channel
Increasing  Skills
Increasing  Skills
Increasing  Challenge
Increasing  Challenge
To Experience FLOW...
...one must	

loose one’s sense of self.
Self-Regulate:
Affect
Self-Regulate:
Behavior
Regulation, Motivation
& Engagement
in the Digital Age
Regulation
Motivation &
Engagement
in the Digital Age
Pew Research Center, 2010
Past Generations
Halligan (opinion), 2013
Past Generations
Halligan (opinion), 2013
Millennials
Past Generations
Halligan (opinion), 2013
Millennials
Halligan (opinion), 2013
Pew Research Center, 2010
10276
(Internet World Stats, 2009)
342%
(De Moor, 2008)
93%
(NPR March 16, 2011)
80%
Halligan (opinion), 2013
Halligan (opinion), 2013
Person	
  Environment	
  Fit
• Person  /  Environment  fit  is  the  degree  to  which  
a  person  or  their  personality ...
Good	
  Environmental	
  Fit	
  Occurs	
  When:
A  person  adjusts  to  their  surroundings  
AND  
Adapts  the  environme...
Why  Do  We  
Ask  Kids  To  
UNPLUG  At  
School?
From the standpoint
of the child…he is
unable to apply in
daily life what he is
learning at school.
That is the isolation
...
Informa=on	
  Overload
Cogni.ve  overs.mula.on  that  
interferes  with  our  ability  to  “think”  
!
(Toffler,  1970,  p. ...
• Accelerating rate of new
information	

• Ease of duplication and
transmission	

• Increase in the available
sources of i...
Anxiety May Result
1. IdentifyYour Priorities
2. Set Goals
3. Manage Time & Materials
4. Be Discerning
5. Reflect & Evaluate
5 Easy Steps...
Identify Your Priorities
Step 1
Writing Prompt
# I would like to improve…
# Some people are unhappy with…
# I want to learn more about…
# An idea I would ...
Writing Prompt Helps Students
$ Identify priorities
$ Identify areas for improvement
and focused effort
$ Attain truthful ...
Google Calendar Supports
$ Time management
$ Sequencing
# Setting Priorities
# Notification of Deadlines
What is your personal definition
of success?
Set Goals
Step 2
Activity Time:
S.W. O.T.
S
TO
W
Helpful	

to achieving the
objective
Harmful
to achieving the
objective
Internal Origin 	

!
Attributes of the
Indi...
© Angela Housand, 2013
© Angela Housand, 2013
Strengths
What unique skills do I have?	

What do I do well?	

What resources do I have available?	

Who do I know that ca...
Weaknesses
What areas do I need to improve?	

What do others view as my weakness or area for
improvement?	

What is someth...
Opportunities
What opportunities are already available to me?	

How can I use my strengths to create opportunities for
mys...
Threats
What could hinder my success?	

What are potential problems I could encounter?	

What are the challenges I face?	
...
S
M
A
T
R
pecific
easureable
ttainable
ealistic
ime-bound
Effective Goal Setting:
More Than SMART
Prioritized
Reviewed Periodically
Revised as Needed
Accountable to Others
Effective Goal Setting:
More Than SMART
Periodically review
goals and modify to
reflect changing
priorities and
experiences.
Effective Goal Setting:
More Than SMART
Share your goals and
engage with successful,
motivated people who
also set goals.
Avoid Unrealistic Goals
! Insufficient Information
! Goals Set by Other People
! Always Expecting Best
The greater danger for most of
us lies not in setting our aim too
high and falling short;
!
but in setting our aim too low...
Why Goal Setting?
Planned  direc+on  for  efforts  
Provides  clarity  for  assessment  
Opportunity  to  take  responsibil...
www.liftinternational.com
Privacy &
Security
Categorize for
different types of
goals.
What steps will I
take to achieve my
goal?
Accountability:
Share
Reminders
Monitor
Progress
Reflect &
Evaluate
Goal attainment is
not luck, 



Goal attainment is
not luck, 

it takes time and
requires effort.

Cyclical
&
Ongoing
What does
goal setting
look like for
adults?
Evolution of Goal Setting
Formal Goal Setting The “TO DO” List
Written
Completion Check Box
Deadline Driven
Prioritized
Re...
DO’s and DON’Ts
of To Do Lists
Goal Setting Plan (Based on Heacox, 1991)
1. What is one area of your class performance that you really want to improve? (...
What school related goals would you like to work toward
during the next grading period?
a.
b.
c.
!
During this school year...
Staying the Course
Periodically review goals and
modify to reflect changing
priorities and experience!
!
Involve others in ...
Staying the Course
Engage with successful,
motivated people who also set
goals!
!
Maintain visual reminders!
Collage!
Digi...
Cyclical and Ongoing
• Achieved easily, make next goal harder
• Took to long to achieve, make next goal
a little easier
• If something was lear...
Attainment
! Demonstrates forward progress
! Measure and take pride in the
achievement
! Celebrate and enjoy the satisfact...
Manage Time & Materials
Step 3
Infrastructure
Infrastructure
Infrastructure
Infrastructure
Or  is  it  an  apen
(Valcke, et al, 2008)
91%
Measuring Time on Task
SET A GOAL
TAKE A BREAK
STAY ON TARGET
REWARD YOURSELF
Calendar Ideas for Students
•Task monitoring
•Set “reminders”
•Use with Drive
•Track project timelines
•Organize Task Lists
!
• Create group calendars	

• Provide assignment due dates	

• Set project timelines	

• Existing location for parent
inf...
BE EFFICIENT
Managing the Madness of Email
ESTABLISH EMAIL TIME ZONES  
STRIVE TO ONLY TOUCH IT ONCE  
DOES YOUR PHONE REALLY HELP?  
D...
“GET YOURSELF A FOLDER.”
My Library• Annotate,  Archive,  Organize
My Network• Build  a  Personal  Learning  Network
My Groups• Create  a  Group  K...
Dropbox is software that syncs your files
online and across your computers.
How Much Space?
2GB FREE
Install on
another
computer.
Share
a
folder.
Invite
a friend or
colleague.
Install
on your
phone.
I
Shout Out!

Give me a number between 1 and 10…

Intended Project(s):
How, when, and where
will you share and
communicate the results of
your project with other
people?
!
...
Getting Started:
!
What skills, resources and
materials will I need?
!
Who is the intended
audience?
Timeline:
•Start Date
•Completion Date
•Progress Report
•Dates
!
•Meetings with the
teacher!
Organizational Strategies
• The Environment
" Specific location for work
" Location should be distraction-free
" Set aside ...
Organizational Strategies
• The Environment
" Specific location for work
" Location should be distraction-free
" Set aside ...
Organizational Strategies
• The Environment
" Specific location for work, but realize the
digital environment is complex
" ...
Think Mobility
Honor Diversity of Style
Help students find an organizational
system the fits their “style”!
Encourage them to develop their...
Be Discerning
Step 4
Do I really need this tool or
information?
# Be a purposeful adopter
# Specialize in your needs
# Right tool right job
“Every man
should have a
built-in
automatic
crap detector
operating
inside of him.”
+
5 Types of Evaluation
1. Understanding
2. Relevancy
3. Accuracy
4. Reliability
5. Bias
(Coiro, 2006)
221
Reflect & Evaluate
Step 5
Students Ask:
! Did I accomplish what I planned to do?
! Was I distracted?
! Limit times you answer emails
! Delay of grat...
Students Ask:
! What worked well?
! Are certain technologies easier for me to
adopt?
! Are some more appropriate than othe...
5 EASY STEPS!
1. Identify Your
Priorities
2. Set Goals
3. Manage Time &
Materials
4. Be Discerning
5. Reflect &
Evaluate
Shout Out!

Give me a number between 1 and 10…

Self-Regulate
Cognition
Metacognition
! One’s knowledge of his or her own
cognitive processes or anything related
to them (Flavell, 1976)
!
! Know...
Thinking about Achieving
• What skills do I need to achieve this?
• What help or assistance do I need?
• What resources do...
Self-Evaluating
# What does the teacher want me
to do?
# What do I want out of it?
# What did I learn today?
# What did I ...
Reflecting on Achievement
• Did I accomplish what I planned to
achieve?
• Was I distracted and how did I get back to
my ta...
Individualized Projects
• What will I need to work
on my project?
• Where will I work?
• Who will I work with?
• What might hinder my
process?
• Am I accomplishing
what I planned?
• Is this taking longer than
I thought?
• Am I on task or am I
being distracted?
• Did I accomplish what I
planned to do?
• Was I distracted and how
did I get back to work?
• Did I plan enough time or
di...
Teacher Strategy
! Encourage risk-taking
!
! Ensure that students are
sufficiently challenged so they
have opportunities t...
Teacher Strategy
! Encourage risk-taking
!
! Ensure that students are
sufficiently challenged so they
have opportunities t...
Engage
10,000
Smithsonian American Art Museum
E
NDURINGLY
NGAGING
XPERIENCES
ALITTLE
GAMIFICATION
“While most games contain a clear reward system for players (moving up a level, receiving badges or points, etc.),
what ma...
GAMIFICATION: !
The use of game
elements and
game-design
techniques in
non-game
contexts.
POINTS BADGES LEADER
BOARDS
POINTS
Effectively Keep Score
Determine WIN State
Connection Between Progress
and Reward
Provide Feedback
External Display...
BADGES
Goals to Strive Toward
Guidance About Possibilities
Visual Markers of
Accomplishment
Status Symbols
Tribal Markers
LEADER
BOARDS
ENGAGE
GAMIFICATION OFFERS CHOICE
COLLABORATION
CONTENT
CHOICE
-Alfie Kohn
DEFINE LEARNING
OBJECTIVES
2. Delineate Target Behaviors
DELINEATE TARGET BEHAVIORS
DESCRIBE YOUR PLAYERS
DEVISE !
ACTIVITY
CYCLES
DON’T
FORGET
THE
FUN!
DEPLOY
APPROPRIATE
TOOLS
267
Motivation	

(Malone & Lepper, 1987)
Self-
Determination	

(Deci & Ryan, 1980; 2000)
Supporting	

Autonomy
FLOW	

(Csiksze...
Motivation	

(Malone & Lepper, 1987)
FLOW	

(Csikszentmihalyi, 1975)
Learning
Contracts
Gamification	

(McGonigal, 2010)
Cu...
272
!
PLATFORMSFOR
GAMIFICATION
Watson College of Education
Angela Housand, Ph.D.
housanda@uncw.edu
STAR
Legacy
CHALLENGE
PERSPECTIVES
& RESOURCES
THOUGHTS
ASSESSMENT
WRAP UP
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Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage
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Helping students self motivate, self-regulate, and engage

  1. 1. Helping Students Self-Motivate, Self- Regulate and Engage in a Digital Age ! Angela M. Housand, Ph. D. University of North Carolina Wilmington Confratute - University of Connecticut
  2. 2. angelahousand.com &
  3. 3. www.gi%ed.uconn.edu The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented
  4. 4. This Week I Have the Honor…
  5. 5. Self-Motivate
  6. 6. Motivation To be motivated means to be moved to do something
  7. 7. Motivation (Malone & Lepper, 1987) Curiosity Control Optimal Challenge Fantasy Interpersonal (Cooperation, Competition, & Recognition)
  8. 8. • Curious • Independent • Attracted to complexity • Originality in thought and action • Willing to take risks • Aware of their own creativeness • Need to produce Creatively Gifted
  9. 9. Motivation is Complex Perception of Competence Experience of Autonomy Sense of Control Willingness to Pursue Goals Persistence when Challenged Enjoyment or Interest
  10. 10. Internalizing  Mo.va.on (Deci  &  Ryan,  1995;  Ryan  &  Deci,  2000) Amo.va.on Intrinsic   Mo.va.on
  11. 11. Internalizing  Mo4va4on:
 External  Regula.on External Regulation Externally motivated Punishment/ Reward Compliance (Deci  &  Ryan,  1995;  Ryan  &  Deci,  2000)
  12. 12. Internalizing  Mo4va4on:
 Introjec.on External Regulation Externally motivated Punishment/ Reward Compliance Introjection ! Act to gain approval Do not fully understand purpose (Deci  &  Ryan,  1995;  Ryan  &  Deci,  2000)
  13. 13. Internalizing  Mo4va4on:
 Iden.fica.on External Regulation Externally motivated Punishment/ Reward Compliance Introjection ! Act to gain approval Do not fully understand purpose Identification ! Behaviors become personally important (Deci  &  Ryan,  1995;  Ryan  &  Deci,  2000)
  14. 14. • Tied to Student’s Identity • Personally Interesting • Integral to the Student’s Vision of the future • Viewed as Useful (Eccles & Wigfield) Personally Meaningful
  15. 15. Internalizing  Mo4va4on:
 Integra.on External Regulation Externally motivated Punishment/ Reward Compliance Introjection ! Act to gain approval Do not fully understand purpose Identification ! Behaviors become personally important Integration ! Behaviors become central to self-identity (Deci  &  Ryan,  1995;  Ryan  &  Deci,  2000)
  16. 16. Internalizing  Mo.va.on (Deci  &  Ryan,  1995;  Ryan  &  Deci,  2000) Amo.va.on Intrinsic   Mo.va.on External Regulation Introjection ! Identification ! Integration !
  17. 17. Intrinsic Motivation (Self-Determination Theory) Perception of Competence Experience of Autonomy Sense of Control Willingness to Pursue Goals Persistence when Challenged Enjoyment or Interest Relatedness
  18. 18. RELATEDNESS... Feeling connected to others and having a sense of belonging to a community.
  19. 19. COMPETENCE… Ability to demonstrate one’s capacity for success when faced with a challenge or opportunity.
  20. 20. COMPETENCE… Feelings of competence shape a person’s willingness to actively engage and persist in different behaviors. (Bandura 1986, 1997)
  21. 21. Self-efficacy influences: ! What activities we select ! How much effort we put forth ! How persistent we are in the face of difficulties ! The difficulty of the goals we set
  22. 22. Increasing Self-efficacy ! Past performance ! Vicarious experiences (observing others perform) ! Verbal persuasion  ! Physiological cues
  23. 23. Autonomy The more autonomous (self- determined) a person believes their behavior to be the greater the personal satisfaction and enjoyment from engaging in that behavior.
  24. 24. Autonomous Learners • Achieve highly • Learn conceptually • Stay in school (Reeve, 2002)
  25. 25. Autonomous Learners (Reeve, 2002) • Achieve highly • Learn conceptually • Stay in school ! • In large part, because their teachers support their autonomy rather than control their behavior
  26. 26. ONTARGET Autonomously-Motivated Students
 vs.
 Control-Motivated Students • Higher academic achievement • Higher perceived competence • More positive emotionality • Higher self-worth (Reeve, 2002)
  27. 27. ONTARGET Autonomously-Motivated Students
 vs.
 Control-Motivated Students (Reeve, 2002) • Preference for optimal challenge • Enjoy optimal challenge • Stronger perceptions of control • Greater creativity • Higher rates of retention
  28. 28. ONTARGET Educational Benefits of Autonomy-Supportive Teachers (Reeve, 2002) • Higher academic achievement • Higher perceived competence • More positive emotionality • Higher self-esteem
  29. 29. ONTARGET Educational Benefits of Autonomy-Supportive Teachers (Reeve, 2002) • Greater conceptual understanding • Greater flexibility in thinking • More information processing • Greater creativity • Higher rates of retention
  30. 30. ONTARGET In Short… (Reeve, 2002) • Autonomously motivated students thrive in educational settings ! • Students benefit when teachers support their autonomy
  31. 31. • Autonomy support is not: –Permissiveness –Neglect –Independence –Laissez-faire interaction style Avoid Misconceptions
  32. 32. Avoid Misconceptions • Autonomy support and structure are two different classroom elements which have different aims and different effects • They are NOT the same, but can be mutually supportive
  33. 33. • Spend less time holding instructional materials • Provide time for independent work • Provide hints but resist giving answers • Encourage conversation • Listen – even more than you do now Tips for Teachers
  34. 34. • In conversation w/ students • Praise mastery • Respond to student generated questions • Make statements that are empathetic and rich in perspective taking Tips for Teachers
  35. 35. • Avoid • Directives or “Taking Charge” • Steering students toward a right answer • Being critical or evaluative • Motivating through external rewards • Motivating through pressure Tips for Teachers
  36. 36. Parents  and  students   rate  controlling  teachers  as     significantly   more  competent  than   autonomy-­‐suppor.ve  teachers.
  37. 37. Motivation (Malone & Lepper, 1987) Self-Determination (Deci & Ryan, 1980; 2000) Curiosity Goal Pursuit Control Autonomy Optimal Challenge Competence Fantasy Achievement Interpersonal (Cooperation, Competition, & Recognition) Relatedness
  38. 38. Thinking about Achieving • What skills do I need to achieve this? • What help or assistance do I need? • What resources do I need? • What can block progress? • How will I maintain focus in order to achieve this?
  39. 39. Reflecting on Achievement • Did I accomplish what I planned to achieve? • Was I distracted and how did I get back to my task? • Did I plan enough time? • In which situation did I accomplish the most?
  40. 40. LEARNING CONTRACTS
  41. 41. Clear  Expecta4ons Authen4c  Audience
  42. 42. A  Timeline  with   Feedback  Opportuni4es  Built-­‐in
  43. 43. Clear  Content  &  Resources Accountability
  44. 44. Clear  Strategies  &  Skills Accountability
  45. 45. • Agreement  between  teacher  &  student   • Student  independence  &  autonomy   • Increased  student  responsibility   • Provides  freedom  in  acquiring  skills
  46. 46. Motivation (Malone & Lepper, 1987) Self- Determination (Deci & Ryan, 1980; 2000) Learning Contracts Curiosity Goal Pursuit Clear Expectations Control Autonomy Benchmarks & Defined Responsibility Optimal Challenge Competence Defined Content & Skills Fantasy Achievement Achievement Interpersonal (Cooperation, Competition, & Recognition) Relatedness Authentic Audience
  47. 47. Learning  contracts  allow   students  to  work  on  a   process  that  extends  over   .me,  requiring  planning,   regula.on  of  effort,   reflec.on,  and  adapta.on   to  successfully  complete.
  48. 48. Mihaly   Csikszentmihalyi
  49. 49. Apathy Flow  Channel
  50. 50. Apathy Flow  Channel Increasing  Skills Increasing  Skills Increasing  Challenge Increasing  Challenge
  51. 51. To Experience FLOW... ...the task must provide clear goals and feedback.
  52. 52. To Experience FLOW... ...one must become immersed in the activity.
  53. 53. To Experience FLOW... ...the task must be challenging and require skill.
  54. 54. To Experience FLOW... ...one must learn to enjoy immediate experience.
  55. 55. Mindfulness ! Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D. ! From the field of behavioral medicine ! Used to control ! Stress ! Pain ! Illness ! Initial research conducted at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center
  56. 56. Mindfulness Attitudes ! Non-judging ! Impartial witness to our own experience ! Cultivates emotional intelligence ! Patience ! Things unfold in their own time ! Delay of gratification ! Beginner’s Mind ! What we think we “know” impedes understanding ! Avoiding pre-conceived notions
  57. 57. Emotional Intelligence The ability to monitor one’s own and other’s feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them and to use that information to guide one’s thinking and actions. ! (Salovey & Mayer, 1990, p. 189)
  58. 58. Mindfulness Attitudes ! Trust ! Developing a trust of yourself and your feelings ! Non-striving ! Seems counter intuitive ! Focusing on being clarifies what to strive for ! Acceptance ! Seeing things as they are ! Enables one to act appropriately no matter what is happening around them
  59. 59. Mindfulness Attitudes ! Letting Go ! Put aside the tendency to elevate some life experiences and reject others ! Cultivates emotional intelligence ! ! Mindfulness is mind training. ! “I am not thinking about that right now, I am observing – training my mind” ! “I am here to work on my mind”
  60. 60. Goal of Mindfulness ! Achieve a state of stability and calm ! Increase self-discipline ! Increase feelings of well-being ! Reduce feelings of dysphoria ! Increase self-awareness
  61. 61. Mindfulness How To ! Release Tension ! Sit comfortably, spine erect, feet on floor ! Allow arms to hang straight down with hands about 10-12 inches from body ! Close your eyes if it feels comfortable ! Identify areas of tension in your mind or body ! As you identify areas of tension, allow them to dissolve and flow down the arms and out the finger tips
  62. 62. Mindfulness How To ! Mind Training ! Sit comfortably, spine erect, feet on floor ! Close your eyes if it feels comfortable ! Bring your attention to your breath ! Nose, mouth, lungs, or belly – wherever you sense your breath ! Do not control breath, just observe ! Maintain your attention on your breathing ! When your mind wanders, simply let the thought go and return your focus to your breath
  63. 63. Mindfulness How To ! Focusing the mind is easier said than done ! Requires consistent practice ! Short and frequent ! 5 to 15 minutes daily ! Don’t force it! ! When students loose focus, the time is up ! Work to extend time each day
  64. 64. Mindset Dr. Carol Dweck: ! Fixed Mindset vs. Growth Mindset
  65. 65. Mindset Fixed Mindset: ! Believe traits are fixed or unchangeable ! Quantity of talent or intelligence finite
  66. 66. Mindset Growth Mindset: ! Believe traits can be developed w/ effort ! Accomplishment comes from practice and learning
  67. 67. Thinking about Thinking Students must think about how the way they think and what they think affects their success.
  68. 68. Self-Regulate: Affect
  69. 69. Influence "On a clean sheet of paper, list the past five years vertically (2011, 2010, 2009…). "Next to each year, list the most important event that occurred in your life during that year. "Estimate the percentage of control or influence you had over each event.
  70. 70. Significant Influence "When you reflect on your experience, do you find that you had more control than you thought? "Students may feel that external forces control their lives. "Modify the exercise: "Last five months "Last five weeks
  71. 71. Being in the Moment • Can you change the past? ! • What are you doing now that is working? How can you do more of the same? ! • When you had a problem like this one before, what good solutions did you work out? Or Have you ever helped someone with a problem like this before?
  72. 72. Reframe… • I am successful because I am smart • People like me because I am attractive • I get opportunities because I am lucky • I make mistakes because I am a failure • I never win because I am a loser • I get in trouble because the teacher does not like me
  73. 73. Blocks to Feeling in Control • Motivated self-deception – Denying a state exists to reduce anxiety – “Oh, that is not due until next week.” – A month long project • Inaccurate verbalization – Convinced they feel something the do not – “I hate school!”
  74. 74. Blocks to Feeling in Control • Accessibility difficulties – More processing required to form an attitude, more apt to lose track of what the attitude is – “I used to be good at math, but the teacher is giving me a bad grade so I obviously am not good at math.”
  75. 75. Sensory  Sensi.vity  of  GiWed • Tested  giWed  vs.  normed  sample  on  the   Sensory  Profile  (Dunn,  1999)   • Significant  differences  on  12  of  14  sensory   sec.ons  between  groups   • GiWed  children  are  more  sensi.ve  to  their   physical  environment   • More  affected  by  sensory  s.muli  
  76. 76. Why address sensory sensitivity? • Sensory stimuli create CNS arousal which places demands upon the body • The intensity and duration of arousal affect responses to stimuli • Maximum and prolonged overload of information can be stressful
  77. 77. Why address sensory sensitivity? • To reduce stressors • To positively enhance the experience of the highly sensitive gifted individual • To be responsive to unique needs • To promote healthy working environments • To increase the sustainability of focus and effort in productive endeavors
  78. 78. 80
  79. 79. angelahousand.com &
  80. 80. Internalizing  Mo.va.on (Deci  &  Ryan,  1995;  Ryan  &  Deci,  2000) Amo.va.on Intrinsic   Mo.va.on External Regulation Introjection ! Identification ! Integration !
  81. 81. Parents  and  students   rate  controlling  teachers  as     significantly   more  competent  than   autonomy-­‐suppor.ve  teachers.
  82. 82. Apathy Flow  Channel Increasing  Skills Increasing  Skills Increasing  Challenge Increasing  Challenge
  83. 83. To Experience FLOW... ...one must loose one’s sense of self.
  84. 84. Self-Regulate: Affect
  85. 85. Self-Regulate: Behavior
  86. 86. Regulation, Motivation & Engagement in the Digital Age
  87. 87. Regulation Motivation & Engagement in the Digital Age
  88. 88. Pew Research Center, 2010
  89. 89. Past Generations Halligan (opinion), 2013
  90. 90. Past Generations Halligan (opinion), 2013
  91. 91. Millennials
  92. 92. Past Generations Halligan (opinion), 2013
  93. 93. Millennials Halligan (opinion), 2013
  94. 94. Pew Research Center, 2010
  95. 95. 10276
  96. 96. (Internet World Stats, 2009) 342%
  97. 97. (De Moor, 2008) 93%
  98. 98. (NPR March 16, 2011) 80%
  99. 99. Halligan (opinion), 2013
  100. 100. Halligan (opinion), 2013
  101. 101. Person  Environment  Fit • Person  /  Environment  fit  is  the  degree  to  which   a  person  or  their  personality  is  compa.ble  with   their  environment
  102. 102. Good  Environmental  Fit  Occurs  When: A  person  adjusts  to  their  surroundings   AND   Adapts  the  environment  to  fit  their  needs
  103. 103. Why  Do  We   Ask  Kids  To   UNPLUG  At   School?
  104. 104. From the standpoint of the child…he is unable to apply in daily life what he is learning at school. That is the isolation of the school - its isolation from life. -John Dewey
  105. 105. Informa=on  Overload Cogni.ve  overs.mula.on  that   interferes  with  our  ability  to  “think”   ! (Toffler,  1970,  p.  350)
  106. 106. • Accelerating rate of new information • Ease of duplication and transmission • Increase in the available sources of information • Contradictions and inaccuracies • Lacking strategies to process information Informa=on  Overload
  107. 107. Anxiety May Result
  108. 108. 1. IdentifyYour Priorities 2. Set Goals 3. Manage Time & Materials 4. Be Discerning 5. Reflect & Evaluate 5 Easy Steps...
  109. 109. Identify Your Priorities Step 1
  110. 110. Writing Prompt # I would like to improve… # Some people are unhappy with… # I want to learn more about… # An idea I would like to try… # Something I think would really make a difference is… # Something I would like to change is…
  111. 111. Writing Prompt Helps Students $ Identify priorities $ Identify areas for improvement and focused effort $ Attain truthful self-awareness
  112. 112. Google Calendar Supports $ Time management $ Sequencing # Setting Priorities # Notification of Deadlines
  113. 113. What is your personal definition of success?
  114. 114. Set Goals Step 2
  115. 115. Activity Time: S.W. O.T.
  116. 116. S TO W Helpful to achieving the objective Harmful to achieving the objective Internal Origin ! Attributes of the Individual Strengths Weaknesses External Origin ! Attributes of the Environment Opportunities Threats SWOT Analysis
  117. 117. © Angela Housand, 2013
  118. 118. © Angela Housand, 2013
  119. 119. Strengths What unique skills do I have? What do I do well? What resources do I have available? Who do I know that can help me? What experiences have I had that will help me as I move forward? © Angela Housand, 2013
  120. 120. Weaknesses What areas do I need to improve? What do others view as my weakness or area for improvement? What is something I would like to change? © Angela Housand, 2013
  121. 121. Opportunities What opportunities are already available to me? How can I use my strengths to create opportunities for myself? Who might be willing to help me? © Angela Housand, 2013
  122. 122. Threats What could hinder my success? What are potential problems I could encounter? What are the challenges I face? What are the restrictions in my life (time, money, vehicle, access to computer or the Internet, etc.)? © Angela Housand, 2013
  123. 123. S M A T R pecific easureable ttainable ealistic ime-bound
  124. 124. Effective Goal Setting: More Than SMART Prioritized Reviewed Periodically Revised as Needed Accountable to Others
  125. 125. Effective Goal Setting: More Than SMART Periodically review goals and modify to reflect changing priorities and experiences.
  126. 126. Effective Goal Setting: More Than SMART Share your goals and engage with successful, motivated people who also set goals.
  127. 127. Avoid Unrealistic Goals ! Insufficient Information ! Goals Set by Other People ! Always Expecting Best
  128. 128. The greater danger for most of us lies not in setting our aim too high and falling short; ! but in setting our aim too low, and achieving our mark. -Michelangelo
  129. 129. Why Goal Setting? Planned  direc+on  for  efforts   Provides  clarity  for  assessment   Opportunity  to  take  responsibility
  130. 130. www.liftinternational.com
  131. 131. Privacy & Security
  132. 132. Categorize for different types of goals.
  133. 133. What steps will I take to achieve my goal?
  134. 134. Accountability: Share Reminders
  135. 135. Monitor Progress
  136. 136. Reflect & Evaluate
  137. 137. Goal attainment is not luck, 
 

  138. 138. Goal attainment is not luck, 
 it takes time and requires effort.

  139. 139. Cyclical & Ongoing
  140. 140. What does goal setting look like for adults?
  141. 141. Evolution of Goal Setting Formal Goal Setting The “TO DO” List Written Completion Check Box Deadline Driven Prioritized Revised Regularly Its Your Job SpecificWritten Measureable Time Bound Prioritized Periodically Reviewed Accountable to Others
  142. 142. DO’s and DON’Ts of To Do Lists
  143. 143. Goal Setting Plan (Based on Heacox, 1991) 1. What is one area of your class performance that you really want to improve? (This is your long term goal. It may take you several weeks, months, or even a whole school year to improve this goal.) This goal is important to me because: 2. What is one thing that you can do NOW to help you reach your long-term goal? (This is your short- term goal. You should be able to accomplish this goal in 2-4 weeks.) 3. What steps do you need to reach your short-term goal? 4. What things or people might keep you from reaching your goal? These are your obstacles. 5. What can you do to get around your obstacles? These are your solutions. 7. What special materials or help do you need to reach your goal? These are your resources. 8. How will you reward yourself when you achieve your goal? These are your incentives. 9. How and when will you check on your progress toward your goal? Who will help you to check on your progress? Checkpoint 1 Date: ____________________________________________________ Checkpoint 2 Date: ____________________________________________________ 
 I am committed to working toward achieving my short term goal. Student's signature: Today's date: Witness (Teacher's) signature:
  144. 144. What school related goals would you like to work toward during the next grading period? a. b. c. ! During this school year? a. b. ! After high school? a. b. ! What personal goals would you like to achieve in the next six months? a. b. c. ! Within the next year or two? a. b. How do you expect to achieve these goals? a. b. c. ! ! a. b. ! ! a. b. ! How do you hope to achieve these goals? a. b. c. ! a. b. GoalSettingor… WHEREDOYOUWANTTOGO AND HOWDOYOUPLANTOGETTHERE? From Motivating Achievers, Carolyn Coil, Pieces of Learning
  145. 145. Staying the Course Periodically review goals and modify to reflect changing priorities and experience! ! Involve others in the goal: Inform, discuss, and share
  146. 146. Staying the Course Engage with successful, motivated people who also set goals! ! Maintain visual reminders! Collage! Digital Reminders
  147. 147. Cyclical and Ongoing
  148. 148. • Achieved easily, make next goal harder • Took to long to achieve, make next goal a little easier • If something was learned that leads to need for revision of other goals, do so • If skills were lacking, set goals to learn necessary skills Setting a New Goal
  149. 149. Attainment ! Demonstrates forward progress ! Measure and take pride in the achievement ! Celebrate and enjoy the satisfaction of achievement ! Set a new goal
  150. 150. Manage Time & Materials Step 3
  151. 151. Infrastructure
  152. 152. Infrastructure
  153. 153. Infrastructure
  154. 154. Infrastructure
  155. 155. Or  is  it  an  apen
  156. 156. (Valcke, et al, 2008) 91%
  157. 157. Measuring Time on Task
  158. 158. SET A GOAL TAKE A BREAK STAY ON TARGET REWARD YOURSELF
  159. 159. Calendar Ideas for Students •Task monitoring •Set “reminders” •Use with Drive •Track project timelines •Organize Task Lists
  160. 160. ! • Create group calendars • Provide assignment due dates • Set project timelines • Existing location for parent information Uses for Google Calendar
  161. 161. BE EFFICIENT
  162. 162. Managing the Madness of Email ESTABLISH EMAIL TIME ZONES   STRIVE TO ONLY TOUCH IT ONCE   DOES YOUR PHONE REALLY HELP?   DO NOT CONTRIBUTE TO JUNK MAIL
  163. 163. “GET YOURSELF A FOLDER.”
  164. 164. My Library• Annotate,  Archive,  Organize My Network• Build  a  Personal  Learning  Network My Groups• Create  a  Group  Knowledge  Repository Community• Research,  Share,  Collaborate
  165. 165. Dropbox is software that syncs your files online and across your computers.
  166. 166. How Much Space? 2GB FREE Install on another computer. Share a folder. Invite a friend or colleague. Install on your phone.
  167. 167. I
  168. 168. Shout Out!
 Give me a number between 1 and 10…

  169. 169. Intended Project(s): How, when, and where will you share and communicate the results of your project with other people? ! What Format Will Your Project Take? What will your product be? ! Project Description: What do you hope to find out or learn?
  170. 170. Getting Started: ! What skills, resources and materials will I need? ! Who is the intended audience?
  171. 171. Timeline: •Start Date •Completion Date •Progress Report •Dates ! •Meetings with the teacher!
  172. 172. Organizational Strategies • The Environment " Specific location for work " Location should be distraction-free " Set aside a specific time " Daily, regardless of whether there is homework or not " Supplies and resources available and accessible
  173. 173. Organizational Strategies • The Environment " Specific location for work " Location should be distraction-free " Set aside a specific time " Daily, regardless of whether there is homework or not " Supplies and resources available and accessible ! • Still true, but…
  174. 174. Organizational Strategies • The Environment " Specific location for work, but realize the digital environment is complex " Location should be distraction-free " Set aside a specific time, and work to increase focus " Daily, but “down time” is good too " Supplies and resources available online and students need access to the internet
  175. 175. Think Mobility
  176. 176. Honor Diversity of Style Help students find an organizational system the fits their “style”! Encourage them to develop their own systems! Allow trial and error: Have patience to give system ideas a fair chance
  177. 177. Be Discerning Step 4
  178. 178. Do I really need this tool or information? # Be a purposeful adopter # Specialize in your needs # Right tool right job
  179. 179. “Every man should have a built-in automatic crap detector operating inside of him.”
  180. 180. + 5 Types of Evaluation 1. Understanding 2. Relevancy 3. Accuracy 4. Reliability 5. Bias (Coiro, 2006)
  181. 181. 221
  182. 182. Reflect & Evaluate Step 5
  183. 183. Students Ask: ! Did I accomplish what I planned to do? ! Was I distracted? ! Limit times you answer emails ! Delay of gratification ! Did I plan enough time? ! Was I productive or was I spending time figuring out how to use the technology?
  184. 184. Students Ask: ! What worked well? ! Are certain technologies easier for me to adopt? ! Are some more appropriate than others? ! What do I need help with? ! Find a tech buddy. ! What do I still need know?
  185. 185. 5 EASY STEPS! 1. Identify Your Priorities 2. Set Goals 3. Manage Time & Materials 4. Be Discerning 5. Reflect & Evaluate
  186. 186. Shout Out!
 Give me a number between 1 and 10…

  187. 187. Self-Regulate Cognition
  188. 188. Metacognition ! One’s knowledge of his or her own cognitive processes or anything related to them (Flavell, 1976) ! ! Knowledge about when and how to use specific strategies for learning and problem solving
  189. 189. Thinking about Achieving • What skills do I need to achieve this? • What help or assistance do I need? • What resources do I need? • What can block progress? • How will I maintain focus in order to achieve this?
  190. 190. Self-Evaluating # What does the teacher want me to do? # What do I want out of it? # What did I learn today? # What did I do well? # What am I confused about? # What do I need to get help with? # What do I still need to do?
  191. 191. Reflecting on Achievement • Did I accomplish what I planned to achieve? • Was I distracted and how did I get back to my task? • Did I plan enough time? • In which situation did I accomplish the most?
  192. 192. Individualized Projects
  193. 193. • What will I need to work on my project? • Where will I work? • Who will I work with? • What might hinder my process?
  194. 194. • Am I accomplishing what I planned? • Is this taking longer than I thought? • Am I on task or am I being distracted?
  195. 195. • Did I accomplish what I planned to do? • Was I distracted and how did I get back to work? • Did I plan enough time or did it take longer than I thought? • In which situation did I accomplish the most work?
  196. 196. Teacher Strategy ! Encourage risk-taking ! ! Ensure that students are sufficiently challenged so they have opportunities to fail
  197. 197. Teacher Strategy ! Encourage risk-taking ! ! Ensure that students are sufficiently challenged so they have opportunities to fail ! ! YES, let them fail!
  198. 198. Engage
  199. 199. 10,000
  200. 200. Smithsonian American Art Museum
  201. 201. E NDURINGLY NGAGING XPERIENCES
  202. 202. ALITTLE GAMIFICATION
  203. 203. “While most games contain a clear reward system for players (moving up a level, receiving badges or points, etc.), what may be most appealing to educators is that games provide students ! A SAFE PLACE TO LEARN FROM FAILURE. ! In games, exploration is inherent and there are generally no high-stakes consequences. Children are able to ! EXPERIMENT AND TAKE RISKS TO FIND SOLUTIONS ! without the feeling that they are doing something wrong. ! GAMES ENCOURAGE STUDENTS TO MAKE AND LEARN FROM MISTAKES, ! which is a particularly important concept in the K-12 setting.” GAME BASED LEARNING
  204. 204. GAMIFICATION: ! The use of game elements and game-design techniques in non-game contexts.
  205. 205. POINTS BADGES LEADER BOARDS
  206. 206. POINTS Effectively Keep Score Determine WIN State Connection Between Progress and Reward Provide Feedback External Display of Progress Data for Game Designer
  207. 207. BADGES Goals to Strive Toward Guidance About Possibilities Visual Markers of Accomplishment Status Symbols Tribal Markers
  208. 208. LEADER BOARDS
  209. 209. ENGAGE
  210. 210. GAMIFICATION OFFERS CHOICE
  211. 211. COLLABORATION CONTENT CHOICE -Alfie Kohn
  212. 212. DEFINE LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  213. 213. 2. Delineate Target Behaviors DELINEATE TARGET BEHAVIORS
  214. 214. DESCRIBE YOUR PLAYERS
  215. 215. DEVISE ! ACTIVITY CYCLES
  216. 216. DON’T FORGET THE FUN!
  217. 217. DEPLOY APPROPRIATE TOOLS
  218. 218. 267
  219. 219. Motivation (Malone & Lepper, 1987) Self- Determination (Deci & Ryan, 1980; 2000) Supporting Autonomy FLOW (Csikszentmihalyi, 1975) Curiosity Goal Pursuit Clear Expectations Clear Goal Control Autonomy Benchmarks & Defined Responsibility Adjust Performance Based on Optimal Challenge Competence Defined Content & Skills Balance Challenge & Skill Level Fantasy Achievement Achievement Enjoyment Interpersonal (Cooperation, Competition, & Recognition) Relatedness Authentic Audience Transcend Self
  220. 220. Motivation (Malone & Lepper, 1987) FLOW (Csikszentmihalyi, 1975) Learning Contracts Gamification (McGonigal, 2010) Curiosity Clear Goal Clear Expectations Clear Objective Control Adjusted Performance Benchmarks & Responsibility Blissful Productivity Optimal Challenge Balance Challenge & Skill Level Defined Content & Skills Urgent Optimism Fantasy Enjoyment Achievement Epic Win Interpersonal (Cooperation, Competition, & Recognition) Transcend Self Authentic Audience Social Fabric
  221. 221. 272
  222. 222. ! PLATFORMSFOR GAMIFICATION
  223. 223. Watson College of Education Angela Housand, Ph.D. housanda@uncw.edu
  224. 224. STAR Legacy CHALLENGE PERSPECTIVES & RESOURCES THOUGHTS ASSESSMENT WRAP UP
  225. 225. Edmodo is a free, secure, social learning platform for teachers, students, schools, and districts. ! FREE! ! FEATURES: Groups Messages Assignments Calendar Poll ! Student Emails NOT required!
  226. 226. http://help.edmodo.com/teachers/ how-to-createmanage-badges/
  227. 227. http://help.edmodo.com/teachers/ how-to-createmanage-badges/
  228. 228. Questions?

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