Gamification of Education

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Gamification of Education

  1. 1. ANGELA HOUSAND BRIAN HOUSANDbit.ly/nagc2012
  2. 2. AGAMES AND PLAYB MOTIVATIONC contractsD gamificationG PLATFORMS
  3. 3. LEVEL ONE GAMES and PLAY
  4. 4. what is a gameRULES OBJECTIVES OBSTACLES
  5. 5. GAMES GAMES ARE OFFERVOLUNTARY CHOICES CHOICES CONSEQUENCES HAVE OFFER CONSEQUENCES FEEDBACK
  6. 6. FREEDOM TOEXPERIMENTFREEDOM TO FAILFREEDOM TO TRY ONDIFFERENT IDENTITIESFREEDOM OF EFFORT -Scot Osterweil
  7. 7. 10,000
  8. 8. 1) Active, Critical Learning Principle 2) Design Principle 3) Semiotic Principle 4) Semiotic Domains Principle 5) Meta-level thinking about Semiotic Domain Principle 6) "Psychosocial Moratorium" Principle 7) Committed Learning Principle 8) Identity Principle 9) Self-Knowledge Principle10) Amplification of Input Principle11) Achievement Principle12) Practice Principle13) Ongoing Learning Principle14) "Regime of Competence" Principle15) Probing Principle16) Multiple Routes Principle17) Situated Meaning Principle18) Text Principle19) Intertextual Principle20) Multimodal Principle21) "Material Intelligence" Principle22) Intuitive Knowledge Principle23) Subset Principle24) Incremental Principle25) Concentrated Sample Principle26) Bottom-up Basic Skills Principle27) Explicit Information On-Demand and Just-in-Time Principle28) Discovery Principle29) Transfer Principle30) Cultural Models about the World Principle31) Cultural Models about Learning Principle32) Cultural Models about Semiotic Domains Principle33) Distributed Principle34) Dispersed Principle35) Affinity Group Principle36) Insider Principle
  9. 9. Games are the most elevated form of investigation.
  10. 10. LEVEL TWOMOTIVATION AND FLOW
  11. 11. Motivation (Malone & Lepper, 1987) Curiosity Control Optimal Challenge Fantasy Interpersonal(Cooperation, Competition, & Recognition)
  12. 12. Creatively Gifted • Curious • Independent • Attracted to complexity • Originality in thought and action • Willing to take risks • Aware of their own creativeness • Need to produce
  13. 13. Motivation is Complex Perception of Competence Experience of Autonomy Sense of ControlWillingness to Pursue GoalsPersistence when Challenged Enjoyment or Interest
  14. 14. Intrinsic Motivation (Self-Determination Theory) Perception of Competence Experience of Autonomy Sense of ControlWillingness to Pursue GoalsPersistence when Challenged Enjoyment or Interest Relatedness
  15. 15. RELATEDNESS... Feeling connected to others and having a sense of belonging to a community.
  16. 16. COMPETENCE… Ability to demonstrate one’s capacity for success when faced with a challenge or opportunity.
  17. 17. COMPETENCE… Feelings of competence shape a person’s willingness to actively engage and persist in different behaviors. (Bandura 1986, 1997)
  18. 18. AutonomyThe more autonomous(self-determined) a personbelieves their behavior tobe the greater the personalsatisfaction and enjoymentfrom engaging in thatbehavior.
  19. 19. ON TARGET Autonomously-Motivated Students •Higher academic achievement •Higher perceived competence •More positive emotionality •Higher self-worth (Reeve, 2002)
  20. 20. ON TARGET Autonomously-Motivated Students • Preference for optimal challenge • Enjoy engaging challenges • Stronger perceptions of control • Greater creativity • Higher rates of retention (Reeve, 2002)
  21. 21. Motivation Self-Determination (Malone & Lepper, 1987) (Deci & Ryan, 1980; 2000) Curiosity Goal Pursuit Control Autonomy Optimal Challenge Competence Fantasy Achievement Interpersonal Relatedness(Cooperation, Competition, & Recognition)
  22. 22. Mihaly  Csikszentmihalyi
  23. 23. l n ne a  ChF l ow Apathy
  24. 24. To Experience FLOW... ...the task mustprovide clear goals and feedback.
  25. 25. To Experience FLOW... ...one mustbecome immersed in the activity.
  26. 26. To Experience FLOW... ...the task must be challenging and require skill.
  27. 27. To Experience FLOW... ...one mustlearn to enjoy immediate experience.
  28. 28. To Experience FLOW... ...one must loose one’s sense of self.
  29. 29. l n ne a  Ch F l ow Increasing  SkillsIncreasing  Challenge Increasing  Challenge Increasing  Skills Apathy
  30. 30. Motivation FLOW (Malone & Lepper, 1987) (Csikszentmihalyi, 1975) Curiosity Clear Goal Adjust Performance Control Based on Feedback Optimal Challenge Balance Challenge & Skill Level Fantasy Enjoyment Interpersonal Transcend Self(Cooperation, Competition, & Recognition)
  31. 31. LEVEL THREE LEARNING CONTRACTS
  32. 32. Authen,c  AudienceClear  Expecta,ons
  33. 33. A  Timeline  withFeedback  Opportuni,es  Built-­‐in
  34. 34. Clear  Content  &  ResourcesAccountability
  35. 35. Accountability Clear  Strategies  &  Skills
  36. 36. • Agreement  between  teacher  &  student• Student  independence  &  autonomy• Increased  student  responsibility• Provides  freedom  in  acquiring  skills
  37. 37. Motivation FLOW Learning (Malone & Lepper, 1987) (Csikszentmihalyi, 1975) Contracts Curiosity Clear Goal Clear Expectations Adjust Performance Benchmarks & Control Based on Feedback Defined Responsibility Balance Challenge & Defined Content &Optimal Challenge Skill Level Skills Fantasy Enjoyment Achievement Interpersonal(Cooperation, Competition, & Transcend Self Authentic Audience Recognition)
  38. 38. 10,000
  39. 39. Person  Environment  Fit• Person  /  Environment  fit  is  the  degree  to  which  a   person  or  their  personality  is  compa8ble  with  their   environment
  40. 40. Good  Environmental  Fit  Occurs  When: A  person  adjusts  to  their  surroundings AND The  environment  adapts  to  fit  their  needs
  41. 41. Motivation FLOW Learning Gamification(Malone & Lepper, 1987) (Csikszentmihalyi, 1975) Contracts (McGonigal, 2010) Clear Curiosity Clear Goal Clear Objective Expectations Adjusted Benchmarks & Blissful Control Performance Responsibility Productivity Balance Optimal Defined Urgent Challenge & Challenge Content & Skills Optimism Skill Level Fantasy Enjoyment Achievement Epic Win Interpersonal Authentic(Cooperation, Competition, & Transcend Self Social Fabric Recognition) Audience
  42. 42. LEVEL FOURGAMIFICATION
  43. 43. GAME BASED LEARNING “While most games contain a clear reward system for players (moving up a level, receiving badges or points, etc.), what may be most appealing to educators is that games provide studentsA SAFE PLACE TO LEARN FROM FAILURE . In games, exploration is inherent and there are generally no high-stakes consequences. Children are able to EXPERIMENT AND TAKE RISKS TO FIND SOLUTIONS without the feeling that they are doing something wrong. GAMES ENCOURAGE STUDENTS TO MAKE AND LEARN FROM MISTAKES , which is a particularly important concept in the K-12 setting.”
  44. 44. GAMIFICATION:The use of game elements and game-design techniques in non-game contexts.
  45. 45. POINTS BADGES LEADER BOARDS
  46. 46. POINTS Effectively Keep Score Determine WIN StateConnection Between Progress and Reward Provide FeedbackExternal Display of Progress Data for Game Designer
  47. 47. BADGES Goals to Strive TowardGuidance About Possibilities Visual Markers of Accomplishment Status Symbols Tribal Markers
  48. 48. LEADERBOARDS
  49. 49. ENGAGE
  50. 50. GAMIFICATION OFFERS CHOICE
  51. 51. COLLABORATIONCONTENTCHOICE -Alfie Kohn
  52. 52. DEFINE LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  53. 53. DELINEATE TARGET BEHAVIORS 2. Delineate Target Behaviors
  54. 54. DESCRIBE YOUR PLAYERS
  55. 55. DEVISEACTIVITYCYCLES
  56. 56. DON’TFORGET THE FUN!
  57. 57. DEPLOYAPPROPRIATE TOOLS
  58. 58. LEVEL FIVEPLATFORMS FORGAMIFICATION
  59. 59. CHALLENGEWRAP UP THOUGHTS STAR Legacy PERSPECTIVES ASSESSMENT & RESOURCES
  60. 60. ROAD TOGIFTED
  61. 61. Edmodo is a free, secure, social learning platformfor teachers, students, schools, and districts.FREE!FEATURES: Groups Messages Assignments Calendar PollStudent Emails NOT required!
  62. 62. http://help.edmodo.com/teachers/ how-to-createmanage-badges/
  63. 63. http://help.edmodo.com/teachers/ how-to-createmanage-badges/
  64. 64. GAME OVER ?????
  65. 65. Smithsonian American Art Museum
  66. 66. ENDURINGLYNGAGINGXPERIENCES
  67. 67. 92
  68. 68. COMPUTER USE INTERNET USE CREATIVITY CELL PHONE USE VIDEO GAME PLAYJackson, L. A., Witt, E. A., Games, A. I., Fitzgerald, H. E., von Eye, A., & Zhao, Y. (2012). Information technology use and creativity: Findings from the Children and technology Project. Computers in Human Behavior, 28(2), 370-376.
  69. 69. VIDEO GAME PLAY CREATIVITYJackson, L. A., Witt, E. A., Games, A. I., Fitzgerald, H. E., von Eye, A., & Zhao, Y. (2012). Information technology use and creativity: Findings from the Children and technology Project. Computers in Human Behavior, 28(2), 370-376.
  70. 70. GAME ON!

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