In Case You Were Sleeping...


  What you might have touched on (or slept through) in K-11
     that is important to know ...
Who do you have to blame
for having to take this class?
  How about:

      Philosophers (Thomas Hobbes and John Locke in ...
What Background Information
is Important for this Course?
  Glad you ask. The following background
  information is import...
Why did Hobbes fix things so that
Calvin now has to take American
         Government?



In Leviathan Thomas Hobbes argued...
Whatʼs Hobbes, Got to do, Got to Do With It?




   That person, Hobbes argued, was the sovereign. The people
   gave up t...
Hobbes said We (the people, in
 order to form a more perfect union)
Didnʼt Have the Right to Revolt. So?
  So: Hobbes argu...
Pop and Locke:
                John Locke in Second Treatise on Civil Government
                wrote that people in a st...
Pop, Locke, and Drop It.
The rights of man were naturally given, and thus, naturally could not
be taken away by government...
Prelude to Revolution

For a long time, Britain was like a parent who raised their colony
by a policy of benign neglect.

...
Growing Pains
                     Englandʼs “Because I Said So” approach did not go
                     over too well wi...
What do we want?
            Liberty!
      When do we want it?
             Now!
These new house rules pushed the colonis...
The Declaration of
      Independence
This Declaration of Independence formally
stated that America was moving out of the
...
Spoiler Alert: We Won!




General Cornwallis surrenders, treaties are
signed, and the war is over. Now what?

What we wil...
Need
            More?

Please let me know if you need or want to
know more about any topic. I will do my best
to locate r...
Credits
Slide 1: Asleep in Class photo by Hari Bilalic from http://www.flickr.com/photos/haribilalic/2461346638/sizes/
s/ (...
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Implementation Piece1edg6931

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  • Your Notes: Please Also Note Here Any Additional Information You May Need or Any Questions You May Have!




















  • Your Notes: Please Also Note Here Any Additional Information You May Need or Any Questions You May Have!




















  • Your Notes: Please Also Note Here Any Additional Information You May Need or Any Questions You May Have!




















  • Your Notes: Please Also Note Here Any Additional Information You May Need or Any Questions You May Have!




















  • Your Notes: Please Also Note Here Any Additional Information You May Need or Any Questions You May Have!




















  • Your Notes: Please Also Note Here Any Additional Information You May Need or Any Questions You May Have!




















  • Your Notes: Please Also Note Here Any Additional Information You May Need or Any Questions You May Have!




















  • Your Notes: Please Also Note Here Any Additional Information You May Need or Any Questions You May Have!




















  • Your Notes: Please Also Note Here Any Additional Information You May Need or Any Questions You May Have!




















  • Your Notes: Please Also Note Here Any Additional Information You May Need or Any Questions You May Have!




















  • Your Notes: Please Also Note Here Any Additional Information You May Need or Any Questions You May Have!




















  • Your Notes: Please Also Note Here Any Additional Information You May Need or Any Questions You May Have!




















  • Your Notes: Please Also Note Here Any Additional Information You May Need or Any Questions You May Have!




















  • Please list here any any additonal questions or information needed - Compile list from previous slides and post to discussion board. That way I can answer all questions in one place!






















  • Implementation Piece1edg6931

    1. 1. In Case You Were Sleeping... What you might have touched on (or slept through) in K-11 that is important to know for the study of American Government. Keep Your Eyes Open! Mrs. Dolan American Government 1
    2. 2. Who do you have to blame for having to take this class? How about: Philosophers (Thomas Hobbes and John Locke in particular) The American Revolution Those darn Revolutionaries, our Founding Fathers The British (who the darn revolutionaries had to revolt against in the first place) State of Florida (the Florida Statutes mandated that you take this course to graduate) Your parents. Remember, teen angsters, ʻyou didnʼt ask to be bornʼ so technically, this is all their fault. Soon, you will be 18, and experience all the fun that comes with being a legal adult. Including but not limited to: Voting, Registering for the draft, and buying your own toilet paper. Blame your parents while you still can! 2
    3. 3. What Background Information is Important for this Course? Glad you ask. The following background information is important for this course: Working knowledge of (mostly) U.S. History Anything else I say. Just because this class is about democracy doesnʼt mean I have to run it like one. Call me ʻsovereign ruler of American Government classʼ or ʻour fearless leaderʼ. ʻMrs. Dolanʼ works too. 3
    4. 4. Why did Hobbes fix things so that Calvin now has to take American Government? In Leviathan Thomas Hobbes argued that life in the wild was ʻnastyʼ, ʻbrutishʼ, and ʻshortʼ, and governments were formed in order to promote stability, peace and longevity. The people who were counting on these governments in order to be stable and peaceful sought out a ruler who would lead them. They needed someone to coach this football team, so to speak. 4
    5. 5. Whatʼs Hobbes, Got to do, Got to Do With It? That person, Hobbes argued, was the sovereign. The people gave up their sovereignty, or authority, to that leader unconditionally in exchange for peace and stability. To use the football analogy again, the coach does not let players call their own plays. Ever. Hobbesʼ defense of the monarchy (or ruler) provided that the people did not have the right to overthrow an unjust sovereign. It is worth noting that royalty signed Hobbesʼ paychecks. 5
    6. 6. Hobbes said We (the people, in order to form a more perfect union) Didnʼt Have the Right to Revolt. So? So: Hobbes argument for sovereign rule was not based on divine-right rule (i.e. ʻGod made me King) but on natural law wherein individuals in the wild banded together their sovereignty to cede to the sovereign ruler of the government. So: Hobbesʼ original sovereign is the individual in the state of nature, not God. So: Therefore, others, argued, the people could overthrow a King without overthrowing God, because the King ruled at the consent of the people. Kings were only sovereign because the people made them sovereign. 6
    7. 7. Pop and Locke: John Locke in Second Treatise on Civil Government wrote that people in a state of nature did band together and form governments for the common good. Like Hobbes said, but Locke took Hobbesʼ logic into another direction. Flipped the script on the popular-sovereignty hater. Locke argued that the populace was the original basis for government, and therefore, government power. Government had authority only as long as it provided for the common good of the populace and supported their interests. In order to provide for the common interests of the people, government had to provide more than stability and peace. Any brutal monarch could provide stability by asserting their iron-will through terror and subjugation. Duh! Rulers also had to provide for the rights and freedoms of the people. 7
    8. 8. Pop, Locke, and Drop It. The rights of man were naturally given, and thus, naturally could not be taken away by government. People remained the source of government power even after that government was established. Sovereignty transfered from the people was not given unconditionally. Government was a contract where government ruled by the consent of the governed. If Government was in breach of that contract, the contract was null and void. The Populace, Locke said, could drop it. It, in this case was the government or ruler who now lacked authority to rule. The people, in taking back that authority, now had the authority to get revolutionary. Which is just what the Founding Fathers of Our Great Nation did. 8
    9. 9. Prelude to Revolution For a long time, Britain was like a parent who raised their colony by a policy of benign neglect. The colonists by nature were a freedom-loving bunch wherein a system of political participation and popular sovereignty flourished. Economically, the abundant land and resources America provided allowed them to establish economic independence from Britain. Then, Britain came to the realization that their ʻbabyʼ America was all grown up and tried to reassert their dominion over their willfully independent colony. Britain tried to ground America, by taking away Americaʼs allowance and not allowing them to speak at the table - i.e. taxation without representation. 9
    10. 10. Growing Pains Englandʼs “Because I Said So” approach did not go over too well with the colonists. They were not accustomed to this authoritarian command-style parenting after so many years of permissiveness. Representatives for the colonies including George Washington, John Hancock and John Henry meet in the First Continental Congress where the Declaration of Resolves is passed in 1774. The Declaration of Resolves rejects Britainʼs claim of absolute authority over the colonies, and asserts the rights of the colonists. Britain tried to write and post a lot of rules on the fridge that stated how America was to behave. These rules included: The Proclamation of 1763, The Sugar Act, The Currency Act, The Stamp Act, The Townshend Revenue Acts, The Tea Acts, The Coercive Acts, and The New England Restraining Act. 10
    11. 11. What do we want? Liberty! When do we want it? Now! These new house rules pushed the colonists over the edge. They decided they were big enough to move out of the British Empire. The New England Restraining Act prompted Patrick Henry to make his famous “Give me Liberty or Give Me Death” Speech. This was in 1775, the same year that the “shot heard round the world” was fired. The American Revolution began! The second continental congress convenes in 1775. The congress makes George Washington the General of the Continental Army. The battles rage on. Thomas Paine writes Common Sense, openly calling for Independence from Great Britain. The French decide to give America money to move out of the British Empire in 1776. Under the Continental Congress, the colonies each form their own governments. The Declaration of Independence is drafted and signed. 11
    12. 12. The Declaration of Independence This Declaration of Independence formally stated that America was moving out of the British Empire, and would no longer pay rent, or attend family functions. No compromises or reconciliation: too late for that. This document lays out the case for the necessity of the Revolution. It asserts the colonistsʼ rights and liberty, even if those freedoms must come at the expense of order and stability. 12
    13. 13. Spoiler Alert: We Won! General Cornwallis surrenders, treaties are signed, and the war is over. Now what? What we will cover at length in this class is the ʻnow what?ʼ issues and events! 13
    14. 14. Need More? Please let me know if you need or want to know more about any topic. I will do my best to locate resources and information that are needed! 14
    15. 15. Credits Slide 1: Asleep in Class photo by Hari Bilalic from http://www.flickr.com/photos/haribilalic/2461346638/sizes/ s/ (Used under Creative Commons Attribution License) Slide 4: Thomas Hobbes photo from http://www.politik-thomas-hobbes.de/images/content/hobbes_anim.gif Slide 5: Calvin and Hobbs comic retrieved from http://dlazechk.dl.funpic.org/mergedschoollife5.html Slide 7: John Locke from https://europeanleaders.wikispaces.com/file/view/John_Locke.jpg Slide 8: John Locke in his most luxurious wig from http://oregonstate.edu/instruct/phl302/distance_arc/ images/Locke7.jpg Slide 9: The Horse America Throwing His Master from http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/revolution/image/ memory.jpg Slide 10: The Repeal from http://memory.loc.gov/service/pnp/cph/3b50000/3b52000/3b52000/3b52022r.jpg Slide11: Give Me Liberty or Give me Death from http://www.boldhearts.com/3b50326r%20Patrick %20Henry.jpg Slide 12: Declaration of Independence from http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/journey/images/ declaration_0001.jpg Slide 13: Cornwallis Surrenders to Washington from http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/revolution- images/images/cornwallis-surrender.gif Slide 14: United States Constitution from http://www.archives.gov/historical-docs/doc-content/images/ constitution-m.jpg and Bill of Rights from http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/images/ charters_exhibit_zoom_images/bill_of_rights_630.jpg 15

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