Renaissance Italy<br />By: Amanda Hankin, Matt Owens, Kush Gupta, Cameron McDaniel, Vihan Shah<br />
Religion<br />Christianity had split due to conflicts over the proper method of worship, or the nature of god<br />Followe...
Religion Continued..<br />individual people could interpret the Bible independently<br />advocated Sola fide , or the beli...
v<br />
Government<br />papacy was the government in the Renaissance<br />consisted of a pope, or a supreme head of the Catholic C...
Language<br />Latin and Italian were the two languages during the Italian renaissance<br />has today remained the language...
Schooling<br />Estimates from the late 16th century Venice suggest that 1 boy in 3 and 1 girl in 8 at some point went to s...
Schooling Continued…<br />Latin schools taught skills desiring government classes; Italian schools taught for skills of co...
Literature<br />The texts were very often Christian<br />Material was medieval, easily accessible, colorful, and full of p...
Theater<br />The most common type of theater in Renaissance Italy is called commedia dell'arte<br />That means "theater of...
Music<br />Most music of the Renaissance period was religious, written for the Catholic and Protestant churches<br />One t...
Scientific/Technological Advancements<br />The renaissance was a period of great advancements<br />Use of gunpowder was im...
Astrology/Astronomy<br />Astrology- the study of the sun, moon, planets, and stars  <br />Astrologers thought that Earth w...
Architecture<br />architecture is not regarded as an occupation. Professional architects, painters, sculptors and amateurs...
Works of Leon Battista Alberti<br />
Art<br />In art, Humanism meant 3 things: appearance of the human figure, greater realism and attention to detail (mastery...
Works by Michelangelo and DaVinci<br />
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Renaissance Italy:Kush, Amanda, Cameron, Vihan and Matt Pd:2

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Renaissance Italy:Kush, Amanda, Cameron, Vihan and Matt Pd:2

  1. 1. Renaissance Italy<br />By: Amanda Hankin, Matt Owens, Kush Gupta, Cameron McDaniel, Vihan Shah<br />
  2. 2. Religion<br />Christianity had split due to conflicts over the proper method of worship, or the nature of god<br />Followers started disagreeing with the Catholic Church and its methods/traditions and laws<br />more and more people found much corruption and greed within the churches<br />most famous dissidents were John Wycliffe, Jan Hus, Girolamo Savonarola, and Martin Luther<br />These reformers advocated a church without corruption and without the sale of indulgences, and believed in Sola scriptura , or the fact that priests weren't needed and weren't the superior religious authority<br />
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  4. 4. Religion Continued..<br />individual people could interpret the Bible independently<br />advocated Sola fide , or the belief that one can only reach salvation through faith in god, not by living a completely sinless life<br />Martin Luther was the main man behind Protestantism, and nailed 95 theses or statements outlining all corruption and fault within the Catholic Government on the door of the church<br />
  5. 5. v<br />
  6. 6. Government<br />papacy was the government in the Renaissance<br />consisted of a pope, or a supreme head of the Catholic Church<br />it included the papal government, or the "curia" which was ruled by cardinals, or the churchmen second only to the pope himself<br />cardinals lived luxuriously with many servants, and they used the "Canon Law" to punish heretics<br />The court "Inquisition" was created in 1231 for this sole purpose<br />
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  8. 8. Language<br />Latin and Italian were the two languages during the Italian renaissance<br />has today remained the languages of learned treatises, much legislation, and legal record keeping<br />The two languages had similar grammar and a vastly common vocabulary<br />Nobles and merchants, if well schooled, might use Latin; men of the pen did so a lot, but it is very common for women, peasants, and artisans barely use the language<br />Latin was more standardized than Italian, with dozens of dialects and countless vocal variations<br />
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  10. 10. Schooling<br />Estimates from the late 16th century Venice suggest that 1 boy in 3 and 1 girl in 8 at some point went to school<br />Those rates would be similar in other cities, but lower in smaller areas<br />Schools had one teacher and students were either taught alone, or they were taught in groups<br />Wealthier families got tutors for their children (private teachers)<br />In the 1550’s the new religious orders set up bigger schools more like the ones we know, where teachers taught different grades<br />Renaissance in Italy had 2 languages, and therefore had Latin schools and Italian schools<br />
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  12. 12. Schooling Continued…<br />Latin schools taught skills desiring government classes; Italian schools taught for skills of commerce, some people however went to both schools<br />Teachers drilled their students in the variety of sentence forms and made them write imaginary letters, this instruction taught imitation, not originality and discovery; it aimed to produce able readers, good speakers, fluent writers who adapted tone to task at hand<br />All students therefore kept a notebook which they culled model sentences from the accepted works, in hopes of imitation<br />Besides reading and writing, the schools also taught a type of mathematics called, abbaco<br />Abbaco was the mathematic of commerce; it dealt with weights and measures, currency exchange, interest on investments, the estimation of volumes, and the calculation of costs<br />
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  14. 14. Literature<br />The texts were very often Christian<br />Material was medieval, easily accessible, colorful, and full of practical morality<br />romances, tales of knights, damsels, giants, and battles, were among the texts most popular during the renaissance<br />All new of crops, prices, currency fluctuations, and politics was germane to trade<br />Avvisi writers scrounged for rumors, both foreign and domestic<br />These rumors they penned once a week and sent with regular couriers as letters to the prince who paid their keep<br />These bulletins were not secret; they were copied and distributed widely<br />
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  16. 16. Theater<br />The most common type of theater in Renaissance Italy is called commedia dell'arte<br />That means "theater of professionals."  It is improvised plays that are made up of a few characters<br />Each actor has their own specialty, some are merchants, others servants, and others lovers<br />Theaters of the day were mostly in the shape of a horseshoe, with the stage at the center<br />The horseshoe was based on Roman theatrical design<br />During the Renaissance, architects started designing more complex and complicated sets<br />The same is true for costumes and props during the Renaissance<br />
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  18. 18. Music<br />Most music of the Renaissance period was religious, written for the Catholic and Protestant churches<br />One type of music that was commonly religious was the motet<br />motet consists of Latin text set to music<br />An example of non-religious music was the madrigal<br />During the Renaissance, it was the most popular form of non-religious music<br />It was music written for several voices<br />Vocal parts were poetic, with the tone of the music changing to fit the tone of poetry<br />Instrumental music also became popular during the Renaissance<br />Because vocal music was so popular, it was sometime adapted for instruments<br />This was called intabulation<br />
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  20. 20. Scientific/Technological Advancements<br />The renaissance was a period of great advancements<br />Use of gunpowder was improved<br />Started using it for cannons and hand-held gun carriages<br />Improvements to travel and transportation<br />Canal improvements (locks and coaches)<br />Sea chart improvements and new instruments (magnetic compass and quadrant) <br />Began using water mills as mechanical energy<br />Advancements made many improvements to farming<br />
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  22. 22. Astrology/Astronomy<br />Astrology- the study of the sun, moon, planets, and stars  <br />Astrologers thought that Earth was the center of the universe. Astrologers were consulted by many because they believed that the alignment of the stars and different signs in the sky meant things on Earth, consulted on when the best time to go to war was<br />consulted on when the best time to harvest crops was<br />Astronomers came in later and began disproving theories that astrologers hadExample: Nicolaus Copernicus disproved the theory that the solar system revolved around the Earth by proving that the solar system revolved around the Sun.<br />
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  24. 24. Architecture<br />architecture is not regarded as an occupation. Professional architects, painters, sculptors and amateurs’ created architectural designs since they have a lot of time and money.<br />Since there are ruins of many ancient Roman buildings remained throughout Italy, merchants of Florence realized that a good way to emphasize their wealth and authority would be to commission buildings in the ancient Roman way, so they began to study the ruins and recorded them in drawings and copied many of their features in their own buildings.<br />Architects hope to create structures that would connect to both emotion and reason.<br />Theorists on architecture believed that architectural design came out of human experience.<br />Leon Battista Alberti is best known for his books on architecture and the theories that are in them. <br />
  25. 25. Works of Leon Battista Alberti<br />
  26. 26. Art<br />In art, Humanism meant 3 things: appearance of the human figure, greater realism and attention to detail (mastery of linear perspective), and an emphasis on virtuous action.<br />Much of the basis of art today was laid by masters of art (ex. Michelangelo, DaVinci).<br />In the Early Renaissance, among with other achievements, artists believed that the path to greatness and enlightenment was through the study of the Golden ages of ancient Greeks and Romans.<br />Inspired by Humanism, they looked into the achievements of the Greco-Roman antiquity.<br />The goal of the Renaissance artists was to achieve beauty and aimed to express it through the portrayal of humans, expressing personality and behavior and Interest in the Greek and Roman culture led to a boost in knowledge about the human figure. <br />
  27. 27. Works by Michelangelo and DaVinci<br />

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