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LANDSCAPE APPROACHES 
Defining a role and value proposition for the Rainforest Alliance 
1 
Jeff Hayward 
Rainforest Allia...
WHY A KEY PART OF OUR STRATEGIES FOR 
LIVELIHOODS OR BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION? 
3 
• Limitations of certification and pro...
MODALITIES OF LANDSCAPE APPROACHES (RA) 
4 
# Modality 
1 “Adding on, expanding out” – reach beyond current core site base...
FCCA-GHANA: JUABESO – BIA LANDSCAPE 
Bia 
National 
Park 
Krokosua Hills 
Forest Reserve 
“Globally Significant 
Biodivers...
7
BENCHMARK CARBON STOCKS: 
STRATIFICATION 
Higher shade 
cocoa 
8 
Low/no shade cocoa 
Open canopy forest 
Agriculture/fall...
RESULTS TO DATE .. 
• Over 2,000 farmers trained to date according to the SAN sustainability 
standards and the additional...
CHALLENGES AND WAYS FORWARD 
• Improving Governance, Administration – Strengthen existing governance 
structures (communit...
The Rainforest Alliance works to conserve biodiversity and ensure sustainable livelihoods 
by transforming land-use practi...
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Landscape approache: Defining a role and value proposition for the Rainforest. By Jeff Hayward rainforest alliance-2014-12-5

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How we can pursue landscape approaches strategically and systematically, where they make sense, for achieving greater mitigation outcomes, as well as related socio-economic and ecological co-benefits.

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Landscape approache: Defining a role and value proposition for the Rainforest. By Jeff Hayward rainforest alliance-2014-12-5

  1. 1. LANDSCAPE APPROACHES Defining a role and value proposition for the Rainforest Alliance 1 Jeff Hayward Rainforest Alliance 5 Dec 2014, Lima COP20
  2. 2. WHY A KEY PART OF OUR STRATEGIES FOR LIVELIHOODS OR BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION? 3 • Limitations of certification and production unit approaches to address certain biodiversity & livelihood threats • Achieve and document impacts beyond production unit boundaries • Magnify our impacts by integrating across sectors and with new partners • Better address co-related and dependent issues such as REDD+, zero deforestation, and climate adaptation • We may not be able to achieve the needed mitigation from AFOLU if we don’t find a way to work effectively at landscape scale
  3. 3. MODALITIES OF LANDSCAPE APPROACHES (RA) 4 # Modality 1 “Adding on, expanding out” – reach beyond current core site based activities, including more issues, communities, partners. 2 “Destinations and landscapes” – combine agriculture, forestry, and tourism work in synergistic ways. 3 “Landscape management as CSR” – work with companies to reduce risks and help guide investments where they can have maximum benefit. 4 “Landscape sustainability metrics” – companies want to show impact at larger scale, and more efficiently 5 “New models for certification” – develop methods & systems to certify landscapes, not farms 6 “Business engagement in multi-stakeholder landscape initiatives” – Greater multi-functionality through land use planning, institutional and policy alignment, PPPs.
  4. 4. FCCA-GHANA: JUABESO – BIA LANDSCAPE Bia National Park Krokosua Hills Forest Reserve “Globally Significant Biodiversity Area Timber Concessions
  5. 5. 7
  6. 6. BENCHMARK CARBON STOCKS: STRATIFICATION Higher shade cocoa 8 Low/no shade cocoa Open canopy forest Agriculture/fallows
  7. 7. RESULTS TO DATE .. • Over 2,000 farmers trained to date according to the SAN sustainability standards and the additional climate criteria • Reach of the project to date covers more than 3,700 ha in 36 communities • Close to 100,000 shade tree seedlings have been planted • Yield increase of 15-30% resulting in an average income increase of 25% • Internal management systems developed • 15 teachers trained and now running environment clubs in 12 junior high schools • Climate risks and impacts assessed at community and farm level and activities to counter these are being put in place • Sustainable trading relationship developed • Project objectives align well with World Bank investments in Ghana: FIP, FCPF, ISFL
  8. 8. CHALLENGES AND WAYS FORWARD • Improving Governance, Administration – Strengthen existing governance structures (community/cluster/landscape) to better support current and future technical assistance and field implementation. • Finding best entry point for capacity building - Use scalable training platforms (lead farmers) and community organizational strengthening (producer associations) • Markets vs livelihoods/food security - Market-driven approach adds private sector resources to donor-funding, should be diversified, bundled. Holistic approach to identify alternative economic incentives to add value to community incomes. • Funding extension, technical assistance, over long term – private sector risk, favorable capital conditions, micro-credit, government program targeting • Payments for mitigation, landscape Carbon Accounting – methods to estimate carbon across smallholdings without numerous field measurements, reducing cost and replicable elsewhere. 10
  9. 9. The Rainforest Alliance works to conserve biodiversity and ensure sustainable livelihoods by transforming land-use practices, business practices and consumer behavior. www.rainforest-alliance.org www.sanstandards.org 11

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