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Landcare in Southern
Africa
Clinton Muller
Joseph Tanui
Emily Mutota
Spencer Ng’oma
Some ambitious targets?
• UNCCD – Land Degradation Neutrality
• Bonn Challenge – restoration 150 million ha
• Improve smal...
What is Landcare?
Voluntary community groups of farmers and other
interested people collectively working together on mutua...
Defining Landcare… ???
• As a MOVEMENT ... Landcare is a movement of local people that share knowledge
about sustainable a...
6 Principles of Landcare
(adapted from South Africa)
1. Integrated Sustainable Natural Resource Management
addressing prim...
Technical solutions AND/OR Social infrastructure?
Our speakers…
• Joseph Tanui – Kenya
- World Agroforestry Centre
• Emily Mutota – Namibia
- Ministry of Tourism & Environm...
Why strengthen rural
institutions?
Landcare lessons from East Africa
Joseph Tanui
Challenging the status quo
• Rapid change of smallholder farming systems in sub-
Saharan
• Characterized by land degradati...
A number of reasons for poor investments in sustainable
solutions by smallholders in the region:
• Weak institutional supp...
Why strengthen rural grassroots institutions?
• For the community important - collective action –
access - leveraging
• Pr...
Social Capital and Landcare
• Social Capital - the norms and networks that enable
collective action
• Encompasses institut...
Landcare Brand recognition,
Shared networks, influence &
Learning
Networks & Policy
influence
Social Capital &
Institution...
Social Capital Relevance to Knowledge Platforms?
• Identify problems early, and attempt to solve them
• Develop and test n...
Lessons from the Field….
Kapchorwa District Landcare Chapter
(KADLACC)
Key Challenges:
• Vegetation removal
• Declining Soil Fertility
• Erosion and Landslips
• Conflict in Forest areas
• Gende...
Outcomes:
• Reduction of livestock grazing
• Increased milk production
• Increased Agroforestry tree
cover
• Reduction in ...
The REAL Outcomes:
• Community cohesion and unity –
evidenced by the networking, knowledge
sharing, relationships & trust
...
Key Lessons
• Community needs to be at the forefront of sustainable
land management – grassroots / bottom up driven
• The ...
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Landcare in Southern Africa

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Landcare is an approach based on the notion of caring for your land as a community. The model is based on the values of community empowerment and collective action to develop and apply innovative solutions to natural resource management (NRM) challenges, networking farmers with the broader community and promoting sustainable land management practices

Published in: Environment
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Landcare in Southern Africa

  1. 1. Landcare in Southern Africa Clinton Muller Joseph Tanui Emily Mutota Spencer Ng’oma
  2. 2. Some ambitious targets? • UNCCD – Land Degradation Neutrality • Bonn Challenge – restoration 150 million ha • Improve smallholder livelihoods & food security Who?
  3. 3. What is Landcare? Voluntary community groups of farmers and other interested people collectively working together on mutual issues at a local scale
  4. 4. Defining Landcare… ??? • As a MOVEMENT ... Landcare is a movement of local people that share knowledge about sustainable and profitable agriculture while conserving the environment and natural resources. • As an APPROACH ... Landcare is an extension approach/method that rapidly and inexpensively disseminates sustainable farming practices among thousands of farmers based on the farmers’ innate interest in learning and sharing knowledge about new technologies that earn more money and conserve natural resources. This embodies three basic cornerstones: appropriate technologies, partnership building and institution building. • As a BODY OF KNOWLEDGE ... Landcare is a set of appropriate land management practices to care for the land in a sustainable, economic and productive way. • As an ETHIC, a PHILOSOPHY ... Landcare is an ethic, a philosophy that enables individuals and communities to approach agriculture in a mature and nurturing way to improve livelihoods.
  5. 5. 6 Principles of Landcare (adapted from South Africa) 1. Integrated Sustainable Natural Resource Management addressing primary causes of natural resource decline 2. Community based and led natural resource management within a participatory framework 3. The development of sustainable livelihoods for individuals, groups and communities utilising empowerment strategies 4. Government, community and individual capacity building through targeted training, education, and support mechanisms 5. The development of active and true partnerships between governments, LandCare groups and communities, non- government organisations, and industry. 6. The blending together of appropriate upper level policy processes with bottom up feedback mechanisms
  6. 6. Technical solutions AND/OR Social infrastructure?
  7. 7. Our speakers… • Joseph Tanui – Kenya - World Agroforestry Centre • Emily Mutota – Namibia - Ministry of Tourism & Environment / Dept. Environmental Affairs • Spencer Ng’oma – Malawi - Total Land Care Keep the Discussion Live! @AfricaLandcare
  8. 8. Why strengthen rural institutions? Landcare lessons from East Africa Joseph Tanui
  9. 9. Challenging the status quo • Rapid change of smallholder farming systems in sub- Saharan • Characterized by land degradation, population pressure, intensive farming, continuous cropping in small plots • Need for sustainable solutions – beyond traditional agricultural expansion • Degradation manifests negative direct and indirect effects on livelihoods
  10. 10. A number of reasons for poor investments in sustainable solutions by smallholders in the region: • Weak institutional support • Gaps in technology adoption and extension service models • Weak and inappropriate governance and regulatory processes and low market integration The institutional and policy context is seen as an external factor that influences adoption by smallholder farmers
  11. 11. Why strengthen rural grassroots institutions? • For the community important - collective action – access - leveraging • Projects / government advisory services - accessible groups for dissemination and innovation • Sustainability of development interventions an issue – collective action alone not enough • Strengthening rural institutions can add sustainability / resilience
  12. 12. Social Capital and Landcare • Social Capital - the norms and networks that enable collective action • Encompasses institutions, relationships and customs that shape the quality and quantity of social interactions • Evidence demonstrates it is critical for societies to prosper economically and for development to be sustainable • Builds community capacity to work together to address common needs, fosters inclusiveness & cohesion, increases transparency and accountability (World Bank, 2011)
  13. 13. Landcare Brand recognition, Shared networks, influence & Learning Networks & Policy influence Social Capital & Institutional Building Participatory Technologies eg: EverGreen / CA Household livelihood strategies Natural resource base Participatory Technologies eg: FMNR / Conservation Ag Household livelihood strategies Natural resource base (Prior, 2012)
  14. 14. Social Capital Relevance to Knowledge Platforms? • Identify problems early, and attempt to solve them • Develop and test new technologies and innovate • Pass new technologies and innovations between their members; act as extension agents • Actively seek out new information from extension officers or researchers • Adapt & evolve in order to remain effective and survive • Understand and satisfy the priority needs of members • Undertake sustainable agricultural development & SLM
  15. 15. Lessons from the Field…. Kapchorwa District Landcare Chapter (KADLACC)
  16. 16. Key Challenges: • Vegetation removal • Declining Soil Fertility • Erosion and Landslips • Conflict in Forest areas • Gender inequality • Poor Governance
  17. 17. Outcomes: • Reduction of livestock grazing • Increased milk production • Increased Agroforestry tree cover • Reduction in Landside frequency • Food production increases (Nyangas & Chemangei, 2010)
  18. 18. The REAL Outcomes: • Community cohesion and unity – evidenced by the networking, knowledge sharing, relationships & trust • Gender balancing – workloads and decision making • Youth engagement • Local by laws
  19. 19. Key Lessons • Community needs to be at the forefront of sustainable land management – grassroots / bottom up driven • The modality of Landcare will evolve in each country – but is most effective when adhering to the principles • Partnerships are critical to the success of Landcare – Government, NGO, Private AND Community • Exposure to the Landcare approach is necessary to take it to scale • Knowledge sharing / brokering is key

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