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Foundations for Resilient Livelihoods:      Soils, Savings and Trees                        Douglas R. Brown             D...
Some thoughts on hunger and food “but hunger is not a natural disaster. It is a legacy of  choices made in the past. It s...
Some thoughts on hunger and food “Food is indispensible for humanity. If there is  enough to eat and the food supply is s...
Some thoughts on worldview and foodproduction Religion, cultural values and norms    “those worldview beliefs that deter...
The heart of the matter Agriculture has two essential parts:   Working the land   Taking care of the land      Source:...
Investing in the AssetBase for ResilientLivelihoods Natural Capital    Soil, water, land Human Capital    Knowledge an...
But something is missing too HORN OF AFRICA: Greater food insecurity forecast    Source: IRIN, 5 April 2012,     http://...
Source: DFID. 2011. Defining Disaster Resilience: A DFID Approach Paper.
Ecosystem resilience and food security                         (Conway and Toenniessen, 2003)
Ecosystem resilience and food security Increase dryland agricultural productivity (profitability), sustainability  and re...
State:                                         State:                                CWBO1:                               ...
Foundations for Resilient Livelihoods Soils, Savings, Trees (SST)    Soils        Protect, restore soils through good S...
Development is … People    Wanting things to be better – hopes and aspirations    May feel trapped – need the space and...
Source:Sahel Working Group. 2011. Escapingthe Hunger Cycle - Pathways-to-Resilience-in-the-Sahel.http://www.groundswellint...
Dr Douglas Brown:   foundations for resilient livelihoods #BeatingFamine
Dr Douglas Brown:   foundations for resilient livelihoods #BeatingFamine
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Dr Douglas Brown: foundations for resilient livelihoods #BeatingFamine

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Linkages between healthy landscapes and food security

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Dr Douglas Brown: foundations for resilient livelihoods #BeatingFamine

  1. 1. Foundations for Resilient Livelihoods: Soils, Savings and Trees Douglas R. Brown Director, Agriculture and Food Security 11 April 2012 Presentation at the international conference: Beating famine: Sustainable food security through land regeneration in a changing climate , Nairobi, Kenya
  2. 2. Some thoughts on hunger and food “but hunger is not a natural disaster. It is a legacy of choices made in the past. It stems from a series of decisions that, in retrospect, appear short-sighted, and were based on a wrong diagnosis of the causes of hunger, leading to incorrect prescriptions to remedy it. The single most important proximate cause of hunger today is that … countries have either not invested sufficiently in agriculture or have invested in the wrong kind of agriculture, with little impact on the reduction in rural poverty.”  Source: de Schutter and Cordes. 2011. Accounting for Hunger. Page 2.
  3. 3. Some thoughts on hunger and food “Food is indispensible for humanity. If there is enough to eat and the food supply is sure, then we’ll develop. But if we haven’t enough to eat, then we cannot develop. We must sort out the food problem before we do anything else.”  Source: Yacouba Sawadogo in “The Man who Stopped the Desert”, http://www.1080films.co.uk/Yacoubamovie/
  4. 4. Some thoughts on worldview and foodproduction Religion, cultural values and norms  “those worldview beliefs that determine cultural values and individual motivation and behaviour ”  Source: Gary W. Fick. 2008. Food, Farming and Faith A study of the linkage between Judeo-Christian foundations or principles found in the Bible and agricultural sustainability.
  5. 5. The heart of the matter Agriculture has two essential parts:  Working the land  Taking care of the land  Source: Genesis 2:15 What do we most often emphasize? What do we neglect?
  6. 6. Investing in the AssetBase for ResilientLivelihoods Natural Capital  Soil, water, land Human Capital  Knowledge and skills Social Capital  Institutions  Cultural values and norms Physical Capital Financial Capital  Finances  Market institutions
  7. 7. But something is missing too HORN OF AFRICA: Greater food insecurity forecast  Source: IRIN, 5 April 2012, http://www.irinnews.org/Report/95247/HORN-OF-AFRICA-Greater-food Support to resilience is said to be essential – but what is that? Is it?:  Long term investment in education, water and early warning  Provision of drought-resistant seeds, water, education, weather forecasting and scaling up nutrition The question we have been asking:  What will build or restore resilience?
  8. 8. Source: DFID. 2011. Defining Disaster Resilience: A DFID Approach Paper.
  9. 9. Ecosystem resilience and food security (Conway and Toenniessen, 2003)
  10. 10. Ecosystem resilience and food security Increase dryland agricultural productivity (profitability), sustainability and resilience through  Capturing higher percentage of rainfall  Mulch vs bare soil  Contour bunds  Ridge tillage  Other S&WC practices  Increasing soil organic matter content  Improves soil’s capacity to absorb rainfall and retain soil moisture  Increases capacity of soil to retain plant nutrients  Improves fertilizer use efficiency  Incorporate trees into the agropastoral landscape Increase resiliency to climatic and market shocks through more diversified production systems
  11. 11. State: State: CWBO1: CWBO2: Resilient Food Parents Nourishe Livelihoo Securit Provide d d y Agricultural Production Household Land Knowledge Resources Food & Skills Consumption (quantity, quality, intrahoushol Income Cultural d allocation, Values, etc.) Labour Norms & Resources Priorities Other Uses of Income Non-Agr. (+ve, -ve) Use of Labour SavingsUnderstanding the system in order to effect change
  12. 12. Foundations for Resilient Livelihoods Soils, Savings, Trees (SST)  Soils  Protect, restore soils through good S&WC practices  Savings  Savings groups for all households  Tress  Regeneration of woody vegetation in the landscape These are the foundations for resilience  Accessible to all  Even the poorest and most vulnerable  Other things are good, but these are foundational
  13. 13. Development is … People  Wanting things to be better – hopes and aspirations  May feel trapped – need the space and the possibility to change Change  People need to be free to change  People need to want to change  People need to be able to change Helping people to bring about change through  Local participation  Local perceptions  Local knowledge  Local empowerment  Local institutions, cultural values and norms
  14. 14. Source:Sahel Working Group. 2011. Escapingthe Hunger Cycle - Pathways-to-Resilience-in-the-Sahel.http://www.groundswellinternational.org/susthttp://www.odi.org.uk/events/details.asp?id=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mTIVdNK

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