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  • Note takers use the back channel, post links
  • K12 Education Point of View is research and background. Trends of what Dell is seeing in the marketplace.An Educational Blueprint helps us identify all the stakeholders within the teaching and learning environment, and is something we call the Learning Ecosystem. Connected Classroom Overview
  • 21st Century Skills slideP21 statesSkills for college and careers“Self-Direction” has been added in the last yearGreen is about core contentFramework is used by 15 statesCatalyst for the conversationProf development has fallen short because it’s at state level
  • No correct answer
  • What is TPACK?Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) attempts to capture some of the essential qualities of knowledge required by teachers for technology integration in their teaching, while addressing the complex, multifaceted and situated nature of teacher knowledge. At the heart of the TPACK framework, is the complex interplay of three primary forms of knowledge: Content (CK), Pedagogy (PK), and Technology (TK).
  • Auto industry example – laying off people but don’t have enough people to fill the future positions
  • These are some of the basic and minimum skills Dell reviews for hiring employees
  • You can link the mashup to the “Shining” video on trailer mashup.
  • Our children are growing up in the digital age. They truly communicate and learn differently than past generations.The stats from Speak Up are striking:Students in Grades 3-5: regular use of technology outside of school  54% of both girls and boys play video or online games regularly 32% share music, videos and photos38% participate in virtual worlds (such as Webkinz, Club Penguin) 28% send emails, text messages or instant messages38% have a cell phone – 14% have smartphones Students in Grades 3-5: regular use of technology for schoolwork  34% take tests online7% have taken an online class52% play educational games24% check on their own grades51% use the Internet for research 33% practice writing   Students in Grades 6-12: regular use of technology outside of school  38% upload/download videos, podcasts and photos 23% create new work – mashup47% communicate via email/IM/Texting – additional 27% communicate through their social networking site40% update their social networking site20% use web tools to write collaboratively with others71% have a cell phone – 26% have a smartphone Students in Grades 6-12: regular use of technology for schoolwork 62% access grades and class information59% create slides shows, videos and web pages for assignments 32% take tests online15% use an online plagiarism checker 38% use their social networking site to collaborate with classmates on school projects 29% use online textbooks    Attribution: © Project TomorrowSpeak Up 2008 National Data Findings Speak Up is an annual research project of Project Tomorrow, a national education nonprofit organization (www.tomorrow.org) All rights reserved.    Yet, many of our schools are designed for the industrial age.-------------------Note: Re online games – includes portable and/or console players
  • http://www.links999.net/utopia/education.htmlDon Knezek, chief executive officer of the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), says the “digital divide,” the gap between people with and without effective access to digital technology and its impact on their earnings, now also is seen as a “learning divide.” That means, he says, that “kids don’t have the opportunity to learn, as well as earn,” if they don’t have digital skills. While students formerly had the classroom teacher as their “sole guide,” they now can use those skills, as well as new digital tools, to connect and interact with experts around the world, and “that makes so much difference in helping kids learn and advance and stay engaged,” Knezek says.
  • The impact is that the “Connected Generation” typically has to disconnect when they enter the classroom. This concept of disconnecting is a concern for many teachers, who want to meet children where they are – and they are digital learners.
  • If you printed the internet it would take 57,000 years to read it and that is reading 24/7.Source: http://www.cartridgesave.co.uk/news/if-you-printed-the-internet/
  • If you printed the internet it would take 57,000 years to read it and that is reading 24/7.Source: http://www.cartridgesave.co.uk/news/if-you-printed-the-internet/
  • With a single ink jet printer it would take 3,805 years to print the internet.Source: http://www.cartridgesave.co.uk/news/if-you-printed-the-internet/
  • By Number 17, NYC and Nayeli E. RodriguezSources: Blogpulse, Google Official History, Reality Blurred, The NPD Group, NBC, Bowker, USPS, The Radicati Group, Forbes, World Clown Association, Nielsen, Newspaper Association of America, Digital Music News, Apple, Itunes (launched in 2001)Image credits, top to bottom, left to right: courtesy of Nintendo, Boris Roessler—DPA-Corbis, Corbis, courtesy of Nintendo, Miranda Penn Turin—courtesy of USA Network (2), Chairman Ting Creative—Getty Images, no credit, Martin Lee—Alamy, Nation Wong—Getty Images, Laurent Davoust-Age Fotostock, Fox, Don Farrall—Getty Images, Winston Davidian—Getty Images, no credit (5), no credit, Michael Ochs Archives—Getty Images
  • By Number 17, NYC and Nayeli E. RodriguezSources: Blogpulse, Google Official History, Reality Blurred, The NPD Group, NBC, Bowker, USPS, The Radicati Group, Forbes, World Clown Association, Nielsen, Newspaper Association of America, Digital Music News, Apple, Itunes (launched in 2001)Image credits, top to bottom, left to right: courtesy of Nintendo, Boris Roessler—DPA-Corbis, Corbis, courtesy of Nintendo, Miranda Penn Turin—courtesy of USA Network (2), Chairman Ting Creative—Getty Images, no credit, Martin Lee—Alamy, Nation Wong—Getty Images, Laurent Davoust-Age Fotostock, Fox, Don Farrall—Getty Images, Winston Davidian—Getty Images, no credit (5), no credit, Michael Ochs Archives—Getty Images
  • By Number 17, NYC and Nayeli E. RodriguezSources: Blogpulse, Google Official History, Reality Blurred, The NPD Group, NBC, Bowker, USPS, The Radicati Group, Forbes, World Clown Association, Nielsen, Newspaper Association of America, Digital Music News, Apple, Itunes (launched in 2001)Image credits, top to bottom, left to right: courtesy of Nintendo, Boris Roessler—DPA-Corbis, Corbis, courtesy of Nintendo, Miranda Penn Turin—courtesy of USA Network (2), Chairman Ting Creative—Getty Images, no credit, Martin Lee—Alamy, Nation Wong—Getty Images, Laurent Davoust-Age Fotostock, Fox, Don Farrall—Getty Images, Winston Davidian—Getty Images, no credit (5), no credit, Michael Ochs Archives—Getty Images
  • Online survey conducted blind and deployed by MMS Education to 82,900 randomly selected educators, emails provided by MCH:46,600 teachers25,600 principals10,700 library/media specialists•1.55% response rate or 1,284 total responses:601 Teachers (47% of responders) -1.29% response381 Principals (30% of responders) -1.49% response262 Librarians (20% of responders) -2.45 % responseDemographicsGenderFemale75%Male25%Age18-3414%35-5457%55+30%Years in education2-10 yrs23%11-20 yrs36%21+ yrs42%Grade levelElementary46%Middle School30%High School34%District metro-statusRural14%Suburban52%Urban25%Unknown9%States48 states + D
  • The impact is that the “Connected Generation” typically has to disconnect when they enter the classroom. This concept of disconnecting is a concern for many teachers, who want to meet children where they are – and they are digital learners.
  • The impact is that the “Connected Generation” typically has to disconnect when they enter the classroom. This concept of disconnecting is a concern for many teachers, who want to meet children where they are – and they are digital learners.
  • Wouldn’t it be great to use the tech to go deeper?WolframAlpha(x-2)(x+3)FOILCould we start with the answer and where does if fit into the real world?Bing will have it built in, Office 2010 will have it built in 3DIs this cheating?
  • This is an opportunity to explore new learning without making any commitment to implementation or change in practice and/or with no expectation of impacting student learning.
  • This type is typically required to carry out management or process tasks. There is a level of expectation that the new learning will change practice in someway, but with no direct link to or measurement of student learning. 
  • There is an expectation that the new learning will be implemented (with appropriate support) in the classroom to change teacher practice. There is also an expectation that this change in practice impact student learning.
  • NSDC-National Staff Development Council
  • Professional Growth Cycle-In order to both change practice and impact student learning, the following cycle should be implemented:Assess: Review of data to identify the need for improved student learning.Learn: Engage in new learning to meet the need.Implement: Receive support for implementing new learning.Reflect: Continually collect data and monitor outcomes of implementation of the new learning to determine if it is meeting the goal.Assess: Revisit the data to identify further need for improved student learning. 
  • http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2010/11/10/11pd_overview.h30.html?tkn=LMPFsi7VIoV535kJzegnCBndz7r4AEl3Wvj9&intc=es
  • http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2010/11/10/11pd_overview.h30.html?tkn=LMPFsi7VIoV535kJzegnCBndz7r4AEl3Wvj9&intc=es
  • http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2010/11/10/11pd_overview.h30.html?tkn=LMPFsi7VIoV535kJzegnCBndz7r4AEl3Wvj9&intc=es
  • Macul2

    1. 1. Information is Changing LearningA Vision for the Future<br />MEETING THE NEEDS OF 21ST CENTURY LEARNERS<br />Adam Garry– <br />Manager of Global Professional Learning<br />
    2. 2. Experience<br />
    3. 3.
    4. 4. Back Channel:http://www.todaysmeet.com/newberlin<br />Note takers<br />Post links<br />Action items<br />
    5. 5. Driving Question<br />How are you defining 21st century learning?<br />5<br />
    6. 6. 21st Century Inquiry<br />Team 1- Create a 10-15 minute presentation to persuade why it is important to infuse 21st century skills into the curriculum<br />Team 2- Create a 10-15 minute presentation to persuade why 21st century skills should not be integrated into the curriculum. <br />*Be ready to debate<br />6<br />
    7. 7. 7<br />
    8. 8. 8<br />It is important to use technology in school because….<br />For engagement<br />To enhance the curriculum<br />It is used in the real world<br />For collaboration<br />10 of 30<br />
    9. 9. The Partnership for 21st Century Skills (www.P21.org)<br />Information/Media Literacy<br />Communication and Collaboration<br />Critical Thinking & Problem Solving<br />Creativity and Innovation<br />Self-Direction (added 2009)<br />Outcomes<br />Support<br />
    10. 10. The most important 21st Century Skill is…<br />10<br />Information/Media Literacy<br />Communication and Collaboration<br />Critical Thinking & Problem Solving<br />Creativity and Innovation<br />Self-Direction<br />17 of 30<br />
    11. 11. 11<br />Source: www.tpack.org<br />http://punya.educ.msu.edu/publications/journal_articles/mishra-koehler-tcr2006.pdf<br />
    12. 12. Geography of US Jobs<br />12<br />Source: http://tipstrategies.com/archive/geography-of-jobs/<br />
    13. 13. Jobs of the Future<br />Employers value workers who can think critically and solve problems. <br />Occupations that employ large shares of workers with post-secondary education and training are growing faster than others. <br />Post-high school education and training system provides valuable skills to those who complete programs in high-growth fields.<br />PREPARING THE WORKERS OF TODAY FOR THE JOBS OF TOMORROW July 2009<br />
    14. 14. Dell Competency Skills-Minimum Requirements<br />Developing Direct Reports<br />Learning on the Fly<br />Organizational Agility<br />Problem Solving <br />Priority Setting<br />Drive for Results <br />Customer Focus<br />Intellectual Horsepower<br />Integrity and Trust<br />Business Acumen<br />Functional/Technical Skills<br />Command Skills<br />Dealing with Ambiguity<br />Building Effective Teams<br />
    15. 15. INFORMATION IS CHANGING<br />LEARNING.<br />
    16. 16. 16<br />Confidential<br />Using Storybird or Xtranormal , I want you to create a book that illustrates the role that information is playing in learning. Be sure to provide some examples of how information has changed over the last five years.<br />
    17. 17. 17<br />Auto-tune <br />MASH-UP<br />CREATE<br />REMIX<br />Information Flows<br />17<br />
    18. 18. OUR CHILDREN<br />ARE GROWING UP <br />IN THE DIGITAL AGE<br />2009<br />Grades 3-5<br /><ul><li>28% Email, IM and Text
    19. 19. 54% Play Video or Online Games
    20. 20. 32% Share Music, Videos, and Photos
    21. 21. 51% Use the Internet for Research</li></ul>Grades 6-8<br /><ul><li>65% Email, IM and Text
    22. 22. 23% Have a Smart Phone w/Internet
    23. 23. 32% Use Social Networking Site to Collaborate on School Projects</li></ul>Grades 9-12<br /><ul><li>72% Email, IM and Text
    24. 24. 31% Have a Smart Phone w/Internet
    25. 25. 43% Use Social Networking Site to Collaborate on School Projects</li></ul>18<br />
    26. 26.
    27. 27. The “Connected Generation” typically disconnects when <br />they enter the classroom.<br />20<br />
    28. 28. Can we argue?<br />2<br />Info- greater amounts & greater speed<br />Info-less vetting & less barriers<br />Things<br />
    29. 29. 32 Million<br />650 Miles<br />http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/b4/Library_of_Congress_from_North.JPG<br />Library of Congress<br />
    30. 30. 32 Million<br />650 Miles<br />=<br />Think of the Library of Congress as a cup…How many times can it be filled up with just the new info created in 2002?A. 108B. 11,060C. 37,000D. 234,908<br />
    31. 31. 37,000<br />Times<br />5 Exabytes of new information is our best estimate of new data created way back in 2002<br />24,050,000 miles of shelves or 1,184,000,000,000 books<br />
    32. 32. 1<br />How much information are we unintentionally publishing?<br />
    33. 33. .01%<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/mbg_photos/2484112082/<br />How much of this new information is in paper format? <br />
    34. 34. 92% of new data<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/mbeattie/116430322/<br />
    35. 35. http://www.flickr.com/photos/jesse757/3094868007/<br />How many years to read the Internet?<br />3<br />12<br />23<br />57,000 <br />
    36. 36. 57,000<br />years<br />
    37. 37. 3,805<br />YEARS<br />
    38. 38. A Day<br />2.7 Billion<br />searches<br /><ul><li>YouTube
    39. 39. Watch - 2billion video clips
    40. 40. Upload- 65,000
    41. 41. Upload 35 hours of content every minute</li></ul>More Internet Statistics<br />
    42. 42. http://www.newsweek.com/feature/2010/by-the-numbers-how-the-digital-revolution-changed-our-world.html<br />
    43. 43. http://www.newsweek.com/feature/2010/by-the-numbers-how-the-digital-revolution-changed-our-world.html<br />
    44. 44. http://www.newsweek.com/feature/2010/by-the-numbers-how-the-digital-revolution-changed-our-world.html<br />
    45. 45. DELL CONFIDENTIAL<br />35<br />500 million active users<br />People spend over 700 billion minutes per month<br />Average user has 130 friends<br />Average user spend 1 hour a day on FB<br />About 70% of FB users are outside the U.S.<br />
    46. 46. Educators Use of Social Networks<br />61% have joined SN’s<br />85% Facebook<br />20% MySpace<br />76% of FB users rate their usage as “seldom or never”<br />There is low usage reported for education social networks<br />Educators would prefer to join an education-based social network<br />46,600 teachers<br />25,600 principals<br />10,700 library/media specialists<br />Online survey conducted blind and deployed by MMS Education <br />
    47. 47. 1 in 200<br />page views on the Internet<br />(NY Times, 2007) <br />Most Page Views on the Internet<br />Wikipedia, love it or hate it…<br />
    48. 48. How should learning environments change as <br />information gets larger, grows faster,<br />and becomes more complex?<br />38<br />
    49. 49. Web 2.0 is version 1.0 for today’s learners<br />39<br />
    50. 50. LEGO Network - Mike<br />
    51. 51. Internet tools<br />www.wolframalpha.com Makes all systematic knowledge immediately computable<br />www.google.com/squared Creates a starter "square" of information, automatically fetching and organizing facts from across the web.<br />www.google.com Google Wonder Wheel - a wheel display of relevant search terms.<br />
    52. 52. Microsoft Pivot – visual search - Pivot makes it easier to interact with massive amounts of data in ways that are powerful, informative, and fun.<br />Google Goggles lets you search Google using pictures from your camera phones. <br />42<br />
    53. 53. 43<br />Student as Producer<br />
    54. 54. 44<br />Student as Producer<br />
    55. 55. Tools for Presenting (Free)<br />Xtranormal | Text-to-Movie<br />Xtranormal | Text-to-Movie. ...xtranormal Demo. By:xtranormal. Make a movie now with one of these showpaks!<br />Prezi - The Zooming Presentation Editor<br />Prezi is the zooming presentation editor. ... Using Prezi. Register · Getting started · Terms of Use.<br />Wordle - Beautiful Word Clouds<br />Wordle is a toy for generating “word clouds” from text that you provide. The clouds give greater prominence to words that appear more frequently<br />http://www.mlkonline.net/dream.html<br />Glogster – Poster Yourself | Text, Images, Music and Video<br />Glogster.com - Poster yourself - Make your interactive poster easily and share it with friends. Mix Images, Text, Music and Video. It is fantastic!<br />
    56. 56. It’s About Bringing Information to You!<br />Teacher Flake<br />
    57. 57. Classroom Technology<br />Technology designed to engage students<br />Teacher Devices<br />Interactive Whiteboard<br />Classroom Projector<br />Device Cart<br />Classroom Printer<br />Classroom Device<br />Wireless Network<br />Student Devices<br />
    58. 58. Teaching the iGeneration<br />48<br />
    59. 59. Twitter- agarry22<br />E-mail- adam_garry@dell.com<br />Delicious- http://del.icio.us/agarry/vision<br />Glogster- http://agarry22.glogster.com/information/<br />Wiki<br />http://nelsoncounty.pbworks.com<br />
    60. 60. 21st Century Learning Activity<br />PART ONE<br />At your table make a list of the all the skills or concepts that students should master if they are going to be 21st Century Learners. <br />Be ready to share you list with the group. Be creative with how you share your list. <br />www.wordle.net<br />Tagxedo<br />prezi.com<br />http://edu.glogster.com/<br />Word, PowerPoint, MovieMaker<br />www.xtranormal.com/ <br />voicethread.com<br />storybird<br />50<br />
    61. 61. XTRANORMAL<br />51<br />http://www.xtranormal.com/watchmovies/<br />
    62. 62. Digital Story: MovieMaker<br />52<br />SAMPLE<br />PRESENTATION<br />
    63. 63. 21st Century Learners<br />Skills to Master<br />Concepts to Learn<br />SAMPLE<br />PRESENTATION<br />
    64. 64. Social Networking<br />Communication is easier every day. <br />Social networking sites<br />Edublogs – promoting interest in classes<br />Youtube – How to, tutorials, alternate learning methods<br />Virtual Campus<br />Help one-another with their problems in and out of the classroom.<br />SAMPLE<br />PRESENTATION<br />
    65. 65. SAMPLE<br />PRESENTATION<br />
    66. 66. Internet/Social Networks =<br />Problem FINDING.<br />Near infinite resources<br />NEW or ALTNERATE ideas <br />SAMPLE<br />PRESENTATION<br />
    67. 67. Classroom Example – Observation<br />Fairfax County Public Schools Global Awareness 5 minute video (2009) 5th grade social studies/technology class -- Colvin Run Elem School <br />http://www.fcps.edu/DIT/streaming/preview_socialstudies.asx<br />57<br />
    68. 68. 21st Century Learning Activityhgipembina.pbworks.com<br />PART TWO<br />Compare the lists that you created to the TIPc document from Henrico, the 21st Century Skills website, Teaching Standards, LoTi. <br />Is there anything you left out? What would you add? How will you assess these skills and concepts?<br />To create a document for your district you can: <br />Use one of the documents shared and make some edits <br />Combine two documents to make one vision document<br />Start from scratch<br />58<br />
    69. 69. 59<br />
    70. 70. 60<br />
    71. 71. Dell Professional Learning Options<br />A conceptual framework for understanding professional learning for schools <br />Professional Growth<br />Training<br />Experience<br />61<br />
    72. 72. What is Professional Learning?<br />Professional Development Professional Learning<br />Past<br />Present<br />To eliminate this confusion with our customers, we want to define the outcomes of the professional learning opportunities in the beginning when we scope out a plan for their Connected Classroom initiative.<br /><ul><li>Often, school districts and vendors describe other types of professional learning opportunities as Professional Development but it is not delivered as the way NSDC describes what PD should look like.</li></li></ul><li>EXPERIENCE<br />This is an opportunity to explore new learning without making any commitment to implementation or change in practice and/or with no expectation of impacting student learning.<br />63<br />
    73. 73. Experience Structures<br />Educators gain experiences in many ways. Some of the most common are listed below:<br /><ul><li>Conferences
    74. 74. Guest speakers at meetings
    75. 75. Team building activities
    76. 76. Book-study
    77. 77. University courses
    78. 78. Articles
    79. 79. Summer institutes</li></ul>64<br />
    80. 80. TRAINING<br />This type is typically required to carry out management or process tasks. There is a level of expectation that the new learning will change practice in someway, but with no direct link to or measurement of student learning.<br />65<br />
    81. 81. Training Structures<br />Training can be delivered through many different venues and in a variety of delivery modes. <br /><ul><li>Workshops
    82. 82. Seminars
    83. 83. Courses
    84. 84. Independent Study Modules
    85. 85. Facilitated Modules
    86. 86. Face-to-face delivery
    87. 87. Virtual Environments</li></ul>66<br />
    88. 88. PROF DEVELOPMENT/GROWTH<br />There is an expectation that the new learning will be implemented (with appropriate support) in the classroom to change teacher practice. There is also an expectation that this change in practice impact student learning.<br />
    89. 89. What is Professional Development?<br />NSDC definition and study states:<br />The term “professional development” means a comprehensive, substantiated, and intensive approach to improving teachers’ and principals’ effectiveness in raising student achievement<br />Effective professional development is intensive, ongoing, and connected to practice; focuses on the teaching and learning of specific academic content; is connected to other school initiatives; and builds strong working relationships among teachers. <br />Hammond, L. (Ed.). (2009). Professional Learning in the Learning Profession. (1st ed., Dallas: NSDC.<br />
    90. 90. Professional Development /Growth Structures<br />There are a variety of structures that can be used to facilitate the professional development/growth cycle. They include:<br />Professional Learning Community<br />School-wide teaching/learning initiatives<br />Topic specific study groups<br />Book study using a study group format<br />University courses<br />Summer institutes<br />Topic specific taskforce<br />69<br />
    91. 91. Professional <br />Growth <br />Cycle<br />Assess<br />Learn<br />Reflect<br />Implement<br />
    92. 92. Professional Development for School Leaders<br />Leadership Coaching<br />Dell provides leadership coaching and the building level to support connected classroom and one-to-many implementations. Key highlights of this offering:<br /><ul><li>Consultant works in the school building with leadership teams to visit classrooms
    93. 93. School and district develops common language around language
    94. 94. The learning is differentiated for the school leaders
    95. 95. Schools defines the leadership team they want to develop
    96. 96. Conversation are about teaching and learning and how technology can support that environment
    97. 97. Define next steps are identified</li></li></ul><li>It has tolerated a lot of sloppy thinking, practice, and results. It has not been willing to ‘call out’ ineffective practice and ineffective policy. ... It has not devoted attention to outcomes.”- M. Hayes Mizell, a distinguished senior fellow at Learning Forward<br />
    98. 98. “We’ve recognized professional development as important, but we don’t have very clear standards for what we’re looking for and we don’t have much accountability for what teachers engage in,” said Jennifer King Rice, a professor of education policy at the University of Maryland College Park. “It opens the floodgates for just about anything to be called professional development.”<br />
    99. 99. “We should start where students’ weaknesses and shortcomings are and then seek strategies or techniques to help [teachers] understand those shortcomings.”- Thomas Guskey<br />
    100. 100. 75<br />Confidential<br />Thank You<br />
    101. 101. Schools have mainly been about learning?<br />DELL CONFIDENTIAL<br />76<br />True<br />False<br />12 of 30<br />

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