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Snapshot : Open Data Ecosystem

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Snapshot : Open Data Ecosystem
Supply & Demand presented at AMLF 2012 by Craig Hammer World Bank Institute

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Snapshot : Open Data Ecosystem

  1. 1. Snapshot : Open Data Ecosystem Supply & Demand Craig Hammer World Bank Institute 1  
  2. 2. What  does  a  21st  century     Journalist  look  like?    What  does  a  21st  century     newsroom  look  like?   2  
  3. 3. THE WORLD BANKWorking for a World Free of PovertyFinancing  for  projects  and  reforms  Knowledge,  research,  and  data  Building  capacity  through  learning  
  4. 4. Aligning with Global Drivers of Change CiDzens  demand  accountability  and   parDcipaDon  in  governance   Sources  of  technical  &  development   knowledge   Responding  to  daunDng  development     challenges  with  innovaDve,  collaboraDve     soluDons   4  
  5. 5. Open Data Ecosystem          Supply  Side   Demand  Side   ‘opening’ of Public ownership of government data   open data   Support     5  
  6. 6. Supply-Side 6  
  7. 7. Typical Types of ‘Opened’ Data Facts  and  figures  about  people,  the  economy,  and  the  Sta4s4cal  Data   environment  -­‐  context  in  which  government  operates  Administra4ve   Day-­‐to-­‐day,  disaggregated  administraDon  and   execuDon  of  government:  budgets,  expenditures,   Data   resources,  performance,  locaDons,  availability  etc.   Poli4cal     The  what,  why  and  how  of  policy  decisions  and  official   government  acDvity.   Data     Public  reference  data  &  data  generated  by  the  naDons   Research  and   scienDfic  agencies  and  publicly  funded  research   insDtuDons    Reference  Data     7  
  8. 8. … but also•  Unstructured data not necessarily nice & neat 8  
  9. 9. And…  YOUR  DATA   9  
  10. 10. It’s  data  that’s  technically  open   What’s valuable data? … much more than you think! You  can  search  for  it  and  find  it  easily  online  It’s  available  in  an  editable  electronic  open or  an  API   It’s data that’s technically format   You can search for it and find it easily onlinePreference for availability in an editable electronic format ü   û   xls,  json,  txt,  csv,  xml,   PDF,  images  (JPG,  GIF,   html,  doc,  API,  odt,  ods   PNG),  other  proprietary   etc.   formats.   10  
  11. 11. It’s  data  that  is  legally  open     and  licensed  that  way     You  can  use  it  freely   You  can  re-­‐use  it  freely   You  can  redistribute  it  freely    For  commercial  and  non-­‐commercial  purposes   11  
  12. 12. Sources of high-value data }  Government  …  but  also   }  Media!   }  Mul4lateral  organiza4ons   }  Civil  society   }  Academia   }  The  ‘crowd’     12  
  13. 13. Why?   13  
  14. 14. <refrain>   More  data  =  more  knowledge     (public  and  private)  =  be%er  decisions   14  
  15. 15. Demand-Side 15  
  16. 16. Demand-Side   Be  demand  driven   Provide  context   Support  conversa4on   Build  capacity  &  skills  (media)   Collaborate  with  the  community    See  full  post  on  Tim  Davies’  blog:  hep://bit.ly/AaIrQe   16  
  17. 17. “Technology  amplifies     human  intent  and  capacity;    it  doesnt  subsDtute  for  them.”   Mobilize  ci4zens   Reduce  costs  of  parDcipaDon   Feedback  on  service  delivery  PlaSorms:  open  government  data   17  
  18. 18. Demand-Side: Entry Points   ParDcipaDon  &   CiDzen  feedback     CollecDve  acDon   oversight  by     using  ICT  non-­‐government  actors  •   Media   •   ICT    Knowledge   • Open  Govt  •   Civil  Society   …Plajorm   Partnership    •   Private  Sector   18  
  19. 19. <refrain>   More  data  =  more  knowledge     (public  and  private)  =  be%er  decisions   19  
  20. 20. Support 20  
  21. 21. Support: Knowledge & Capacity Structured     Prac44oner   Learning   Exchange   Learning   Knowledge  Exchange  •   Data  Journalism  Bootcamps   •   FacilitaDng  Knowledge  Exchange  •   E-­‐Learning  for  journalists   •   Support  for  Knowledge  Hubs  •   Scrape-­‐a-­‐thons   •   Support  for  exisDng  networks  •   Hackathons       21  
  22. 22. Tight  Collabora0on   & 22  
  23. 23. 23  
  24. 24. 24  
  25. 25. KENYA  Data  Journalism     Bootcamp   25  
  26. 26. …but  first  Achieving  Buy-­‐In  from  MEDIA  OWNERS     Media  Owners  Roundtable  on  the   business  case  for  data-­‐driven  reporDng.       Permanent  Secretary  Bitange  Ndemo   Addressed  these  Media  Owners     on  ‘Open  Data  and  the  Future  of  News’   26  
  27. 27. Knowledge exchange: Africa to World Open  Data   Tech   Knowledge   27  
  28. 28. Kenya to Moldova 28  
  29. 29. Competitions / Labs / Grand Challenges Innova4on   Innova4on   Scanning  &  Scaling   Scanning  &  Scaling   CompeDDons  &   Sustained  Follow-­‐up  &   WB  InnovaDon  Labs   Grand  Challenges   Apercare   •   CompeDDon  Plajorm   •  Hacks.Hackers   •   Mapping  (OpenAid)   •   Grand  Challenge   •   Code4Kenya   •   Geo-­‐coding  &  ICT   (Apps  for   •   Code4…   •     ???   Development,  Social   •   LasDng  engagement   •     ???   Development,  Sectoral,   e.g.  Water)   29  
  30. 30. Scaling  Up  and  Leveraging   • WB  Regions  and  Networks     • External  Partners  &  Donors   • Scholarships  Program     30  
  31. 31. <refrain>   More  data  =  more  knowledge     (public  and  private)  =  be%er  decisions   31  
  32. 32. Once  more…  What  does  a  21st  century     Journalist  look  like?    What  does  a  21st  century     newsroom  look  like?   32  
  33. 33. Lessons  we’re  learning  •  Individuals  and  organizaDons  need  to  adapt   and  learn  new  technologies  and  approaches.  •  Engagement  requires  ac4on  on  both  sides.  •  Don’t  let  the  good  be  the  enemy  of  the  best  •  Favor  simple  approaches  and  iterate!  •  Interested?      Come  see  us!   33  
  34. 34. Thanks! Craig Hammer World Bank Institutechammer@worldbank.org 34  
  35. 35. 35  
  36. 36. Mining & Visualizing DataSample support from the World Bank Craig Hammer World Bank Institute 36  
  37. 37. Plajorms:  open  government  data  •  NaDonal  Governments  •  Local  Governments  •  ScienDfic  InsDtuDons  •  InternaDonal  Agencies  •  Donors  &  Aid  Agencies  •  Philanthropies  •  Companies  •  Non-­‐profits   See:  hep://www.data.gov/opendatasites   37  
  38. 38. InnovaDve  SoluDons  Mapping,  Mobile  Phones  &  Social  Media  for  Results     More  Social   More  More  Local   InteracDve   Project  Level   Mapping   Social   Infrastructure   &   Local  Project   Results   Geo-­‐Stories   Connect  maps  to   Stories  and  Images   Nepal:  Health  Centers   Enhanced   Interac4vity   CDD  Project  in  Indonesia  Feedback  from  CiCzens   Geo-­‐Stories  from  Georgia  
  39. 39. 39  
  40. 40. 40  
  41. 41. CiDzens:  coding  for  their  country   41  
  42. 42. 42  
  43. 43. Journalists!   43  
  44. 44. 44  
  45. 45. Desarrollando  America  LaDna   45  
  46. 46. 46  
  47. 47. Lessons  we’re  learning  •  Open  Government  is  not  an  IT  project!  •  It’s  now  about  “co-­‐creaDon”  not  consultaDon  •  PoliDcal  backing  is  essenDal  •  Individuals  and  organizaDons  need  to  adapt   and  learn  new  technologies  and  approaches.  •  Engagement  requires  ac4on  on  both  sides.  •  Don’t  let  the  good  be  the  enemy  of  the  best  •  Favor  simple  approaches  and  iterate!   47  
  48. 48. What  does  a  21st  century     Journalist  look  like?    What  does  a  21st  century     newsroom  look  like?   48  
  49. 49. Thanks!Craig HammerWorld Bank Institute 49  
  50. 50. SOUTHERN  AFRICA   PFM-­‐Literacy     ‘Bootcamps’  for  Journalists   Craig  Hammer  of     Chris  Kabwato  of  Rhodes   WBI’s    Media  Development   University  and  Director  of   program  &  Co-­‐Convenor,     ParDcipants  in  the  WBI  and  Rhodes  University-­‐convened     Highway  Africa  &  Co-­‐ PFM-­‐Literacy  Bootcamp   PFM-­‐Literacy  Bootcamp  for  Southern  African  Media     Convenor,  PFM-­‐Literacy   (January  30-­‐31)  were  Business  and  Economics  journalists  from     Bootcamp   Kenya,  Mozambique,  South  Africa,  Tanzania,  Uganda,  Zambia,  and  Zimbabwe  Prasanna  Lal  Das,   Gert  Van  Der  Linde,  Lead   Sarwat  Hussein,  Hub   Joel  Kolker,  Reg.   Derek  Luyt,  the   Senior  Program   Financial  Specialist  in   Professor  Reg  Rumney  of   Leader  in  the   Coord.  for  East/ Public  Social   Officer  &  Lead,   AFTFM,  based  in  the     Rhodes  University  and  Director  the  Bank’s  Open   World  Bank’s  South   of  the  Centre  for  Economics   Africa  Region  in  The   Southern  Africa,  in   50   Accountability   World  Bank’s  South   WBG’s    SA  Country   Monitor,  South   Finance  team   Africa  Country  Office   Journalism  in  Africa   Africa  Country  Office   Office   Africa  
  51. 51. SUDAN   PFM-­‐Literacy    ‘Bootcamps’  for  Journalists   51  
  52. 52. BANGLADESH   PFM-­‐Literacy    ‘Bootcamps’  for  Journalists   52  

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