Agro-ecological knowledge & climate change adaptation in North central Namibia Andrew Newsham & David Thomas Date: 01:01:2...
What I’ll talk about: <ul><li>Uncertainty around climate impact projections in Namibia  </li></ul><ul><li>Agro-ecological ...
 
Discrepancies in climate information available <ul><li>The IPCC GCMs suggest a decrease in rainfall over Southern Africa, ...
(Natural resource-based) Livelihood activities in North-Central Namibia
 
 
Agro-ecological knowledge in North-Central Namibia  ‘ indigenous land unit (ILU) system (Hillyer  et al 2006 ) which farme...
<ul><li>Land classified according to topography, soil properties, depth of hardpan, soil-water dynamics and availability o...
Robustness & utility of local agro-ecological knowledge <ul><li>Conventional vegetation analysis of the ILUs found consist...
Agricultural extension & knowledge co-production <ul><li>Broad uptake of early maturing varieties of pearl millet – agricu...
Concluding remarks  <ul><li>Further thinking on knowledge co-production </li></ul><ul><li>Caveats about local knowledge  <...
Interactional and other forms of expertise (Collins 2004:125-7) <ul><li>Contributory expertise – capacity to  practice, ad...
But! Local knowledge is no panacea
Local knowledge in broader context and longer term perspective <ul><li>Climate change background is darkening  - how appro...
References <ul><li>Carolan, M.S., 2006. Sustainable agriculture, science and the co-production of ‘expert’ knowledge: The ...
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Andrew Newsham: Agro-ecological knowledge & climate change adaptation in North Central Namibia

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Andrew Newsham: Agro-ecological knowledge & climate change adaptation in North Central Namibia

  1. 1. Agro-ecological knowledge & climate change adaptation in North central Namibia Andrew Newsham & David Thomas Date: 01:01:2006
  2. 2. What I’ll talk about: <ul><li>Uncertainty around climate impact projections in Namibia </li></ul><ul><li>Agro-ecological knowledge as historical source of resilience to climate variability </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge co-production to enhance adaptive capacity </li></ul><ul><li>Ways to better understand conditions for knowledge co-production </li></ul><ul><li>Putting farming in the broader climate change and livelihoods context in Namibia </li></ul>
  3. 4. Discrepancies in climate information available <ul><li>The IPCC GCMs suggest a decrease in rainfall over Southern Africa, but downscaled modelling suggests an overall increase </li></ul><ul><li>So it’s uncertain what will happen to rainfall. It also limits the utility of this info as a guide to policy. </li></ul><ul><li>What other sources of information/knowledge might we turn to? </li></ul>
  4. 5. (Natural resource-based) Livelihood activities in North-Central Namibia
  5. 8. Agro-ecological knowledge in North-Central Namibia ‘ indigenous land unit (ILU) system (Hillyer et al 2006 ) which farmers use to determine how, what and where to farm in conditions of high rainfall variability – ‘ILUs’ therefore serve as a central factor in determining settlement patterns
  6. 9. <ul><li>Land classified according to topography, soil properties, depth of hardpan, soil-water dynamics and availability of annual and perennial grasses </li></ul>Source: Verlinden et al 06:316
  7. 10. Robustness & utility of local agro-ecological knowledge <ul><li>Conventional vegetation analysis of the ILUs found consistency in land units classified according to vegetation criteria (Verlinden & Dayot 2005) </li></ul><ul><li>Local knowledge as adaptive capacity to current climate variability – possibly also as proxy for adaptive capacity to future climate change? </li></ul>
  8. 11. Agricultural extension & knowledge co-production <ul><li>Broad uptake of early maturing varieties of pearl millet – agricultural science technology slotted into existing knowledge system as instance of knowledge co-production </li></ul><ul><li>Use of early maturing varieties enhanced resilience to climate variability </li></ul><ul><li>But! Co-production does not always happen (Hillyer et al 2006) and our understanding of it is incomplete </li></ul>
  9. 12. Concluding remarks <ul><li>Further thinking on knowledge co-production </li></ul><ul><li>Caveats about local knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Putting local knowledge in the broader context </li></ul>
  10. 13. Interactional and other forms of expertise (Collins 2004:125-7) <ul><li>Contributory expertise – capacity to practice, add to or modify a body of knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Interactional expertise – understand and interacts with contributory experts but not “full-blown practitioner” </li></ul>
  11. 14. But! Local knowledge is no panacea
  12. 15. Local knowledge in broader context and longer term perspective <ul><li>Climate change background is darkening - how appropriate in the long-term is making farming more resilient to climate change? </li></ul><ul><li>There are other changes going on for people too -> ‘deagrarianisation’ (shift away from agriculture as main livelihood activity in rural areas). Happening in Namibia and (to a lesser extent) in Omusati region </li></ul><ul><li>Diversification into climate insensitive activities seems a smart move... </li></ul><ul><li>But! Such diversification can reproduce poverty as well as reduce it – therefore deagrarianisation is a double-edged sword </li></ul>
  13. 16. References <ul><li>Carolan, M.S., 2006. Sustainable agriculture, science and the co-production of ‘expert’ knowledge: The value of interactional expertise. Local Environment: The International Journal of Justice and Sustainability , 11(4), 421. </li></ul><ul><li>Collins, H., 2004. Interactional expertise as a third kind of knowledge. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences, 3(2), 125-143. </li></ul><ul><li>Natanga, L (in prep), Is the great epistemic divide between local and scientific knowledge justifiable? A Namibian case study </li></ul><ul><li>Verlinden, A. and Dayot, B. (2005) 'A comparison between indigenous environmental knowledge and a conventional vegetation analysis in north central Namibia'. Journal of Arid Environments, 62, pp. 143-175. </li></ul><ul><li>Verlinden, A., Hillyer, A. E. M. and Seely, M. (2006) 'Settlement, trees and termites in Central North Namibia: A case of indigenous resource management'. Journal of Arid Environments, 66, pp. 307-335. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>

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