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Fitting technology options to farmer context in Mali

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Presented by Mary Ollenburger, Wageningen University and Research Centre, at the Africa RISING West Africa Review and Planning Meeting, Accra, 30 March–1 April 2016

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Fitting technology options to farmer context in Mali

  1. 1. Fitting technology options to farmer context in Mali Mary Ollenburger, Wageningen University and Research Centre Africa RISING West Africa Review and Planning Meeting, Accra, 30 March–1 April 2016
  2. 2. AfricaRISING sites in Mali
  3. 3. Maize Sorghum Soya Cowpea On-farm trials of options Options DIVERSIFICATIO NCROPS T2Ctrl T4T3 Intercrop Falconnier 2015
  4. 4. Analysis of on-farm trials Falconnier 2015
  5. 5. Average Sorghum yield on clay soils Average soybean yield on clay soils after cotton ΔGM = 334 USD/year/ha Analysis of on-farm trials Sorghum Soya Grain Yield (kg/ha) Grossmargin(USD/ha/year) Falconnier 2015
  6. 6. Options Niches for developing new systems Falconnier 2015
  7. 7. Falconnier et al. AgSys 2015
  8. 8. MRE farms – replacement of sorghum by soya HRE and HRE-LH farms – replacement of maize by maize-cowpea intercrop LRE farms – replacement of sorghum by cowpea 1 ox 1 cow 1 donkey/calf Farm-scale explorations: Trade-off analysis Falconnier 2015
  9. 9. Farm distributions 0 25 50 75 Farms Croparea(ha) Householdsize(numberofpeople) Household size Number of people Crops Cotton Maize Groundnut Rice Other 0 10 20 30 40 50 Farms Croparea(ha) Crops Cotton Maize Groundnut Rice Other 0 10 20 30 40 50 0 25 50 75 Household size Landcultivated(ha)
  10. 10. • Many scenarios, using limited data, to quickly explore options • Input data: • Household survey at district level for yields, input costs (AfricaRISING baselines), market survey for crop prices • Rapid characterization of population of 109 farm households in 3 villages (crop areas, livestock and equipment), plus detailed characterization of 19 farms based on types • Calculated income from crops and food self-sufficiency for each farm in several scenarios
  11. 11. • Yields • 50th percentile (median) yields [MARBES] • 90th percentile (best farmer practice) yields [MARBES] • Experimental potential yields [ICRISAT/IER] • Prices • Averaged market prices from monthly market survey in 2014-2015 • Calculated income and food self-sufficiency
  12. 12. • Current crop allocation • Optimized crop allocation • Maximize gross margins • Meet household calorie requirements with staple grains • Maize area < twice cotton area (fertilizer availability constraint) • Crop area expansion Land use scenarios Baseline Optimization at 90th percentile yield 0 20 40 60 a(ha) Crops Co Ma Gr
  13. 13. Yield Scenario ≥80% food self-sufficient ≥100% food self-sufficient Median 91% 79% Best farmer 99% 99% Potential 99% 99% • Median yields: most farms self-sufficient • All other scenarios: all but one farm is self-sufficient
  14. 14. Results: Gross Margins $1.25/person/day poverty level $1225 mean yearly income from gold mining Median Best farmer Potential C C C O O O
  15. 15. Results: Gross Margins $1.25/person/day poverty level $1225 mean yearly income from gold mining Median Best farmer Potential C O O O
  16. 16. What can we learn from simple scenarios? • “Rapid prototyping” of farm designs to explore potential • Estimating cost-benefit of a new technology should be a first step not a last step • Staple crop improvement research should target food- insecure households • Livestock and off-farm income income sources are important for improving livelihoods
  17. 17. Typologies for Targeting and Scaling • Simple indicators allow researchers to place farmers within types • Important to target a diverse group of farmers for testing technologies • Farmer evaluations can aid in analysis of variability and in targeting technologies to types • Ex-post typologies based on initial adoption can be useful for scaling
  18. 18. IFPRIARBES team Ousmane Sanogo, Institut d’Economie Rurale Mouvement Biologique Malienne ICRISATTechnicians The McKnight Foundation Africa Research in Sustainable Intensification for the Next Generation africa-rising.net

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