Overview of Africa Research in Sustainable Intensification for the Next
Generation (Africa RISING) and its Monitoring and ...
Overview of Africa RISING Program
Africa
RISING

A 5-year R4D program with 3 projects, an M&E and communications
• Cereal-...
Overview of Africa RISING Program
Outputs

•
•
•
•

Outcomes

• Sustainably  production and productivity
•  understandin...
M&E of Africa RISING Program
 Support effective project management
 Fulfill reporting requirements
 Generate knowledge ...
M&E Activities
 Mega-site stratification by drivers of SI and creation
of “development domains”
 Identification of repre...
Some M&E Challenges
 Sustainability and its dimensions: indicators and
benchmarks
 Compiling and verifying data on FtF i...
Impact Evaluation (IE)
 Evaluation questions
 Did the program contribute to program goal/objectives?
 Did it increase a...
IE Design (for Malawi)
Action Sites

Beneficiary HHs

Control Sites

Non-beneficiary HHs

Spillover
effects

Program
impac...
IE in Tanzania – RCT Design
 Babati district
 Research questions
 How does access to agricultural inputs impact
adoptio...
Some IE Challenges
 Practicality of and approaches to attribution of
cause and effect for an R4D program
 Selection of a...
Amesegnalehu!
Thank you!
Africa Research in Sustainable Intensification for the Next Generation

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Overview of Africa research in sustainable intensification for the next generation (Africa RISING) and its monitoring and evaluation (M&E)

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Presented by Beliyou Haile, IFPRI at the Africa RISING–CSISA Joint Monitoring and Evaluation Meeting, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 11-13 November 2013

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  • Integrating technological components into SI systems confers more benefits to smallholder farmers than single components.Integrating technological components into SI systems stimulates more adoption compared to single components.Targeting better tailored interventions that suit the context specific environments and the diverse local conditions in smallholder farms/households will lower environmental damageThe adoption of innovations that lead to SI is affected by the sequence in which the component technologies, practices, and knowledge are integrated and applied
  • Activities under this output aim at ensuring that best-bet or best-fit interventions are aligned to priority constraintsActivities under this output will test, validate, and adapt specific interventions aiming at farming system improvements
  • 4.5.2(2): Number of hectares under improved technologies or management practices as a result of USG assistance (RIA) (WOG)4.5.2(5): Number of farmers and others who have applied new technologies or management practices as a result of USG assistance (RIA) (WOG)4.5.2(7): Number of individuals who have received USG supported short-term agricultural sector productivity or food security training (RIA) (WOG)4.5.2(11): Number of food security private enterprises (for profit), producers organizations, water users associations, women's groups, trade and business associations, and community-based organizations (CBOs) receiving USG assistance (RIA) (WOG)4.5.2(12): Number of public-private partnerships formed as a result of FTF assistance (S)4.5.2(27): Number of members of producer organizations and community based organizations receiving USG assistance (S)4.5.2(39): Number of new technologies or management practices in one of the following phases of development: (Phase I/II/III) (S)4.5.2(42): (4.5.2-28) Number of private enterprises (for profit), producers organizations, water users associations, women's groups, trade and business associations, and community-based organizations (CBOs) that applied new technologies or management practicies as a result of USG assistance (RIA) (WOG)
  • Overview of Africa research in sustainable intensification for the next generation (Africa RISING) and its monitoring and evaluation (M&E)

    1. 1. Overview of Africa Research in Sustainable Intensification for the Next Generation (Africa RISING) and its Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Beliyou Haile, IFPRI Africa RISING–CSISA Joint Monitoring and Evaluation Meeting, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 11-13 November 2013
    2. 2. Overview of Africa RISING Program Africa RISING A 5-year R4D program with 3 projects, an M&E and communications • Cereal-based farming systems in the Guinea Savannah Zone of WA • Cereal-based farming systems in ESA • Crop-livestock systems of the Ethiopian Highlands Goal Create opportunities for smallholder farm households to move out of hunger and poverty through sustainable intensification(SI) Objectives • Identify and evaluate demand-driven options for SI • Evaluate/document/share innovative approaches for delivering and integrating innovations for SI • Create opportunities for program participants to move out of poverty and improve their nutrition • Facilitate partner-led dissemination of integrated innovations for SI Hypotheses • Integration, adoption, trade-off, scalability, sequencing
    3. 3. Overview of Africa RISING Program Outputs • • • • Outcomes • Sustainably  production and productivity •  understanding of ecosystem stability at a landscape level • Dissemination of integrated innovations beyond AR action sites Situation analysis Integrated systems improvement Scaling and delivery of integrated innovation Integrated M&E system • Improved livelihood through  agricultural output, diversified income,  vulnerability, and improved nutrition • Innovative approaches feeding into new development programs More info. http://africa-rising.net/ http://africa-rising.wikispaces.com/
    4. 4. M&E of Africa RISING Program  Support effective project management  Fulfill reporting requirements  Generate knowledge on what works  Data/analytical components of the M&E system  Delineation and characterization of target farming systems  Inventory of technologies  Ex ante evaluations  Attribution assessment
    5. 5. M&E Activities  Mega-site stratification by drivers of SI and creation of “development domains”  Identification of representative action research and control sites  Open access M&E data management platform  Reporting on FtF indicators  Household and community surveys  Site visits and focus groups  Meetings (survey design, project review & planning)
    6. 6. Some M&E Challenges  Sustainability and its dimensions: indicators and benchmarks  Compiling and verifying data on FtF indicators  Sequencing: selection of action sites before setting up of specific research activities  Engagement and communication (delays in recruitment of local M&E coordinators  Delays in baseline surveys
    7. 7. Impact Evaluation (IE)  Evaluation questions  Did the program contribute to program goal/objectives?  Did it increase agricultural productivity?  Are the program’s approaches replicable/scalable?  Did farmers adopt new/improved technology(s)/practices?  What are the tradeoffs among different impacts?  How does impact vary across different domains, geographies, household types, and gender?  Are the program-induced improvements sustainable?  Did the program demonstrate implementation methods that other projects can use?
    8. 8. IE Design (for Malawi) Action Sites Beneficiary HHs Control Sites Non-beneficiary HHs Spillover effects Program impact Control HHs
    9. 9. IE in Tanzania – RCT Design  Babati district  Research questions  How does access to agricultural inputs impact adoption?  How does training impact adoption?  Is there complementarity between input and training?  Are there any distributional effects? What explains the variance?  Thus far: training, coupons, input distribution  Monitoring and household survey to follow
    10. 10. Some IE Challenges  Practicality of and approaches to attribution of cause and effect for an R4D program  Selection of action sites and/or subjects  Conflicting incentives  Attribution with small N (action sites, beneficiary households) – generalizability of results  Impact of a “bundle of interventions”
    11. 11. Amesegnalehu! Thank you!
    12. 12. Africa Research in Sustainable Intensification for the Next Generation africa-rising.net

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