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Healthy Heart Campaign:  Ten Tips to Getting Started ALISON RANDOLPH  TRANE Commercial Systems  Health & Productivity Mana...
Employee wellness program benefits <ul><li>Preventable illnesses account for 70% of illness-related costs in the United St...
Why Start a Work-site Wellness Program? <ul><li>Non-Medical “Costs” of Unhealthy Lifestyles </li></ul><ul><li>High absente...
Tangible & Intangible Benefits <ul><li>Reductions in sick leave absenteeism </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce use of health benefit...
<ul><li>The population is characterized as captive  </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Typically employees are at work 5 days a wee...
All Parties can Benefit <ul><li>Employees:  </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Increased knowledge about the relationship between l...
<ul><li>For Employers:  </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Increased worker morale </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Increased wo...
 
<ul><li>TEN TIPS TO GETTING STARTED </li></ul>
1. Leadership <ul><li>Wellness Program Leaders need to be motivated and have time to concentrate on the time constraints o...
<ul><ul><li>Create a Wellness Committee </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Employees  </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Seni...
2. Gain Support from Management <ul><li>Support from management is essential to building a successful wellness program. Vi...
How Management can help **Always remember to provide the same opportunities for all employees** Lifestyle Health Conscious...
Fostering Wellness Leadership: A New Model <ul><ul><li>Manager’s Attitudes Toward Wellness </li></ul></ul>
3. Get in touch with your Community <ul><ul><li>Get in touch with local community resources  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><l...
<ul><ul><li>Create a community advisory committee.  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A community advisory committee can help you...
4. Identify <ul><ul><li>Health Literacy level of employees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Population Base </li></ul></ul><ul><...
5. Assess local health trends <ul><ul><li>At risks areas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Smoking, weight, sedentary lifesty...
Collecting Data   <ul><ul><li>Moves program from activity-centered to results oriented </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Facilita...
Estimated Societal Cost of Selected Health Problems: 2004 * In billions of dollars per year 2006 Wellness Councils of Amer...
6. Begin Planning <ul><ul><li>Once you identify and assess your population you will identify your large at-risk population...
<ul><li>Every wellness program should have a “core” but should still address multiple concentrations </li></ul><ul><li>“ H...
<ul><ul><li>Specific goals and measurable objectives ( SMART )  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>S pecific </li></ul></ul></...
Vision Statement <ul><ul><li>Provides direction and principles to keep program connected and focused  </li></ul></ul><ul><...
#7 Marketing and Publicity of the Healthy Heart Sessions <ul><ul><li>You must use many means of communication to get the w...
Tips For Using Incentives   <ul><ul><li>Make incentives crystal clear </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make rewards highly value...
#8 Be Prepared <ul><ul><li>Plan as far in advance as possible </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>guest speakers </li></ul></ul...
#9 Be Flexible <ul><li>Be Prepared but also be willing to change your subject if needed: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For example...
<ul><ul><li>Targets: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Participation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Satisfaction </li></...
Consider This… <ul><li>81%  of companies surveyed offered at least one health promotion activity </li></ul><ul><li>27%  co...
<ul><ul><li>Document program outcomes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Opportunity to identify best practice </li></ul></ul><ul>...
<ul><li>1 st  year: concentrate on health awareness </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>For many employees this will be the first ti...
The Challenge of Behavior Change
<ul><li>Some ideas to get you started. </li></ul>
INDIVIDUAL BEHAVIOR CHANGE <ul><li>· Encourage Workstation Stretching Techniques </li></ul><ul><li>· Organize a Healthy Po...
ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT & POLICIES <ul><li>· Organize Activities Around Health Theme Months </li></ul><ul><li>· Subsidi...
COMMUNITY COLLABORATION <ul><li>· Organize a Health-Related Speaker Series or Lunch-Hour  Discussion Groups </li></ul><ul>...
PHYSICAL WORK ENVIRONMENT <ul><li>· Change Vending Machine Snacks to Lowfat Items </li></ul><ul><li>· Place Announcements ...
Next Steps <ul><ul><li>Questions for consideration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What elements of a Wellness Program have...
Define Success
References And Useful Resources   <ul><li>American Journal of Health Promotion  http://www.healthpromotionjournal.com/ </l...
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Ten Tips to Starting a Wellness Program

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Ten Tips to Starting a Wellness Program

  1. 1. Healthy Heart Campaign: Ten Tips to Getting Started ALISON RANDOLPH TRANE Commercial Systems Health & Productivity Manager Lexington, KY
  2. 2. Employee wellness program benefits <ul><li>Preventable illnesses account for 70% of illness-related costs in the United States </li></ul><ul><li>Fitness programs reduce employer healthcare costs by 20% to 50% </li></ul><ul><li>Unhealthy individuals have decreased productivity and an increased rate of absenteeism…reducing one health risk increases a person’s productivity on the job by 9% and reduces absenteeism by 2% </li></ul><ul><li>On average…for every $1 a company spends on workplace wellness programs, an average net benefit of $3.40 to $7.88 is experienced from improved productivity, and reductions in use of sick leave and health insurance premiums; </li></ul>
  3. 3. Why Start a Work-site Wellness Program? <ul><li>Non-Medical “Costs” of Unhealthy Lifestyles </li></ul><ul><li>High absenteeism </li></ul><ul><li>High workers’ compensation </li></ul><ul><li>High disability claims </li></ul><ul><li>Excessive medical leave </li></ul><ul><li>Significant productivity loss </li></ul><ul><li>Excess worker conflict </li></ul><ul><li>Early medical retirements </li></ul>
  4. 4. Tangible & Intangible Benefits <ul><li>Reductions in sick leave absenteeism </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce use of health benefit </li></ul><ul><li>Reduced workers’ compensation </li></ul><ul><li>Reduced injury experience </li></ul><ul><li>Reduced presenteesim losses </li></ul><ul><li>Improvements in employee morale </li></ul><ul><li>Increased employee loyalty </li></ul><ul><li>Less organizational conflict </li></ul><ul><li>More Productive work force </li></ul><ul><li>Improved employee decision-making ability </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>The population is characterized as captive </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Typically employees are at work 5 days a week and this large group is essentially captive due to the nature of the workday. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>There is an excellent potential for effective behavioral incentives. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Incentives, can add a significantly larger impact to a program's effect on the participation and health behavior of employees and their family members. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>The potential to influence behavior is high. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Repeated exposure possibilities associated with the worksite, along with the large number of people exposed to education, communications, and incentives. Worksite is probably the greatest of any social setting in American Society. </li></ul></ul></ul>Why at Work?
  6. 6. All Parties can Benefit <ul><li>Employees: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Increased knowledge about the relationship between lifestyle and health </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Increased opportunity to take control of their health and medical treatment </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Improved health and quality of life through reduction of risk factors </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reduced pain and suffering from illness and accidents </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reduced work absences </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Increased morale via management’s interest in their health and well-being. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Increased opportunity for support from co-workers and environment </li></ul></ul></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>For Employers: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Increased worker morale </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Increased work productivity </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Informed and health care cost-conscious workforce </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Positive public relations </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Opportunity for cost savings: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reduced sick leave absenteeism </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reduced disability claims </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Decreased health care utilization </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reduced premature retirement </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Decreased overall health benefit costs </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Fewer on the job accidents </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lower casualty insurance costs </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  8. 9. <ul><li>TEN TIPS TO GETTING STARTED </li></ul>
  9. 10. 1. Leadership <ul><li>Wellness Program Leaders need to be motivated and have time to concentrate on the time constraints of their Wellness Campaigns. </li></ul>
  10. 11. <ul><ul><li>Create a Wellness Committee </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Employees </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Senior & mid-level managers </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Communication staff </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>HR staff </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Safety staff </li></ul></ul></ul>Assembling an Effective Team
  11. 12. 2. Gain Support from Management <ul><li>Support from management is essential to building a successful wellness program. Visible senior management support is one of the most vital factors in the success of a worksite health promotion program. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Senior management executives are responsible for making sure that the organization meets its objectives. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They can provide additional assistance by helping connect your health promotion objectives to overall business outcomes, thereby positioning health promotions as a fundamental part of the organization. </li></ul></ul>
  12. 13. How Management can help **Always remember to provide the same opportunities for all employees** Lifestyle Health Conscious “ Walk the Walk” Create Budget Incentives/Program Supplies MODELING FISCALLY
  13. 14. Fostering Wellness Leadership: A New Model <ul><ul><li>Manager’s Attitudes Toward Wellness </li></ul></ul>
  14. 15. 3. Get in touch with your Community <ul><ul><li>Get in touch with local community resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Local Representatives: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Health Department, American Heart Association, American Cancer, Occupational Healthcare providers, and other community outreach programs. Ask around! </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>National Representatives: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>CDC, Diabetes Prevention </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  15. 16. <ul><ul><li>Create a community advisory committee. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A community advisory committee can help you identify your local health risks and health trends. As well as provide you with free resources, guest speaking, and door prizes. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Meet twice a year. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Once before planning for the New Year. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Include both local and national representatives. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Include various employees (nurses, HR, hourly, salary, etc. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  16. 17. 4. Identify <ul><ul><li>Health Literacy level of employees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Population Base </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Most successful teaching style for your employees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>lecture, video, group activity </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Resources available </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Brochures, handouts, and other educational tools </li></ul></ul></ul>
  17. 18. 5. Assess local health trends <ul><ul><li>At risks areas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Smoking, weight, sedentary lifestyle </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Statistics </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Health Fair biometric results </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Blood Pressure, Weight, etc </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Health Assessments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Helps to identify your worksite’s strengths and areas in need of improvement. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Can also help you determine what you are needing to measure in your evaluation. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  18. 19. Collecting Data <ul><ul><li>Moves program from activity-centered to results oriented </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Facilitates specificity of company health concerns </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides baseline and comparison data </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increases likelihood employees will accept wellness </li></ul></ul>Drive Results
  19. 20. Estimated Societal Cost of Selected Health Problems: 2004 * In billions of dollars per year 2006 Wellness Councils of America National Safety Council $7,836 $1022.50 Work Injuries American Cancer Society $841 $110.80 Cancer National Heart Lung & Blood Institute $752 $99.10 Lung Disease National Safety Council $522 $58.80 Back Pain Nation Institute of Alcoholism & Alcohol abuse $2,217 $292.1 Alcohol Abuse National Heart Lung & Blood Institute, NIH $2,715 $357.70 Heart Disease Original Source Per Employee Annual Cost Annual Cost* Health Problem/Condition
  20. 21. 6. Begin Planning <ul><ul><li>Once you identify and assess your population you will identify your large at-risk population. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Begin planning your classes concentrating on the Mental, Physical and Emotional aspects of health. </li></ul></ul>
  21. 22. <ul><li>Every wellness program should have a “core” but should still address multiple concentrations </li></ul><ul><li>“ Healthy Heart” </li></ul>smoking Blood Pressure Obesity Stress Management Back Pain Cholesterol Nutrition Cancer Diabetes Physical Activity
  22. 23. <ul><ul><li>Specific goals and measurable objectives ( SMART ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>S pecific </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>M easurable </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>A chievable </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>R ealistic </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>T ime sensitive </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Articulate roles and responsibilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Itemized budget </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Communication strategies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Vision/mission statement </li></ul></ul>Example : By January 2009, 10% of employees will be attending the Healthy heart program.
  23. 24. Vision Statement <ul><ul><li>Provides direction and principles to keep program connected and focused </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Vision statements should be no more than 1 or 2 sentences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Descriptive of the program and should fit with the company’s core business </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Program purpose clearly understood by simply reading the vision statement </li></ul></ul><ul><li>To promote employee accountability to be smart, be healthy, be responsible and be safe </li></ul>International Truck & Engine Corp. Sample Vision
  24. 25. #7 Marketing and Publicity of the Healthy Heart Sessions <ul><ul><li>You must use many means of communication to get the word out about your program </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Posters surrounding the worksite </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>All employee emails </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Word of mouth </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Newsletters </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Intercom announcements </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>Key to Success!
  25. 26. Tips For Using Incentives <ul><ul><li>Make incentives crystal clear </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make rewards highly valued </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Give a choice of rewards </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Deliver rewards quickly </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rewards should be consistent with wellness messages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Publicize, remind and communicate </li></ul></ul>
  26. 27. #8 Be Prepared <ul><ul><li>Plan as far in advance as possible </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>guest speakers </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>PowerPoint's </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Videos </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Handouts </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Snacks </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Prizes/Incentives </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make sure you have enough for all attendees </li></ul></ul>
  27. 28. #9 Be Flexible <ul><li>Be Prepared but also be willing to change your subject if needed: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For example if a health trend or concern needs to be addressed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Staph infections, workplace violence, popular diet fad, or any other media induced concern </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  28. 29. <ul><ul><li>Targets: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Participation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Satisfaction </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Improvements in knowledge, attitude and behavior </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Improvement in biometric measures </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Physical environment and company culture </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Productivity </li></ul></ul></ul>#10 Evaluation
  29. 30. Consider This… <ul><li>81% of companies surveyed offered at least one health promotion activity </li></ul><ul><li>27% conduct needs assessments </li></ul><ul><li>17% of worksites offering health promotion activities have a formal written set of goals and objectives </li></ul><ul><li>12% of those surveyed conduct formal evaluations </li></ul>Wellness Councils of America - 2005
  30. 31. <ul><ul><li>Document program outcomes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Opportunity to identify best practice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Verify improvement recommendations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Secure future funding </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Leverage to link wellness programs to health benefits plan </li></ul></ul>Consistently Evaluating Outcomes “ If you don’t know where you are going, you will probably end up somewhere else.” L. Peters
  31. 32. <ul><li>1 st year: concentrate on health awareness </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>For many employees this will be the first time to hear this information. Concentrate on key points and keep it simple. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>2 nd year: concentrate on health behavior </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>go more in-depth with the subjects you covered the year before. Evaluate for individual lifestyle and behavior change. </li></ul></ul></ul>What to expect..
  32. 33. The Challenge of Behavior Change
  33. 34. <ul><li>Some ideas to get you started. </li></ul>
  34. 35. INDIVIDUAL BEHAVIOR CHANGE <ul><li>· Encourage Workstation Stretching Techniques </li></ul><ul><li>· Organize a Healthy Potluck, Including a Recipe Exchange </li></ul><ul><li>· Provide Self-Care Health Guides to All Employees </li></ul><ul><li>· Target Holidays and Summer Months for Fitness/Nutrition </li></ul><ul><li>· Facilitate Team-Building Activities for Work Groups </li></ul><ul><li>· Put Together a “Walking Club” for Employees </li></ul>
  35. 36. ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT & POLICIES <ul><li>· Organize Activities Around Health Theme Months </li></ul><ul><li>· Subsidize Fitness/Health Club Memberships </li></ul><ul><li>· Send Periodic Health Tips Via E-mail, Flyers, </li></ul><ul><li>Newsletters, Payroll Inserts, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>· Create Departmental Competitions for Miles Walked, </li></ul><ul><li>Weight Lost, Hours of Exercise, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>· Acknowledge Participants in Flyers and/or Newsletters </li></ul><ul><li>· Organize Company Olympics to Encourage Exercise </li></ul><ul><li>and Team-Building </li></ul>
  36. 37. COMMUNITY COLLABORATION <ul><li>· Organize a Health-Related Speaker Series or Lunch-Hour Discussion Groups </li></ul><ul><li>· Ask a Local Restaurant to Conduct a Low fat Cooking Class </li></ul><ul><li>· Sponsor a Community Event (e.g. 5K, 10K) and Encourage </li></ul><ul><li>Participation of Employees and Their Families </li></ul><ul><li>· Have a Contest for Employees’ Children to Create Health </li></ul><ul><li>Promotional Posters for Work </li></ul><ul><li>· Sponsor School/Parks/Recreation Programs for Health </li></ul><ul><li>· Get Healthy Local Vendors to Sponsor Your </li></ul><ul><li>Company Contests </li></ul>
  37. 38. PHYSICAL WORK ENVIRONMENT <ul><li>· Change Vending Machine Snacks to Lowfat Items </li></ul><ul><li>· Place Announcements on Stairwells to Encourage Walking </li></ul><ul><li>· Identify CPR/First Aid Trained Employees by Displaying a </li></ul><ul><li>“ Red Cross” at Their Workstations </li></ul><ul><li>· Display Signs to Encourage Safe Lifting, Seat Belt Use, </li></ul><ul><li>Use of Personal Protective Equipment, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>· Create and Maintain a Health Bulletin Board </li></ul><ul><li>· Designate a Quiet Room for Relaxation/Meditation </li></ul>
  38. 39. Next Steps <ul><ul><li>Questions for consideration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What elements of a Wellness Program have you identified as improvement opportunities? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Would your employer benefit from Wellness Program </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Identify one key element you will complete when returning to your worksite </li></ul></ul></ul>
  39. 40. Define Success
  40. 41. References And Useful Resources <ul><li>American Journal of Health Promotion http://www.healthpromotionjournal.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Healthy Living, http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyLiving/ </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy People 2010 http:www .healthypeople.gov </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy Workforce 2010: An Essential Health Promotion Sourcebook for Employers, Large and Small . 2001, Partnership for Prevention: Washington, DC. </li></ul><ul><li>O'Donnell, M., Health Promotion in the Workplace . 3rd ed. 2001, Albany, NY </li></ul><ul><li>Prevention Makes Common Cents .2003, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: Washington, DC </li></ul><ul><li>The Wellness Councils of America http:www.welcoa.org </li></ul>     

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