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76walker180-Stimulating Active Student Learning Through Strategies of Engaged Discomfort

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This presentation discusses the possibilities of active/participatory pedagogy. The objective is to engage students to better understand the spatialities of local, regional, national and global issues with the goal of becoming responsible global citizens. To do so, a tactic called engaged discomfort is employed. This strategy involves encouraging students to move outside of their comfort zones and engage in the geographies/learning spaces of discomfiture, which include classroom activities, fieldwork, and community service.

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76walker180-Stimulating Active Student Learning Through Strategies of Engaged Discomfort

  1. 1. David M. Walker. Ph.D Geographer Division of Social Sciences College of Southern Maryland La Plata, MD 20646 STIMULATING ACTIVE STUDENT LEARNING THROUGH STRATEGIES OF ENGAGED DISCOMFORT Session 7.6 January 12, 2018
  2. 2. DON’T LECTURE ME • Don’t Lecture Me: Rethinking How College Students Learn (Barsegian, 2011) • “Today’s students are active learners rather than spectators” (Luna Scott, 2015) • “…twenty-first century instruction is based on three pedagogical principles personalization, participation and productivity” (McLoughlin and Lee, 2008). • “Forming working relationships with teachers and partners in the community, and working collaboratively with peers will also contribute to productive learning experiences”. (Bolstad 2011) • Flipping the Classroom..”students are doing the lower levels of cognitive work (gaining knowledge and comprehension) outside of class, and focusing on the higher forms of cognitive work (application, analysis, synthesis, and/or evaluation) in class, where they have the support of their peers and instructor” (Brame, 2013)
  3. 3. 21ST CENTURY PEDAGOGY • make learning relevant to the ‘big picture’ • Teach through the discipline • develop lower and higher order thinking skills to encourage understanding in different contexts • encourage transfer of learning • teach how to ‘learn to learn’ or metacognition • promote teamwork • exploit technology to support learning • foster students’ creativity
  4. 4. ENGAGED DISCOMFORTURE
  5. 5. • Landscape analysis • Urban geography/ Urban gardens • Brownsville/ community mapping • Mapping your own data • Immigrantification • Think pair and share • Where does your breakfast come from? • Media responses • Group Country Presentation EXAMPLES OF ENGAGED DISCOMFORT COURSE WORK: WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY In the Classroom In the Field
  6. 6. COMMUNITY MAPPING
  7. 7. IMMIGRATIFICATION OF MORSE ROAD AND NORTHLAND Walker, David M. Dr. and Schemenauer, Jack (2014) "Immigrant Social-Economic Landscape Changes and Ethno-Racial Border Formation in Columbus, Ohio," Cultural Encounters, Conflicts, and Resolutions: Vol. 1: Iss. 2, Article 4.
  8. 8. IMMIGRANTIFICATION ON MORSE RD
  9. 9. IMMIGRANTIFICATION ON MORSE RD
  10. 10. EXEMPLARY SORT OF WHAT PEOPLE WOULD LIKE TO SEE NEAR THEIR HOME
  11. 11. IMMIGRANTIFICATION The process whereby immigrants revitalize and save blighted neighborhoods (abandoned due to irresponsible suburban development and white flight) through investments in small businesses and the re-creation of vibrant urban landscapes.
  12. 12. • Port Tobacco Creek: Stream flow analysis • Port Tobacco: Erosion and Landscape Changes • Zekiah Swamp: Cycles and Patterns in the Biosphere • Graveyard Fieldwork: Gravestone weathering, St. Ignatius Catholic Church Graveyard • Think pair and share • Group Chapter Presentations • Article/Chapter Report and presentation EXAMPLES OF ENGAGED DISCOMFORT COURSE WORK: PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY/LAB In the Classroom In the Field
  13. 13. TRAVEL STUDY-THE ULTIMATE ENGAGED DISCOMFORT LEARNING EXPERIENCE
  14. 14. ENGAGED DISCOMFORTURE: STEM (MATH) https://danceequations.com/
  15. 15. ENGAGED DISCOMFORTURE • “Normally when we go on a college fieldtrip [field excursion/theory-to- practice/active pedagogy] we are always in a very controlled environment– we don’t really get a chance to get our hands dirty– but on the Cincinnati trip we did just that… we went to places I would never have gone…”
  16. 16. POSITIVE OUTCOMES : STUDENTS LEARN … • To work in groups • To communicate with diverse sets of people • How what they learn in school is relevant to what goes on in the world around them • How to use technology • Problem solving • How to communicate
  17. 17. FUTURE ENGAGED DISCOMFORT OPPORTUNITIES • The revitalization of urban space: Murals and Public Art in D.C. and Baltimore • Immigrant communities and economic recuperation of first tier suburbs in Maryland and Virginal • Coastal Processes and Terrain: Calvert Cliffs • Atmospheric disturbances/re-photography: Downtown La Plata: • Development and Landscape changes Hughesville Campus’ New Health Sciences Facility
  18. 18. TRAVEL STUDY POSSIBILITIES • Grassroots Renewable Energy Movements: Nicaragua • Implementing Geographic Technology to Preserve a Paradise: Costa Rica • Bio Geography, Organic Coffee and Indigeneity in Oaxaca, Mexico
  19. 19. REFERENCES • Bolstad, R. 2011. Taking a ‘Future Focus’ in Education – What Does It Mean? NZCER Working Paper. Wellington, New Zealand Council for Educational Research. www.nzcer.org.nz/ system/files/taking-future-focus-in-education.pdf (Accessed 01/10/2018). • Barseghian T. 2013 Don’t Lecture Me: Rethinking How College Students Learn. Mind Shift: How we Learn (on line) https://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2011/09/13/dont-lecture- me-rethinking-how-college-students-learn/ (last accesses 01/10/2018) • Brame, C. 2013. Flipping the classroom. Vanderbilt University Center for Teaching (online). http://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guidessub- pages/flipping-the-classroom/ (Accessed 01/10/2018). • Cynthia Luna Scott. 2015. THE FUTURES of LEARNING 3: What kind of pedagogies for the 21st century? UNESCO Education Research and Foresight, Paris. [ERF Working Papers Series, No. 15]. • McLoughlin, C. and Lee, The three p’s of pedagogy for the networked society: personalization, participation, and productivity. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, Vol. 20, No. 1, pp. 10-27. http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ895221.pdf (Accessed 01/10/2018). • Walker, David M. Dr. and Schemenauer, Jack (2014) "Immigrant Social-Economic Landscape Changes and Ethno-Racial Border Formation in Columbus, Ohio," Cultural Encounters, Conflicts, and Resolutions: Vol. 1: Iss. 2, Article 4. Available at: http://engagedscholarship.csuohio.edu/cecr/vol1/iss2/4

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