53 accessibility to broadcasting and telecommunications the canadian experience

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53 accessibility to broadcasting and telecommunications the canadian experience

  1. 1. ACCESSIBILITY TO BROADCASTING AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS: THE CANADIAN EXPERIENCE Martine Vallee Director Social & Consumer Policy Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commmission
  2. 2. CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CRTC) Regulate BROADCASTINGINDEPENDENT & PUBLIC TELECOMMUNICATIONS TRIBUNAL SYSTEMS Supervise 2
  3. 3. CRTC MANDATEENSURE BROADCASTING AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS SERVE THE PUBLIC INTEREST Economic Accessibility: addressed in Broadcasting & Telecommunications KEY Legislation OBJECTIVES SET OUT IN LEGISLATION Cultural Social 3
  4. 4. WHY IS ACCESSIBILITY TO COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES IMPORTANT? BROADCASTING TELECOMMUNICATIONS Participation in SocietyCanadians with Social Integration Canadians withdisabilities disabilitiesshould be able to Employment should havereceive, and see same ability to asthemselves, in Access to Information other users ofbroadcast telephone toprogramming Public Safety communicate 4
  5. 5. ACCESSIBILITY FRAMEWORK Concept of Reasonable AccommodationBalance Needs With Other Objectives Based On Human Rights Principles EQUALITY 5
  6. 6. ACCESSIBILITY POLICY TOOLKITRegulations / ObligationsExpectations / EncouragementsCo-Regulation – Industry/Communitydeveloped solutionsConsultationsMediation 6
  7. 7. BROADCASTING All programming (English & French)Advertising, CLOSED Closedsponsorship captioning messages, CAPTIONING quality promos POLICY standards e.g. accuracy rate, format, lag time Monitoring systems 7
  8. 8. BROADCASTING DESCRIBED VIDEO & AUDIO DESCRIPTION POLICY BROADCASTING DISTRIBUTORS DESCRIBED VIDEO WORKING BROADCASTERS GROUP (CABLE & SATELLITE)• AD all key elements of • Pass through all DV signals • Promote awareness of DV Canadian information • Simple means to access DV (PSA, online DV guide) programs signal • Solutions to technical issues• 4 hours of DV per week (2 hours original DV)• Maintain spending on DV• Present DV logo & audio announcement• Provide information on DV programs• The Accessible Channel DESCRIBED VIDEO (DV) AUDIO DESCRIPTION (AD) description of progam’s key visual elements reading aloud of textual and graphic (e.g. settings, costumes, body language) information displayed on screen drama, documentary, children’s news, information programs 8
  9. 9. BROADCASTING REPRESENTATION & PORTRAYAL Equitable Portrayal Annual Code Progress Reports Corporate Plans corporate initiativesFAIR & EQUITABLE PORTRAYALOF PERSONS WITH DISABILTIES community programming outreach 9
  10. 10. TELECOMMUNICATIONS RELAY SERVICESTEXT BASED RELAY SERVICES Teletypewriter (TTY) Internet Protocol (IP) Relay Service Relay Service required since 1985 required since 2010Cost of TTY and IP Relay funded by all telephone subscribers 10
  11. 11. TELECOMMUNICATIONS RELAY SERVICES SIGN LANGUAGE BASED RELAY SERVICES – VIDEO RELAY SERVICE (VRS) Challenges:  high cost  two language markets (ASL & LSQ) Key priority for persons who communicate via sign languageAssessment of feasibility of VRS (costs, CRTC will decideprojected use, size of markets): whether to hold a • VRS trials in 3 Canadian cities proceeding on VRS in (Telus Communications Co.) 2012 • VRS feasibility study (Bell Canada) 11
  12. 12. TELECOMMUNICATIONS MOBILE WIRELESS SERVICESEvolution and popularity of wireless communications & applications 2012 mobile wireless handsets have become increasingly important as wireless communications needs 1980’s continue to expand and wireless mobile devices become the preferred web access device for many - what many would call a necessity of modern life 12
  13. 13. TELECOMMUNICATIONS MOBILE WIRELESS SERVICES Persons who are blindCanadian wireless Persons whoservice providers haveshould offer at moderate toleast one type severe mobilityof wireless device impairmentsthat is accessible to: Persons who have moderate to severe cognitive impairments 13
  14. 14. TELECOMMUNICATIONS MOBILE WIRELESS SERVICES • Accessible • Lack of • Industry-wide devices for integrated consultations persons with low supported out- with persons vision of-the-box with disabilities SOLUTIONS • Increased solutions to understandSUCESSES awareness of, GAPS • people who are user profiles and and activities to blind requirements address, the • persons with • Coordination needs and severe mobility among all solutions for or cognitive participants in persons with impairments the supply chain disabilities • Gaps in customer • Work with other service jurisdictions 14
  15. 15. TELECOMMUNICATIONS & BROADCASTING CUSTOMER SERVICE & INFORMATIONCRITICAL TO ASSIST PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES IN MAKING INFORMED CHOICES Accessible information on disability-specific services & products Bills and information Accessible websites on rates, terms and with general conditions of phone information on service in alternative services and products formats * * • Braille • large print • electronic version Free Directory Assistance for Accessible call persons with centres disabilities 15
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