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Skills & Ideas for
#ProblemGamblingKTE
Part of the OPGRC’s Moving Research Forward workshop series
questions?
get in touch
http://knowledgetoaction.ca
@anne_bergen
Reuse & Attribution
This work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Attribute this w...
Space
Matters
What Can & Can’t
Be Translated
Explicit
Knowledge
Tacit
Knowledge
Collaboration &
Knowledge Exchange
Introductions
key questions for KTE
1.  What research knowledge should be transferred?
2.  To whom should research knowledge be
transfer...
Audiences
& contexts
Actors
Influencers
Audiences
Policy Contexts
A
I
SOAR
Analysis
Who needs to know about your research?
Who can act on the knowledge or influence
others to act?
 
 
Strength...
Creative
Destruction
Facilitates
Innovation
Part 1
List everything we can do to
achieve the worst result
imaginable of KTE for problem
gambling research.
Be inventive...
Part 2
Which of the items on our list are we
already doing, in some form or
other? What is the impact?
Be candid.
Part 3
What can you and I do to help stop
this unwanted practice? What is
the first step? Who else is needed?
Be specific.
KTE Tools
& Communication
Channels
On Paper
book chapter
brochure
doorknocker
flyer
infographic
letter
logic model
journal article
magazine
newspaper
picture
...
On Screen
app
blog post
email
infographic
image
journal article
MOOC
podcast
pop-up message
social media
text message
webs...
Translating Through Video– Specific Audiences
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0Y0ew5yMo8
Social Media
Outcomes
•  Awareness raising
•  Engagement
•  Unanticipated
effects
à #ProblemGamblingKTE
In Person
conference
charrette
classroom
coffee break
conversation
elevator chat
focus group
gov jam
keynote address
kitch...
Stakeholder
Engagement
Increasing Levels of Public Impact
Inform Consult Involve Collaborate Empower
Decreasing Levels of Researcher Control
Adap...
KTE Throughout the Research Cycle
Develop
research
question
Design
methods
Project
manage
Interpret
results
Share
findings...
Campbell, S. (2012). Knowledge translation curriculum module 1: An introduction
to knowledge translation. Canadian Coaliti...
Understanding Your
Audience:
Personas
& User-Centered Design
Persona Development
1.  What is their job? Their level of seniority?
2.  What are their demographic details?
3.  What is a...
planning for
Feasible
Impactful
KTE
Target
Audience
Key Message Timing Desired
Outcome
KTE Activities
Channel	
   KTE
Activity	
  
Resources
Required	
  
Likely
Impact	
  
Evaluation	
  
In Person
On Screen
On Paper
KTE Stra...
Scenario Testing
Scenario Testing
1.  Who is the user and what is the KTE activity?
2.  Why will the user engage with the KTE activity?
a. ...
Plain Language
Writing
How will readers get the information?
Language Layout
Location
Plain Language Document Checklist
q written for the average reader
q organized to serve the reader’s needs
q uses quest...
•  a number of many
•  a sufficient amount of enough
•  at this point in time now
•  in order to to
•  carrying out ongoing...
•  UAFAAP - Use as few acronyms as possible.
– Make sure you define them first.
•  Use the same term for a concept throughou...
Formatting strategies
•  White space
– Short paragraphs
– Wide margins
– Padding around images
•  Headings
•  Bullets
•  T...
Plain Language Synopses
•  Research Questions
•  Purpose
•  Hypotheses
•  Participants
•  Procedure
•  Main Outcome Measur...
Recharging
Depleted
Self-Control
*physical activity, glucose, mindfulness, positive mood, &
not believing in limited self-...
10 Minute Break
Brief Message Practice
Memorable
Simple Easily Visualized
Environmental Triggers Chunks
Actionable
Simple Easily Visualized
Environmental Trigger...
Instructions: Pitch a KTE Strategy
(convince your advisor…or a funder…or a collaborator
that your approach is worthwhile)
...
W3
What?
So What?
Now What?
What?
What happened?
What did I observe?
What issues were addressed?
What stood out for me?
So What?
Why is that important? How did
my understanding change?
What was my emotional
reaction?
Now What?
How will my practice change:
…over the next 3 months?
…over the next year?
What systems-level changes
are needed?
Skills & ideas for #ProblemGamblingKTE
Skills & ideas for #ProblemGamblingKTE
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Skills & ideas for #ProblemGamblingKTE

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Skills & ideas for #ProblemGamblingKTE. (2104). Part of the "Moving Research Forward" Workshop Series for the Ontario Problem Gambling Research Centre.

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Skills & ideas for #ProblemGamblingKTE

  1. 1. Skills & Ideas for #ProblemGamblingKTE Part of the OPGRC’s Moving Research Forward workshop series
  2. 2. questions? get in touch http://knowledgetoaction.ca @anne_bergen
  3. 3. Reuse & Attribution This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Attribute this work as: Bergen, A. (2014). Skills & ideas for #ProblemGamblingKTE. Moving Research Forward Workshop Series, Ontario Problem Gambling Research Centre, Guelph ON. Thanks to Georgia Simms for her expertise in movement and arts-based learning. www.imageo.ca
  4. 4. Space Matters
  5. 5. What Can & Can’t Be Translated
  6. 6. Explicit Knowledge Tacit Knowledge
  7. 7. Collaboration & Knowledge Exchange
  8. 8. Introductions
  9. 9. key questions for KTE 1.  What research knowledge should be transferred? 2.  To whom should research knowledge be transferred? 3.  By whom should research knowledge be transferred? 4.  How should research knowledge be transferred? 5.  With what effect should research knowledge be transferred? Adapted from: Lavis, J. N., Robertson, D., Woodside, J. M., McLeod, C. B., & Abelson, J. (2003). How can research organizations more effectively transfer research knowledge to decision makers? Milbank Quarterly, 81(2), 221-248.
  10. 10. Audiences & contexts
  11. 11. Actors Influencers Audiences
  12. 12. Policy Contexts A I
  13. 13. SOAR Analysis Who needs to know about your research? Who can act on the knowledge or influence others to act?     Strengths What can we build on?   Opportunities What needs are unmet or changing?   Aspirations What future state do we want?   Results How will we know when we are succeeding?  
  14. 14. Creative Destruction Facilitates Innovation
  15. 15. Part 1 List everything we can do to achieve the worst result imaginable of KTE for problem gambling research. Be inventive. Adapted from http://www.liberatingstructures.com/
  16. 16. Part 2 Which of the items on our list are we already doing, in some form or other? What is the impact? Be candid.
  17. 17. Part 3 What can you and I do to help stop this unwanted practice? What is the first step? Who else is needed? Be specific.
  18. 18. KTE Tools & Communication Channels
  19. 19. On Paper book chapter brochure doorknocker flyer infographic letter logic model journal article magazine newspaper picture policy brief poster report sketch slideument
  20. 20. On Screen app blog post email infographic image journal article MOOC podcast pop-up message social media text message website webinar video
  21. 21. Translating Through Video– Specific Audiences https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0Y0ew5yMo8
  22. 22. Social Media Outcomes •  Awareness raising •  Engagement •  Unanticipated effects à #ProblemGamblingKTE
  23. 23. In Person conference charrette classroom coffee break conversation elevator chat focus group gov jam keynote address kitchen table discussion lunch & learn meeting public event townhall tradeshows workshop
  24. 24. Stakeholder Engagement
  25. 25. Increasing Levels of Public Impact Inform Consult Involve Collaborate Empower Decreasing Levels of Researcher Control Adapted from Arnstein’s (1969) Ladder of Public Participation and the IAP2 Spectrum of Public Participation Continuum of Stakeholder Engagement
  26. 26. KTE Throughout the Research Cycle Develop research question Design methods Project manage Interpret results Share findings Evaluate project success Connect with stakeholders Adapted from Shantz & Hitchman, 2012; Canadian Water Network (http://www.cwn-rce.ca/)
  27. 27. Campbell, S. (2012). Knowledge translation curriculum module 1: An introduction to knowledge translation. Canadian Coalition for Global Health Research (CCGHR). Retrieved from http://www.ccghr.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/ Module-1-KT-Curriculum.pdf
  28. 28. Understanding Your Audience: Personas & User-Centered Design
  29. 29. Persona Development 1.  What is their job? Their level of seniority? 2.  What are their demographic details? 3.  What is a typical day at their workplace? 4.  What are their goals? What do they value? 5.  What are their problems/ pain points (real or perceived)? 6.  Where and how do they seek information? 7.  What do they count as evidence? 8.  What kind of KTE experience do they want? 9.  What are their common barriers to evidence use? 10. What do you do that helps them solve their problems and reach their goals? Adapted from City of Guelph 2014 Health Jam (http://open.guelph.ca) and GovJam materials http://www.govjam.org/
  30. 30. planning for Feasible Impactful KTE
  31. 31. Target Audience Key Message Timing Desired Outcome KTE Activities
  32. 32. Channel   KTE Activity   Resources Required   Likely Impact   Evaluation   In Person On Screen On Paper KTE Strategies
  33. 33. Scenario Testing
  34. 34. Scenario Testing 1.  Who is the user and what is the KTE activity? 2.  Why will the user engage with the KTE activity? a.  What motivated them to first engage? b.  What are their expectations & goals? 3.  How will the user experience the KTE activity? Think about small tasks & behaviours. 4.  What does the KTE activity request/ require of the user? Is this a realistic request (timing/ resources/ social capital/ cognitive capacity/ political context)? 5.  How can the KTE activity help the user achieve their goals? What aspects of the KTE activity will be most/ least useful? 6.  How will the KTE activity impact the user’s attitudes/ intentions/ behaviours? 7.  How would this scenario change if it were a success story? If it were a story of failure or lessons learned? Adapted from City of Guelph 2014 Health Jam (http://open.guelph.ca) and GovJam materials http://www.govjam.org/
  35. 35. Plain Language Writing
  36. 36. How will readers get the information? Language Layout Location
  37. 37. Plain Language Document Checklist q written for the average reader q organized to serve the reader’s needs q uses question-and-answer format q use “you” and other pronouns q uses active voice q uses short sections and sentences q written to one person, not a group q uses the simplest tense possible q places words carefully (exceptions are last; subjects and verbs are together) q uses lists and tables q avoids confusing words q uses headings with no more than two or three sub-levels
  38. 38. •  a number of many •  a sufficient amount of enough •  at this point in time now •  in order to to •  carrying out ongoing research researching Remove extra words
  39. 39. •  UAFAAP - Use as few acronyms as possible. – Make sure you define them first. •  Use the same term for a concept throughout •  Make your document easy to navigate Be consistent and predictable
  40. 40. Formatting strategies •  White space – Short paragraphs – Wide margins – Padding around images •  Headings •  Bullets •  Tables & images (if they complement text)
  41. 41. Plain Language Synopses •  Research Questions •  Purpose •  Hypotheses •  Participants •  Procedure •  Main Outcome Measures •  Key Results •  Limitations •  Conclusions http://www.gamblingresearch.org/synopsis-project
  42. 42. Recharging Depleted Self-Control *physical activity, glucose, mindfulness, positive mood, & not believing in limited self-control might increase your willpower
  43. 43. 10 Minute Break
  44. 44. Brief Message Practice
  45. 45. Memorable Simple Easily Visualized Environmental Triggers Chunks Actionable Simple Easily Visualized Environmental Triggers Use Norms Specify When to Act (Ratner & Riis, 2014). http://www.pnas.org/content/111/Supplement_4/13634.full.pdf+html
  46. 46. Instructions: Pitch a KTE Strategy (convince your advisor…or a funder…or a collaborator that your approach is worthwhile) •  Your group has 15 minutes to create 3 brief messages about your KTE strategy –  title (if this is all someone reads…what will they learn) –  tweet (140 ch. w. link to richer content #hashtag) –  elevator pitch (60 seconds of verbal persuasion) •  At the end, hand in your title & tweet –  As you share your pitch with the group, your title & tweet will be on the screen –  We’ll consider the impact and feasibility of the proposed KTE strategies after each group’s pitch
  47. 47. W3 What? So What? Now What?
  48. 48. What? What happened? What did I observe? What issues were addressed? What stood out for me?
  49. 49. So What? Why is that important? How did my understanding change? What was my emotional reaction?
  50. 50. Now What? How will my practice change: …over the next 3 months? …over the next year? What systems-level changes are needed?

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