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Houston Sustainability Indicators 2012

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The Houston Sustainability Indicators Project is a long range project to assist with justifying, predicting, analyzing and offering normative guidance on achieving sustainable development in Houston. This research is led by Dr. Lester King of the Shell Center for Sustainability at Rice University.

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Houston Sustainability Indicators 2012

  1. 1. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators:A comprehensive development review for citizens, analysts and decision makersAuthor:Lester King, PhD, AICP, LEEDSustainability FellowShell Center for SustainabilityRICE UNIVERSITYLIKE us on Facebook.com/hsi.project(713) 703-8535 | LOK1@rice.edu | http://shellcenter.rice.edu
  2. 2. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 2 of 49Objectives1. Prioritize those issues thatwill most directly impact theregions future growth anddevelopment.2. Consider indicatorinterrelatedness and developa model that allows predictionof future trends and thatspecifies actions to be taken3. Show how GIS methodologiescan be used to enhance thetracking of the indicators andthe modeling efforts.4. EducationConsiderations Considerations
  3. 3. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 3 of 49Interdisciplinary – Consensus BuildingAdvisory Board – Rice UniversityJohn Anderson, PhDGeologistResearch in Geosciences for 40 yearsJim BlackburnEnvironmental LawyerEnvironmental Law for 30 yearsStephen Klineberg, PhDSociologistHouston Area Survey for 29 YearsLyn Ragsdale, PhDPolitical ScientistPolitical Science for 30 YearsRon Soligo, PhDEconomistEnergy Economics for 48 yearsExperts - City of HoustonSocial Development ExpertsMichael Emerson, PhD Rice UniversityPeter Brown Former City CouncilRobert Bullard, PhDTexas SouthernUniversityDavid Crossley Houston TomorrowMarlene GafrickCity of HoustonPlanning DirectorRocaille Roberts, PhDHealthy LivingMattersDiane SchenkeGreater East EndManagement DistrictLaura Solitare, PhDTexas SouthernUniversityEconomic Development ExpertsTheresa DeBose Centerpoint EnergyGavin Dillingham, PhD Houston Advanced ResearchGeorge Granias METRO, Chief ExecutiveCarol Lewis, PhD Texas Southern UniversityQisheng Pan, PhD Texas Southern UniversityLaura Spanjian Houston Sustainability DirectorFred WelchGreater Houston Partnership,VPEnvironmental Development ExpertsPhil Bedient, Ph.D. Rice UniversityJun ChangCity of Houston Public WorksDeputy DirectorThomas Colbert University of HoustonAston Hinds, Ph.D.Port of Houston EnvironmentalDirectorJim Lester, Ph.D. Houston Advanced ResearchBrandt Mannchen Sierra ClubMartin Melosi, Ph.D. University of HoustonJeff TaebelHouston Galveston AreaCouncilMatt Tejada, Ph.D. Air Alliance Houston
  4. 4. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 4 of 49Research Plan
  5. 5. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 5 of 49Indicator Framework – BIG Ideas and Choices of IndicatorsSocial Development Economic Development Environmental Development
  6. 6. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 6 of 49Consensus BuildingTargets CategoryAssignmentsGood TrendModerate TrendModerate Action NeededNegative TrendMajor Action NeededPolicies and Programs
  7. 7. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 7 of 49SOCIAL DEVELOPMENTTHEME – Social DemographySub Theme – Population GrowthIndicator – Population GrowthSub Theme – EducationIndicator – Education AttainmentSub Theme – CommunityInvolvementIndicator – Voter ParticipationTHEME – PovertySub Theme – InequalityIndicator – Income InequalitySub Theme – Poverty LevelIndicator – Poverty RateSub Theme – Healthcare DeliveryIndicator – Health CoverageTHEME – LivabilitySub Theme – Cost of LivingIndicator – AffordabilitySub Theme – Quality of LifeIndicator: Accessibility of PublicSpacesSub Theme – Health & NutritionIndicator – Food Deserts
  8. 8. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 8 of 49SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT - POLICYTHEME – Social DemographySub Theme – Population Growth: Indicator – Population Growth We need to encourage more population growth within the City through incentives todevelop in the city as opposed to the suburbs.Sub Theme – Education: Indicator – Education Attainment Major actions and interventions are needed to reduce education gap and disparitiesamong students of color and whites education/graduation rates and skills level. Structure k-12 to develop vocational tech training that provides blue collar jobs.Sub Theme – Community Involvement: Indicator – Voter Participation We need to strive to increase voting since it is a major cornerstone to any democracy. Elected officials need to find ways to demonstrate accountability to citizens, adoption ofa comprehensive sustainability indicators program will aid this goal.
  9. 9. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 9 of 49SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT - POLICYTHEME – PovertySub Theme – Inequality: Indicator – Income Inequality Improved skills and training needs to be developed to reduce income inequality. A local or state taxing structure to reduce income inequality would allow for systematicapproach to this issue.Sub Theme – Poverty Level: Indicator – Poverty Rate Need to establish a commission on the root causes of poverty which often link back tounderperforming schools, and inadequate job skills.Sub Theme – Healthcare Delivery: Indicator – Health Coverage Need to attract more jobs that offer healthcare and livable wages.
  10. 10. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 10 of 49SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT - POLICYTHEME – LivabilitySub Theme – Cost of Living: Indicator – Affordability Citizens in Houston pay more for transportation as a percentage of income than other citiesof comparable size. Improving transit options would help to alleviate this burden.Sub Theme – Quality of Life: Indicator – Accessibility of Public Spaces Houston needs to aggressively develop more parks and green space.Sub Theme – Health & Nutrition: Indicator – Food Deserts City of Houston needs to actively attract more grocery stores selling fresh fruits andvegetables across the city.
  11. 11. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 11 of 49ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENTTHEME – Economic DevelopmentSub Theme – EmploymentIndicator – Employment StatusSub Theme – Macroeconomic PerformanceIndicator – Primary Jobs and Green JobsSub Theme – EarningsIndicator – IncomeSub Theme – Waste Generation & ManagementIndicator – Waste GenerationSub Theme – Energy UseIndicator – Energy ConsumptionTHEME – TransportationSub Theme – AccessIndicator – Access to Public TransportationSub Theme – DemandIndicator – Vehicle Miles TraveledSub Theme – ModeIndicator – Travel Choice
  12. 12. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 12 of 49ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT - POLICYTHEME – Economic DevelopmentSub Theme – Employment: Indicator – Employment Status Need to match skills training from universities and colleges with demand from employers.Collaboration between universities, community colleges, school district, and majoremployers, with support from the city, is necessary. Develop apprenticeships programs. Utilize Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) training programs more effectively.Sub Theme – Macroeconomic Performance: Indicator – Primary Jobs/Green Jobs Develop alternative energy industry to attract high end jobs in that sector. Develop IT/ Advanced Technologies skills and knowledge labor force. Need to improve quality of life to attract professionals and jobs (eg. Arts, eco-tourism,attractions). Need to foster and grow Life Science and Bio-Technology industries in Houston.Sub Theme – Earnings: Indicator – Income Foster development of energy trading (Collaboration between Greater HoustonPartnership, Banks, and Universities). Develop our opportunity to increase international trade based on large diversity.
  13. 13. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 13 of 49ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT - POLICYTHEME – Economic DevelopmentSub Theme – Waste Generation and Management: Indicator – Waste Generation Reporting requirement for waste haulers to report sources of waste collected. We need to be more conscious about decreasing land fill space to work towards a greenand sustainable region. City of Houston needs to expand the household recycling program to all households.Charging a fee for regular stream waste disposal will offset the cost of this importantprogram.Sub Theme – Energy: Indicator – Energy Consumption We need to utilize energy efficient building technology such as smart energy meters. Educate and Incentivize residents on weatherization and energy conservation. Need to develop real time pricing policy since we have smart meter capability. Need energy disclosure policies and required audits for large users.
  14. 14. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 14 of 49ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT - POLICYTHEME – Economic DevelopmentSub Theme – Access: Indicator – Access to Transit Transit service improvements - Frequency, circulation services/linkages within strategicareas such as the job centers, and travel time need to be improved to circumventcongestion and long travel time. Transit accessibility improvements - Infrastructure such as ramps, sidewalks, bridges overditches, and sufficient amount of shelters need to be addressed as part of a complete tripspackage to make public transportation safe, feasible, and desirable. Transit coordination - We need coordination of public agencies to plan for improvingtransit (METRO, Houston Planning Department, Houston Public Works, HGAC, HISD. Transit Planning - Transit corridor ordinance has not been utilized effectively in Houston.Sub Theme – Demand: Indicator – Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) Incentivize housing development near employment areas. Flex Work program is not be effectively promoted and utilized.Sub Theme – Mode: Indicator – Travel Choice The pedestrian and bicycle network should be developed to complement the bus and railnetwork as the rail network cannot be as effective without the other modes. Develop technologies such as apps to coordinate transit options such as bus, rail, andride share programs.
  15. 15. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 15 of 49ENVIRONMENTAL DEVELOPMENTTHEME – AtmosphereSub Theme – Air QualityIndicator – Ambient PollutantsSub Theme – Climate ChangeIndicator – Greenhouse GasEmissionsTHEME – Fresh WaterSub Theme – Water QualityIndicator – Water PollutionSub Theme – Water DemandIndicator – Water UseSub Theme – Water ResourcesIndicator – Water AvailabilityTHEME – LandSub Theme – FloodingIndicator – Floodplain ExpansionSub Theme – Land CoverIndicator: Land Cover ChangeSub Theme – ClassificationIndicator – Jobs/Housing Balance
  16. 16. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 16 of 49SOCIAL DEVELOPMENTTHEME – Social DemographySub Theme – Population GrowthIndicator – Population GrowthSub Theme – EducationIndicator – Education AttainmentSub Theme – CommunityInvolvementIndicator – Voter ParticipationTHEME – PovertySub Theme – InequalityIndicator – Income InequalitySub Theme – Poverty LevelIndicator – Poverty RateSub Theme – Healthcare DeliveryIndicator – Health CoverageTHEME – LivabilitySub Theme – Cost of LivingIndicator – AffordabilitySub Theme – Quality of LifeIndicator: Accessibility of PublicSpacesSub Theme – Health & NutritionIndicator – Food Deserts
  17. 17. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 17 of 49SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT THEME – Social DemographySub Theme – Population GrowthIndicator – Population Growth2010 2030city 2,099,451 2,884,575county 4,092,459 5,500,549Sub Theme – EducationIndicator – Education Attainment4YearcompletionrateHISDHISDENROLL TexasAll 74.3% 202,773 80.6%White 87.9% 15,889 89.7%Black 73.7% 53,680 73.8%Hispanic 70.7% 125,097 73.5%Sub Theme – Community InvolvementIndicator – Voter Participation43% - 2000 . 34% - 20101,630,5531,953,6312,099,4512,560,9502,668,8252,884,5750500,0001,000,0001,500,0002,000,0002,500,0003,000,0003,500,000199019911992199319941995199619971998199920002001200220032004200520062007200820092010201520202030Source: US Census Bureau, Intercensal totals and projection calculated by Lester King, PhDCity of HoustonPopulation Count2,818,1993,400,5784,092,4594,585,7144,890,6595,500,54901,000,0002,000,0003,000,0004,000,0005,000,0006,000,000199019911992199319941995199619971998199920002001200220032004200520062007200820092010201520202030Source: US Census BureauHarris County PopulationCount0.221.810.721.421.670.000.200.400.600.801.001.201.401.601.802.00Source: US Census Bureau, Calculationby LesterKing, PhD.City of HoustonAverage Annual Growth1.571.88 1.852.052.1900.511.522.51980 -1990 1990 -2000 2000 -2010 2010 -2020 2020 -2030Source: US Census Bureau, Calculation by Lester King,PhD.Harris County Average Annual Growth0500,0001,000,0001,500,0002,000,0002,500,0001980199020002010PopulationSource: US CensusCity of Houston Race andEthnicityTotal PopulationWhiteHispanicAfrican-AmericanOther0500,0001,000,0001,500,0002,000,0002,500,0003,000,0003,500,0004,000,0004,500,00019901992199419961998200020022004200620082010PopulationSource: US Census BureauHarris County Race andEthnicityTotal PopWhiteHispanicAfrican-AmericanOther
  18. 18. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 18 of 49SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT THEME – Social DemographySub Theme – Population GrowthIndicator – Population GrowthAverage Annual Growth Rate1990-2000 2000-2010 2010-202029,476 14,063 29,812Sub Theme – EducationIndicator – Education Attainment4YearcompletionrateHISDHISDENROLL TexasAll 74.3% 202,773 80.6%White 87.9% 15,889 89.7%Black 73.7% 53,680 73.8%Hispanic 70.7% 125,097 73.5%Sub Theme – Community InvolvementIndicator – Voter Participation43% - 2000 . 34% - 20100.221.810.721.421.670.000.200.400.600.801.001.201.401.601.802.00Source: US Census Bureau, Calculationby LesterKing, PhD.City of HoustonAverage Annual Growth
  19. 19. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 19 of 49SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT THEME – Social DemographySub Theme – Population GrowthIndicator – Population GrowthRace/Ethnicity 2010 Houston HarrisWhite 25.6% 33%Black 23.1% 18.4%Hispanic 43.8% 40.8%Other 7.4% 7.7%Sub Theme – EducationIndicator – Education Attainment4YearcompletionrateHISDHISDENROLL TexasAll 74.3% 202,773 80.6%White 87.9% 15,889 89.7%Black 73.7% 53,680 73.8%Hispanic 70.7% 125,097 73.5%Sub Theme – Community InvolvementIndicator – Voter Participation43% - 2000 . 34% - 20100500,0001,000,0001,500,0002,000,0002,500,0001980199020002010PopulationSource: US CensusCity of Houston Race andEthnicityTotal PopulationWhiteHispanicAfrican-AmericanOther0500,0001,000,0001,500,0002,000,0002,500,0003,000,0003,500,0004,000,0004,500,00019901992199419961998200020022004200620082010PopulationSource: US Census BureauHarris County Race andEthnicityTotal PopWhiteHispanicAfrican-AmericanOther
  20. 20. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 20 of 49SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT THEME – Social DemographySub Theme – Population GrowthIndicator – Population GrowthAverage Annual Growth Rate1990-2000 2000-2010 2010-202029,476 14,063 29,812Sub Theme – EducationIndicator – Education Attainment4YearcompletionrateHISDHISDENROLL TexasAll 74.3% 202,773 80.6%White 87.9% 15,889 89.7%Black 73.7% 53,680 73.8%Hispanic 70.7% 125,097 73.5%Sub Theme – Community InvolvementIndicator – Voter Participation43% - 2000 . 34% - 2010
  21. 21. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 21 of 49SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT THEME – Social Demography Indicator – Population Growth
  22. 22. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 22 of 49SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT THEME – PovertySub Theme – InequalityIndicator – Income InequalityMedian Income2000 2010T0P20% $144,476 $140,689Median $36,866 $43,295Bottom20% $8,619 $10,415Sub Theme – Poverty LevelIndicator – Poverty RateLiving in Poverty1990 2000 201021% 19% 23%Sub Theme – Healthcare DeliveryIndicator – Health CoverageUninsuredHouston Harris646,313 1,141,78831% 28%2000Harris (a)2010Harris (b)2010Houston (b)Insured 2,754,239 2,946,305 1,445,921Uninsured 676,637 1,141,788 646,313% 19.7% 27.9% 30.9%Source:a – US Census Bureau, 2000 Small Area Health Insurance Estimatesb – US Census Bureau010,00020,00030,00040,00050,00060,00070,00080,00090,000100,000110,000120,000130,000140,000150,000160,0001990 2000 2010DollarsSource: US Census, Calculation by AuthorCity of Houston Median Household IncomeComparison between Top and Bottom 20%Median Top 20%MedianMedian Bottom 20%13.0116.7613.510246810121416181990 2000 2010RatioSource: US Census Bureau, Calculationby LesterKing, PhD.Ratio of Share in IncomeBetween the Top and Bottom 20%Ratio of Share in Income20.719.222.8 22.5 23.0240.05.010.015.020.025.030.01990 2000 2010 2015 2020 2030Source: US CensusPecent Below Poverty
  23. 23. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 23 of 49SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT THEME – LivabilitySub Theme – Cost of LivingIndicator – AffordabilityHousingcost%IncomeHousing &Transportationcost %IncomeHouston 23% -26th 46% -26thNew York 25% -39th 37% -3rdChicago 25% -42nd 42% -14thLosAngeles 31% -58th 51% -51stSource: Center for Neighborhood Technology 2011Sub Theme – Quality of LifeIndicator: Accessibility of PublicSpaces30%620,000Population living ¼ milefrom city park 2010Sub Theme – Health & NutritionIndicator – Food Deserts36%750,000Population living>1 mile from Grocery0.001.002.003.004.005.006.0019901991199219931994199519961997199819992000200120022003200420052006200720082009201020112012201520202030Cost($)Source: US Department ofLabor, BLS, Calculation by Lester King,PhD.Gasoline / galHoustonUS Average19.81 20.3329.55051015202530354045501990 2000 2010PercentageSource: US Census Bureau, Calculationby LesterKing, PhD.Percent of Housing Units costing > 30% Income of Tenants143,42831,06720,21312,28336,63348,916172,85935,46522,44013,98446,11260,096171,10844,80528,41121,36882,772104,140050,000100,000150,000200,000< 20% 20 to 24percent25 to 29percent30 to 34percent> 35% > 30%HousingUnitsPercentage of IncomeSource: US Census Bureau, Calculationby LesterKing, PhD.Housing Units by Percentage of Income1990200020100510152025199019911992199319941995199619971998199920002001200220032004200520062007200820092010Source: Bureau of LaborStatistics; TexasA&MReal Estate Center; Calculation byLester King, PhD.Houston MedianHome Price vs Gasoline priceMedHomePrice($0000)MedianGas/Gal(scale)
  24. 24. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 24 of 49SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT THEME – LivabilitySub Theme – Cost of LivingIndicator – Affordability%Housing units costing >30%of Income1990 2000 201020% 20% 30%Sub Theme – Quality of LifeIndicator: Accessibility of PublicSpaces30%620,000Population living ¼ milefrom city park 2010Sub Theme – Health & NutritionIndicator – Food Deserts36%750,000Population living>1 mile from Grocery0510152025199019911992199319941995199619971998199920002001200220032004200520062007200820092010Source: Bureau of LaborStatistics; TexasA&MReal Estate Center; Calculation byLester King, PhD.Houston MedianHome Price vs Gasoline priceMedHomePrice($0000)MedianGas/Gal(scale)
  25. 25. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 25 of 49SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT THEME – Livability
  26. 26. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 26 of 49ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENTTHEME – Economic DevelopmentSub Theme – EmploymentIndicator – Employment StatusSub Theme – Macroeconomic PerformanceIndicator – Primary Jobs and Green JobsSub Theme – EarningsIndicator – IncomeSub Theme – Waste Generation & ManagementIndicator – Waste GenerationSub Theme – Energy UseIndicator – Energy ConsumptionTHEME – TransportationSub Theme – AccessIndicator – Access to Public TransportationSub Theme – DemandIndicator – Vehicle Miles TraveledSub Theme – ModeIndicator – Travel Choice
  27. 27. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 27 of 49ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT THEME – Economic DevelopmentSub Theme – EmploymentIndicator – Employment StatusUnemploymentRate 2010White Black Hispanic10% 6.2% 16.5% 9.5%Sub Theme – Macroeconomic PerformanceIndicator – Primary Jobs and Green Jobs<7% Jobs inHouston areGreen%Primary Jobs1990 2000 201022% 18% 23%Sub Theme – EarningsIndicator – IncomePerCapitaIncome1990 2000 201020,108 34,180 44,001Sub Theme – Waste Generation &ManagementIndicator – Waste Generation6.5lbs/person/day – Disposal RateSub Theme – Energy UseIndicator – Energy Consumption18.7 MWh – Electricity Use14.711.4916.59.39.049.55.054.166.28.187.57100246810121416181990 2000 2010RateSource: US Census BureauUnemployment RateAfrican-AmericanHispanicWhiteTotal517,3311,472,3321,545,3901,949,3972,206,4122,720,4423,234,47286,064170,697143,300214,340244,960306,200367,44029,245101,506172,515292,905328,722400,357471,9920500,0001,000,0001,500,0002,000,0002,500,0003,000,0003,500,0001990 2000 2010 2015 2020 2030 2040JobsSource: 1990, 2000, 2010 - CTPP, 2010 health HGAC, after 2010 calculation by Lester King, PhDHouston Jobs 1990 - 2040TotalJobsManufacturingHealth20,10834,18042,98444,87248,74144,00153,77460,79774,84210,00020,00030,00040,00050,00060,00070,00080,000199019911992199319941995199619971998199920002001200220032004200520062007200820092010201520202030Income($)Source: U.S. Dept ofCommerce, BEAPer capitaIncome Houston SugarLandBaytown MSA11.178.936.490.002.004.006.008.0010.0012.001990 2000 2010%Source: TCEQ, Calculation by Lester King,PhD.DisposalRate (lbs/person/day)Disposal Rate (lbs/person/day)02,000,0004,000,0006,000,0008,000,00010,000,00012,000,000Total ResidentialHouston(Mwh)Total HISD (Mwh) Total City Administration(Mwh)MwhSource: Centerpoint Energy 2011Annual Report; HISD Energy Report 2011; EPA 2010HoustonResidential Energy Demandvs CityAdministrationandHISD20002010
  28. 28. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 28 of 49ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT THEME – Economic DevelopmentSub Theme – EmploymentIndicator – Employment StatusUnemploymentRate 2010White Black Hispanic10% 6.2% 16.5% 9.5%Sub Theme – Macroeconomic PerformanceIndicator – Primary Jobs and Green Jobs<7% Jobs inHouston areGreen%Primary Jobs1990 2000 201022% 18% 23%Sub Theme – EarningsIndicator – IncomePerCapitaIncome1990 2000 201020,108 34,180 44,001Sub Theme – Waste Generation &ManagementIndicator – Waste Generation6.5lbs/person/day – Disposal RateSub Theme – Energy UseIndicator – Energy Consumption18.7 MWh – Electricity Use14.711.4916.59.39.049.55.054.166.28.187.57100246810121416181990 2000 2010RateSource: US Census BureauUnemployment RateAfrican-AmericanHispanicWhiteTotal
  29. 29. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 29 of 49ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT THEME – Economic DevelopmentSub Theme – EmploymentIndicator – Employment StatusUnemploymentRate 2010White Black Hispanic10% 6.2% 16.5% 9.5%Sub Theme – Macroeconomic PerformanceIndicator – Primary Jobs and Green Jobs<7% Jobs inHouston areGreen%Primary Jobs1990 2000 201022% 18% 23%Sub Theme – EarningsIndicator – IncomePerCapitaIncome1990 2000 201020,108 34,180 44,001Sub Theme – Waste Generation &ManagementIndicator – Waste Generation6.5lbs/person/day – Disposal RateSub Theme – Energy UseIndicator – Energy Consumption18.7 MWh – Electricity Use517,3311,472,3321,545,3901,949,3972,206,4122,720,4423,234,47286,064170,697143,300214,340244,960306,200367,44029,245101,506172,515292,905328,722400,357471,9920500,0001,000,0001,500,0002,000,0002,500,0003,000,0003,500,0001990 2000 2010 2015 2020 2030 2040JobsSource: 1990, 2000, 2010 - CTPP, 2010 health HGAC, after 2010 calculation by Lester King, PhDHouston Jobs 1990 - 2040TotalJobsManufacturingHealth
  30. 30. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 30 of 49ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT THEME – Economic DevelopmentSub Theme – EmploymentIndicator – Employment StatusUnemploymentRate 2010White Black Hispanic10% 6.2% 16.5% 9.5%Sub Theme – Macroeconomic PerformanceIndicator – Primary Jobs and Green Jobs<7% Jobs inHouston areGreen%Primary Jobs1990 2000 201022% 18% 23%Sub Theme – EarningsIndicator – IncomePerCapitaIncome1990 2000 201020,108 34,180 44,001Sub Theme – Waste Generation &ManagementIndicator – Waste Generation6.5lbs/person/day – Disposal RateSub Theme – Energy UseIndicator – Energy Consumption18.7 MWh – Electricity Use
  31. 31. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 31 of 49ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT THEME – Economic DevelopmentSub Theme – EmploymentIndicator – Employment StatusUnemploymentRate 2010White Black Hispanic10% 6.2% 16.5% 9.5%Sub Theme – Macroeconomic PerformanceIndicator – Primary Jobs and Green Jobs<7% Jobs inHouston areGreen%Primary Jobs1990 2000 201022% 18% 23%Sub Theme – EarningsIndicator – IncomePerCapitaIncome1990 2000 201020,108 34,180 44,001Sub Theme – Waste Generation &ManagementIndicator – Waste Generation6.5lbs/person/day – Disposal RateSub Theme – Energy UseIndicator – Energy Consumption18.7 MWh – Electricity Use02,000,0004,000,0006,000,0008,000,00010,000,00012,000,000Total ResidentialHouston(Mwh)Total HISD (Mwh) Total City Administration(Mwh)MwhSource: Centerpoint Energy 2011Annual Report; HISD Energy Report 2011; EPA 2010HoustonResidential Energy Demandvs CityAdministrationandHISD20002010
  32. 32. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 32 of 49ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT THEME – TransportationSub Theme – AccessIndicator – Access to PublicTransportation93% pop – ¼ mile to Bus StopSub Theme – DemandIndicator – Vehicle Miles TraveledAnnual VMT/Capita1990 2000 20106,605 8,560 8,497Sub Theme – ModeIndicator – Travel ChoiceAlternative to Private auto1990 2000 201028% 28% 25%50 489301020304050607080901001990 2000 2010PercentageSource: Houston METRO, Calculation by Lester King,PhD.Accessto TransitAccess to Transit6,6058,560 8,4979,3069,77910,72502,0004,0006,0008,00010,00012,0001990 2000 2010 2015 2020 2030MilesSource: TTI, Calculationby Lester King, PhD.Annual VMT PerCapita28.33 28.224.63 24.27523.3521.50510152025301990 2000 2010 2015 2020 2030PercentageSource: US Census BureauAlternativeTravel
  33. 33. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 33 of 49ENVIRONMENTAL DEVELOPMENTTHEME – AtmosphereSub Theme – Air QualityIndicator – Ambient PollutantsSub Theme – Climate ChangeIndicator – Greenhouse GasEmissionsTHEME – Fresh WaterSub Theme – Water QualityIndicator – Water PollutionSub Theme – Water DemandIndicator – Water UseSub Theme – Water ResourcesIndicator – Water AvailabilityTHEME – LandSub Theme – FloodingIndicator – Floodplain ExpansionSub Theme – Land CoverIndicator: Land Cover ChangeSub Theme – ClassificationIndicator – Jobs/Housing Balance
  34. 34. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 34 of 49ENVIRONMENTAL DEVELOPMENT THEME – AtmosphereSub Theme – Air QualityIndicator – Ambient PollutantsAnnual VMT/CapitaOzone PM2.5Standard 0.075ppm 0.079ppmHGB 15 μg/m3 11.7μg/m3Sub Theme – Climate ChangeIndicator – Greenhouse GasEmissionsCO2– 78,619,538tons 2008Harris County – #2 Emittingcounty in the country (LA#1)05,000,00010,000,00015,000,00020,000,00025,000,00030,000,00035,000,00040,000,00045,000,000Houston MSA CO2 Emissions2008 (Tons)NonroadAirborneAirportCementOnroadElec ProdResidentialIndustrialCommercial05,000,00010,000,00015,000,00020,000,00025,000,00030,000,00035,000,00040,000,00045,000,00050,000,000Harris County CO2 Emissions 2000 - 2008 (Tons)2000 Harris2008 Harris00.020.040.060.080.10.120.140.16199019911992199319941995199619971998199920002001200220032004200520062007200820092010Concentration,ppmOzone Levels in HGBSite1Site2Site3Site4Site5Site6Site7StandardTrend02468101214161820002001200220032004200520062007200820092010Concentration,μg/m3PM2.5 Trend HGBSite1Site2Site3StandardTrend
  35. 35. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 35 of 49ENVIRONMENTAL DEVELOPMENT THEME – AtmosphereSub Theme – Air QualityIndicator – Ambient PollutantsAnnual VMT/CapitaOzone PM2.5Standard 0.075ppm 0.079ppmHGB 15 μg/m3 11.7μg/m3Sub Theme – Climate ChangeIndicator – Greenhouse GasEmissionsCO2– 78,619,538tons 2000Harris County – #2 Emittingcounty in the country (LA#1)05,000,00010,000,00015,000,00020,000,00025,000,00030,000,00035,000,00040,000,00045,000,00050,000,000Harris County CO2 Emissions 2000 - 2008 (Tons)2000 Harris2008 Harris
  36. 36. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 36 of 49ENVIRONMENTAL DEVELOPMENT THEME – Fresh WaterSub Theme – Water QualityIndicator – Water PollutionCompliance - Meets all knownfederal drinking water qualitystandardsSub Theme – Water DemandIndicator – Water Use165Gal/Person/Day389,082acre/feet water usedSub Theme – Water ResourcesIndicator – Water Availability1.8billion acre-feet –Houston access rights300acre-feet – Houstondedicated to GalvestonBay0123456Source: CityofHouston Annual Drinking WaterQuality Reports 2000, 2010City of Houston Drinking Water Quality2000 - 2010200020102812552472292212152092031571591651391391391401410501001502002503001990 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050 2060GPCDSource: Texas Water Development Board; Calculation by Lester King, PhD.Harris County vs Houston PerCapita Municipal WaterDemand (GPCD)HarrisHouston0200,000400,000600,000800,0001,000,0001,200,0001990 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050 2060AcreFeetHarris County and Houston Municipal Water DemandSource: Texas Water Development BoardHarris minus HoustonHouston3,747,1693,083,3992,925,9352,992,4791,306,5621,264,2311,203,5281,254,628403,200379,500403,200164,061137,475137,475137,4750500,0001,000,0001,500,0002,000,0002,500,0003,000,0003,500,0004,000,0002000 2010 2030 2060Supplies(acre-feet/year)Source: Region H - RegionalWater Plans 2006, 2011Available Water Supply in Region H by LargestWholesale ProvidersTotalCity of HoustonTrinity River AuthoritySan Jacinto RiverAuthorityGulf Coast Water AuthorityBrazos River AuthorityDow Chemical
  37. 37. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 37 of 49ENVIRONMENTAL DEVELOPMENT THEME – LandSub Theme – FloodingIndicator – FloodplainExpansion25.5% - Houston in Floodplain148,853 – Housing units inFloodplain$18.5billion – Housingdamage riskSub Theme – Land CoverIndicator: Land Cover Change78% - Urbanized16% - High Intensity Development46% - Medium-low IntensityDevelopmentSub Theme – ClassificationIndicator – Jobs/HousingBalance17 – Business centers57% - Jobs in Business centers22%pop – living ¼ mile fromBusiness center
  38. 38. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 38 of 49ENVIRONMENTAL DEVELOPMENT THEME – LandSub Theme – FloodingIndicator – FloodplainExpansion25.5% - Houston in Floodplain148,853 – Housing units inFloodplain$18.5billion – Housingdamage riskSub Theme – Land CoverIndicator: Land Cover Change78% - Urbanized16% - High Intensity Development46% - Medium-low IntensityDevelopmentSub Theme – ClassificationIndicator – Jobs/HousingBalance17 – Business centers57% - Jobs in Business centers22%pop – living ¼ mile fromBusiness center
  39. 39. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 39 of 49ENVIRONMENTAL DEVELOPMENT THEME – LandSub Theme – FloodingIndicator – FloodplainExpansion25.5% - Houston in Floodplain148,853 – Housing units inFloodplain$18.5billion – Housingdamage riskSub Theme – Land CoverIndicator: Land Cover Change78% - Urbanized16% - High Intensity Development46% - Medium-low IntensityDevelopmentSub Theme – ClassificationIndicator – Jobs/HousingBalance17 – Business centers57% - Jobs in Business centers22%pop – living ¼ mile fromBusiness center
  40. 40. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 40 of 49ENVIRONMENTAL DEVELOPMENT THEME – LandSub Theme – FloodingIndicator – FloodplainExpansion25.5% - Houston in Floodplain148,853 – Housing units inFloodplain$18.5billion – Housingdamage riskSub Theme – Land CoverIndicator: Land Cover Change78% - Urbanized16% - High Intensity Development46% - Medium-low IntensityDevelopmentSub Theme – ClassificationIndicator – Jobs/HousingBalance17 – Business centers57% - Jobs in Business centers22%pop – living ¼ mile fromBusiness center
  41. 41. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 41 of 49NEXT STEPS Public Presentation Policy and Program Recommendations National Comparison Neighborhood Comparison
  42. 42. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 48 of 49Conclusion How to take big data on the city and systematically develop knowledge and understandingof development. The research also shows how the precepts of sustainable development can enhanceunderstanding of development. Relationships in urban development measures can becombined in a systematic format under the rubric of sustainability. How to target investment for many of the various functions of government and systems inthe urban area. How systems are interrelated and how those interrelations have impacts onneighborhoods. How to categorize and compare various areas in the city. Separating areas by populationsize or income is a socio-economic historical approach to managing the complexity of thecity. The research procedure offers a much more efficient and systematic procedure.
  43. 43. Houston Sustainable Development Indicators 2012Page 49 of 49THANK YOUHouston Sustainable Development Indicators:A comprehensive development review for citizens, analysts and decision makersLester King, PhD, AICP, LEEDSustainability Fellow(713) 703-8535 | LOK1@rice.edu | http://www.facebook.com/hsi.projectFind the Houston Sustainability Indicators Project http://shellcenter.rice.edu

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