AP 7181 Access PointProduct Reference Guide                Version 1.0.0.F               October 20, 2010
AP 7181 Access PointProduct Reference Guide
ContentsChapter 1. IntroductionDocument Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...
iv   AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide              KeyGuard Encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....
v      MU Association Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-23      Operating Mode...
vi   AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide                   Preparing the AP 7181 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...
vii   Configuring VLAN Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5   Configuring LAN1 and ...
viii   AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide            Configuring 802.1x EAP Authentication . . . . . . . . . . ....
ix   Viewing Radio Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-22        Retry Histog...
x   AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide       Appendix D. Managing AP 7181 Networks with Wireless Manager       D...
xi        5 GHz ADEPT Antenna Setting Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-48MeshConnex Security Configuration. . . ...
xii   AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide
1                                                                    IntroductionAs a standalone access point, the AP 7181...
1-2 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide   1.1 Document Conventions   The following graphical alerts are used in t...
Introduction   1-31.2 Feature OverviewAn AP 7181 access point supports the following feature set:    •   Mesh Networking  ...
1-4 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide       •    Auto Negotiation       •    Rogue AP Enhancements       •    B...
Introduction   1-5added to or removed from the network. Spanning Tree Mesh Networking is designed forsmaller-scale indoor ...
1-6 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide   1.2.4 Multiple Mounting Options   The AP 7181 can attach to a wall, pol...
Introduction   1-7BSSID #1             00:A0:F8:72:20:D0              Same as Radio MAC addressBSSID #2             00:A0:...
1-8 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide       •    KeyGuard Encryption       •    Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) Us...
Introduction   1-9network. Using EAP, authentication between devices is achieved through the exchange andverification of c...
1-10 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide    data without the appropriate key. Only the sender and receiver of the...
Introduction   1-111.2.9.6 WPA2-CCMP (802.11i) EncryptionWPA2 is a newer 802.11i standard that provides even stronger wire...
1-12 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide    the public network, it needs several layers of security. The access p...
Introduction   1-13    •   MIB (Management Information Base)    •   Command Line Interface (CLI) accessed via the RJ-45 po...
1-14 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide    1.2.14 MU-MU Transmission Disallow    The access point’s MU-MU Disall...
Introduction   1-151.2.17 Statistical DisplaysThe access point can display robust transmit and receive statistics for the ...
1-16 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide    For detailed information on importing or exporting configuration file...
Introduction   1-171.2.23 Multi-Function LEDsSix LEDs located on the bottom of the AP 7181 illuminate to indicate various ...
1-18 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide    For detailed information on configuring the access point for AAA RADI...
Introduction   1-191.2.30 Dynamic DNSThe access point supports the Dynamic DNS service. Dynamic DNS (or DynDNS) is afeatur...
1-20 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide    Authentication requests for users belonging to the group are honored ...
Introduction   1-21encoded Media Access Control (MAC) or IEEE addresses. MAC addresses determine thedevice sending or rece...
1-22 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide    The user can configure the ESSID to correspond to up to 16 WLANs on e...
Introduction   1-23system, each cell can operates independently. Adding cells to the network provides anincreased coverage...
1-24 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide        •    Signal strength between the Access Point and MU        •    ...
Introduction   1-25The scanning and association process continues for active MUs. This process allows MUsto find new acces...
1-26 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide    1.3.7 Management Access Options    Managing the access point includes...
Introduction   1-271.3.8 AP 7181 MAC Address AssignmentFor an AP 7181 model access point, MAC address assignments are as f...
1-28 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide
2                                        Hardware InstallationAn AP 7181 access point installation includes mounting the a...
2-2   AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide          •   Field Installation          •   Remote Panel Antenna Insta...
Hardware Installation   2-3   •   Do not hold any component containing a radio such that the antenna is very close       t...
2-4    AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide      2.3 Installation Methodology      Consideration of the order in w...
Hardware Installation   2-52.4.1 Ethernet and Lightning ProtectionWhen installing an AP 7181 Root Node that has a direct c...
2-6   AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide                   NOTE Lightning damage is not covered under the condit...
Hardware Installation   2-7Access points mounted on a metallic pole should be grounded as shown in the followingfigure.
2-8   AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide      Access points mounted on a nonmetallic pole should be grounded as ...
Hardware Installation   2-92.5 Minimum Installation RequirementsThe minimum requirements for installing an AP 7181:    •  ...
2-10   AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide       2.7.2 Root Node Placement       When planning for Root Node plac...
Hardware Installation   2-11        • The AP 7181 is rated for wind loading of up to160 miles per hour and 30 pounds      ...
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Ap7181 product referenceguide

  1. 1. AP 7181 Access PointProduct Reference Guide Version 1.0.0.F October 20, 2010
  2. 2. AP 7181 Access PointProduct Reference Guide
  3. 3. ContentsChapter 1. IntroductionDocument Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2Feature Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 Mesh Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4 Meshconnex Mesh Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4 Spanning Tree Mesh Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4 802.11n Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 Separate LAN and WAN Ports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 Multiple Mounting Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6 Antenna Support for 2.4 GHz and 5.x GHz Radios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6 Sixteen Configurable WLANs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6 Support for 4 BSSIDs per Radio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6 Quality of Service (QoS) Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7 Industry Leading Data Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7 Kerberos Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8 EAP Authentication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8 WEP Encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-9
  4. 4. iv AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide KeyGuard Encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-10 Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) Using TKIP Encryption . . . . . 1-10 WPA2-CCMP (802.11i) Encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-11 Firewall Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-11 VPN Tunnels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-11 Content Filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-12 VLAN Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-12 Multiple Management Accessibility Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-12 Updatable Firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-13 Programmable SNMP v1/v2/v3 Trap Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-13 MU-MU Transmission Disallow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-14 Voice Prioritization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-14 Support for CAM and PSP MUs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-14 Statistical Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-15 Transmit Power Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-15 Advanced Event Logging Capability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-15 Configuration File Import/Export Functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-15 Factory Default Configuration Restoration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-16 DHCP Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-16 Multi-Function LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-17 Mesh Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-17 Additional LAN Subnet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-17 On-board RADIUS Server Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-17 Hotspot Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-18 Routing Information Protocol (RIP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-18 Manual Date and Time Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-18 Dynamic DNS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-19 Auto Negotiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-19 Rogue AP Enhancements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-19 Bandwidth Management Enhancements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-19 RADIUS Time-Based Authentication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-19 QBSS Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-20 Theory of Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-20 Wireless Coverage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-21 MAC Layer Bridging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-22 Media Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-22 Direct-Sequence Spread Spectrum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-23
  5. 5. v MU Association Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-23 Operating Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-25 Management Access Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-26 AP 7181 MAC Address Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-27Chapter 2.Hardware InstallationPrecautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2Deployment Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3Installation Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4Grounding Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4 Ethernet and Lightning Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5 AP 7181 Grounding Hardware and Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6Minimum Installation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9Package Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9Access Point Placement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9 Site Surveys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9 Root Node Placement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10 Non Root Node Placement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10 Mounting Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11 Device Deployment Height. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12Antenna Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12AP 7181 Power Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12 Power Cables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13Mounting an AP 7181 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14 Pole Mounted Installations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14Installing an AP 7181 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15 Required Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15 AP 7181 Connections and Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16 LED Status Indicator Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-19 External Hardware Reset. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-19 Removing the AP 7181 Kit from the Shipping Carton . . . . . . . . . . . 2-21 Staging the Device Prior to Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-23Field Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-31 Bottom Mount Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-32 Top Mount Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-40Remote Panel Antenna Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-49
  6. 6. vi AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide Preparing the AP 7181 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-52 Installing the Remote Panel Antenna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-54 Installing the Blank Antenna Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-57 Chapter 3. Getting Started Initially Connecting to the Access Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2 Connecting to the Access Point Using the WAN Port . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3 Connecting to the Access Point Using the LAN Port. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4 Basic Device Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6 Configuring Device Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8 Configuring WLAN Security Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16 Creating a Secure Recovery WLAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-18 Testing Connectivity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-24 Creating a Mesh Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-25 Chapter 4. System Configuration Configuring System Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3 Configuring Geographic Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7 Configuring Data Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8 Managing Certificate Authority (CA) Certificates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14 Importing a CA Certificate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14 Creating Self Certificates for Accessing the VPN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-16 Creating a Certificate for Onboard RADIUS Authentication . . . . . 4-19 Configuring SNMP Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-23 Configuring SNMP Access Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-31 Enabling SNMP Traps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-32 Configuring Specific SNMP Traps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-35 Configuring SNMP RF Trap Thresholds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38 Configuring Network Time Protocol (NTP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-41 Logging Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-45 Importing/Exporting Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-48 Updating Device Firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-52 Chapter 5. Network Management Configuring the LAN Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
  7. 7. vii Configuring VLAN Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5 Configuring LAN1 and LAN2 Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10 Configuring Advanced DHCP Server Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-13 Setting the Type Filter Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15Configuring WAN Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-17 Configuring Network Address Translation (NAT) Settings. . . . . . . 5-23 Configuring Port Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-25 Configuring Dynamic DNS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-27Enabling Wireless LANs (WLANs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-29 Creating/Editing Individual WLANs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-32 Configuring WLAN Security Policies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-37 Configuring a WLAN Access Control List (ACL) . . . . . . . . . . 5-39 Setting the WLAN Quality of Service (QoS) Policy. . . . . . . . . 5-42 Configuring WLAN Hotspot Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-49 Setting the WLAN’s Radio Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-55 Configuring the 802.11a/n or 802.11b/g/n Radio . . . . . . . . . . . 5-60 Configuring Bandwidth Management Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-76Configuring MeshConnex Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-80 Mesh Points. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-80 Root Path Selection Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-81 Mesh Proxies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-82 Mesh Beacon Formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-82 Configuring MeshConnex Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-83 Configuring MeshConnex for Compatibility with Duo Devices . . . 5-87 Mesh Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-88 Static Proxy Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-91 Automatic Channel Scan Trigger Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-92Configuring Router Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-93 Setting the RIP Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-95Chapter 6. Configuring Access Point SecurityConfiguring Security Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2Setting Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2 Resetting the Access Point Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4Enabling Authentication and Encryption Schemes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5Configuring Kerberos Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9
  8. 8. viii AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide Configuring 802.1x EAP Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11 Configuring WEP Encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-17 Configuring KeyGuard Encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-19 Configuring WPA/WPA2 Using TKIP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-21 Configuring WPA2-CCMP (802.11i) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-25 Configuring Firewall Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-28 Configuring LAN to WAN Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-31 Configuring the WAN for an AP 7181 Hotspot . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-34 Available Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-34 Configuring Advanced Subnet Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-35 Configuring VPN Tunnels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-38 Configuring Manual Key Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-42 Configuring Auto Key Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-46 Configuring IKE Key Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-50 Viewing VPN Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-53 Configuring Content Filtering Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-56 Configuring Rogue AP Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-60 Moving Rogue APs to the Allowed AP List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-63 Displaying Rogue AP Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-65 Using MUs to Detect Rogue Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-68 Configuring User Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-70 Configuring the RADIUS Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-70 Configuring LDAP Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-74 Configuring a Proxy RADIUS Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-76 Managing the Local User Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-78 Mapping Users to Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-80 Defining User Access Permissions by Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-82 Editing Group Access Permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-84 Chapter 7. Monitoring Statistics Viewing WAN Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2 Viewing LAN Statistics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7 Viewing a LAN’s STP Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-10 Viewing Wireless Statistics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-13 Viewing WLAN Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-16 Viewing Radio Statistics Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-20
  9. 9. ix Viewing Radio Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-22 Retry Histogram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-27 DFS Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-28Viewing MU Statistics Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-29 Viewing MU Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-31 Pinging Individual MUs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-34 MU Authentication Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-35Viewing the Mesh Statistics Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-36Viewing MeshConnex Statistics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-39Viewing Known Access Point Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-50Chapter 8. Configuring Mesh NetworkingMesh Networking Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1 MeshConnex Mesh Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2 Spanning Tree Mesh Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3Appendix A. Technical Specifications802.11 b/g/n Radio Characteristics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1802.11 a/n Radio Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2Antenna Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3Hardware Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4Environmental Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5Routing Protocol. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5Security. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6Software Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6Country Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7Appendix B. Third Party LicensingAppendix C. Customer SupportMotorola Mesh Networks Support Web Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1Motorola Mesh Networks Document Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1
  10. 10. x AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide Appendix D. Managing AP 7181 Networks with Wireless Manager Discovering Network Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1 System Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-7 Configurable Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-7 Reporting Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-11 Configuring Network Time Protocol (NTP). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-13 Import and Export Configuration Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-15 Configurable Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-15 Reporting Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-18 2.4 GHz Radio Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-20 2.4 GHz Configurable Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-20 2.4 GHz Radio Performance Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-21 2.4 GHz RF QoS Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-22 2.4 GHz MAC Protocol Data Units Aggregation. . . . . . . . . . . D-25 2.4 GHz Radio Beacon Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-26 2.4 GHz Channel/Power/Rates/Placement Settings . . . . . . . . . D-27 2.4 GHz QBSS Load Element Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-30 2.4 GHz ADEPT Antenna Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-31 2.4 GHz Reporting Variables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-32 2.4 GHz Radio Properties Reporting Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . D-32 2.4 GHz Performance Reporting Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-32 2.4 GHz Channel/Power/Rates/Placement Reporting VariablesD-33 2.4 GHz ADEPT Antenna Setting Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-34 5 GHz Radio Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-35 5 GHz Configurable Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-35 5 GHz Radio Performance Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-36 5 GHz RF QoS Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-37 5 GHz MAC Protocol Data Units Aggregation . . . . . . . . . . . . D-40 5 GHz Radio Beacon Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-41 5 GHz Channel/Power/Rates/Placement Settings . . . . . . . . . . D-42 5 GHz QBSS Load Element Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-45 5 GHz Reporting Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-46 5 GHz Radio Properties Reporting Variables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-46 5 GHz Performance Reporting Variables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-46 5 GHz Channel/Power/Rates/Placement Reporting Variables. D-47
  11. 11. xi 5 GHz ADEPT Antenna Setting Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-48MeshConnex Security Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-49 Certificate Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-51System Logging Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-52 Configurable Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-52SNMP Trap Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-55Geographic Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-59Software Upgrades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-61 Software Upgrades Using TFTP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-63Software Inventory Report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-71Neighbor Table Report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-74 Creating a Neighbor Table Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-74 States and Services Report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-78 Parallel Links Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-79Index
  12. 12. xii AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide
  13. 13. 1 IntroductionAs a standalone access point, the AP 7181 provides businesses with a consolidated wiredand wireless networking infrastructure, all in a single device. The integrated router,gateway, firewall, DHCP and AAA RADIUS servers, VPN and hot-spot gateway simplifyand reduce the costs associated with networking by eliminating the need to purchase andmanage multiple pieces of equipment.The AP 7181 is also designed to meet the needs of large outdoor networks. The networkcan be configured and managed for optimal performance using the Wireless Manager(WM) network management application. For more information, see Managing AP 7181Networks with Wireless Manager on page D-1.If you are new to using an access point for managing your network, refer to Theory ofOperations on page 1-20 for an overview on wireless networking fundamentals.Updated versions of this manual and other AP 7181 documentation can be found at:http://motorola.wirelessbroadbandsupport.com/support/mesh/library
  14. 14. 1-2 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide 1.1 Document Conventions The following graphical alerts are used in this document to indicate notable situations. NOTE Tips, hints, or special requirements that you should take note of. CAUTIONCare is required. Disregarding a caution can result in data loss ! or equipment malfunction. WARNING!Indicates a condition or procedure that could result in personal injury or equipment damage.
  15. 15. Introduction 1-31.2 Feature OverviewAn AP 7181 access point supports the following feature set: • Mesh Networking • Separate LAN and WAN Ports • Multiple Mounting Options • Antenna Support for 2.4 GHz and 5.x GHz Radios • Sixteen Configurable WLANs • Support for 4 BSSIDs per Radio • Quality of Service (QoS) Support • Industry Leading Data Security • VLAN Support • Multiple Management Accessibility Options • Updatable Firmware • Programmable SNMP v1/v2/v3 Trap Support • MU-MU Transmission Disallow • Voice Prioritization • Support for CAM and PSP MUs • Statistical Displays • Transmit Power Control • Advanced Event Logging Capability • Configuration File Import/Export Functionality • Factory Default Configuration Restoration • DHCP Support • Multi-Function LEDs • Additional LAN Subnet • On-board RADIUS Server Authentication • Hotspot Support • Routing Information Protocol (RIP) • Manual Date and Time Settings • Dynamic DNS
  16. 16. 1-4 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide • Auto Negotiation • Rogue AP Enhancements • Bandwidth Management Enhancements • RADIUS Time-Based Authentication • QBSS Support 1.2.1 Mesh Networking The AP 7181 can form a wireless mesh network, enabling multiple APs and clients to share a network connection wirelessly. APs participating in a mesh network can forward frames through other wireless APs over multiple "hops" to reach a bridged network. The AP 7181 supports two different types of mesh networking technology: The first type is MeshConnex Mesh Networking. MeshConnex is comparable to the technology used in drafts of the IEEE 802.11s mesh networking specification. The second type is Spanning Tree Mesh Networking, which uses standard bridge learning mechanisms. This technology is the same as that used in the AP 7131 and AP-51xx access points. For an overview on mesh networking as well as details on configuring the access point’s mesh networking functionality, see Configuring Mesh Networking on page 9-1. 1.2.1.1 Meshconnex Mesh Networking MeshConnex Mesh Networking uses a hybrid proactive/on-demand path MeshConnex selection protocol, similar to Ad hoc On Demand Distance Vector (AODV) routing protocols. Each device in the MeshConnex mesh pro actively manages its own path to the distribution WAN, but can also form peer-to-peer paths on demand to improve forwarding efficiency. MeshConnex is designed for large-scale, high-mobility outdoor mesh deployments. 1.2.1.2 Spanning Tree Mesh Networking Spanning Tree Mesh Networking uses industry-standard Spanning Tree protocols (1999 compliant version (802.1d) ) to form the mesh network. Spanning Tree frames are periodically forwarded across the network to detect topology changes such as APs being
  17. 17. Introduction 1-5added to or removed from the network. Spanning Tree Mesh Networking is designed forsmaller-scale indoor or point-to-point range extension networks.1.2.2 802.11n SupportMotorola provides full life-cycle support for either a new or existing 802.11n mobilitydeployment, from network design to day-to-day support. For information on deployingyour 802.11n radio, see Configuring the 802.11a/n or 802.11b/g/n Radio on page 5-60.1.2.3 Separate LAN and WAN PortsThe access point has one LAN (GE1/POE) port. and one WAN (GE2) port, each with theirown MAC address. The GE2 port can be configured as a WAN or a second LAN.The access point must manage all data traffic over the LAN connection carefully as eithera DHCP client, BOOTP client, DHCP server or using a static IP address. For detailedinformation on configuring the LAN port, see Configuring the LAN Interface on page 5-2.A Wide Area Network (WAN) is a widely dispersed telecommunications network. In acorporate environment, the WAN port might connect to a larger corporate network. For asmall business, the WAN port might connect to a DSL or cable modem to access theInternet. Regardless, network address information must be configured for the access point’sintended mode of operation.For detailed information on configuring the access point’s WAN port, see Configuring WANSettings on page 5-17.The LAN and WAN port MAC addresses can be located within the LAN and WAN Statsscreens.For detailed information on locating the access point’s MAC addresses, see Viewing WANStatistics on page 7-2 and Viewing LAN Statistics on page 7-7. For information on accesspoint MAC address assignments, see AP 7181 MAC Address Assignment on page 1-27.
  18. 18. 1-6 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide 1.2.4 Multiple Mounting Options The AP 7181 can attach to a wall, pole or roof parapet. Choose the appropriate mounting option based on the physical environment and coverage area requirements. Consultation with a Structural Engineer is recommended prior to installation. All hardware installations should be performed by a professional installer. For detailed information on the mounting options available , see Antenna Options on page 2-12. 1.2.5 Antenna Support for 2.4 GHz and 5.x GHz Radios The AP7181 features an integrated ADvanced Element Panel Technology (ADEPT) antenna system that is designed to support 802.11a/n and 802.11b/g/n radio. No other antennas are supported. 1.2.6 Sixteen Configurable WLANs A Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) is a data-communications system that flexibly extends the functionalities of a wired LAN. A WLAN does not require lining up devices for line-of-sight transmission, and are thus, desirable for wireless networking. Roaming users can be handed off from one access point to another like a cellular phone system. WLANs can therefore be configured around the needs of specific groups of users, even when they are not in physical proximity. Up to sixteen WLANs are configurable on each access point. To enable and configure WLANs on an access point radio, see Enabling Wireless LANs (WLANs) on page 5-29. 1.2.7 Support for 4 BSSIDs per Radio The access point supports four BSSIDs per radio. Each BSSID has a corresponding MAC address. The first MAC address corresponds to BSSID #1. The MAC addresses for the other three BSSIDs (BSSIDs #2, #3, #4) are derived by adding 1, 2, 3, respectively, to the radio MAC address. If the radio MAC address displayed on the Radio Settings screen is 00:A0:F8:72:20:DC, then the BSSIDs for that radio will have the following MAC addresses: BSSID MAC Address Hexadecimal Addition
  19. 19. Introduction 1-7BSSID #1 00:A0:F8:72:20:D0 Same as Radio MAC addressBSSID #2 00:A0:F8:72:20:D1 Radio MAC address +1BSSID #3 00:A0:F8:72:20:D2 Radio MAC address +2BSSID #4 00:A0:F8:72:20:D3 Radio MAC address +3For detailed information on strategically mapping BSSIDs to WLANs, see Configuring the802.11a/n or 802.11b/g/n Radio on page 5-60. For information on access point MACaddress assignments, seeAP 7181 MAC Address Assignment on page 1-27.1.2.8 Quality of Service (QoS) SupportThe QoS implementation provides applications running on different wireless devices avariety of priority levels to transmit data to and from the access point. Equal datatransmission priority is fine for data traffic from applications such as Web browsers, filetransfers or email, but is inadequate for multimedia applications.Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), video streaming and interactive gaming are highlysensitive to latency increases and throughput reductions. These forms of higher prioritydata traffic can significantly benefit from the QoS implementation.The WiFi MultimediaQOS Extensions (WMM) implementation used by the shortens the time betweentransmitting higher priority data traffic and is thus desirable for multimedia applications. Inaddition, U-APSD (WMM Power Save) is also supported.For detailed information on configuring QoS support, see Setting the WLAN Quality ofService (QoS) Policy on page 5-42.1.2.9 Industry Leading Data SecurityThe access point supports numerous encryption and authentication techniques to protect thedata transmitting on the WLAN.The following authentication techniques are supported: • Kerberos Authentication • EAP AuthenticationThe following encryption techniques are supported: • WEP Encryption
  20. 20. 1-8 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide • KeyGuard Encryption • Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) Using TKIP Encryption • WPA2-CCMP (802.11i) Encryption In addition, the access point supports the following additional security features: • Firewall Security • VPN Tunnels • Content Filtering For an overview on the encryption and authentication schemes available, refer to Configuring Access Point Security on page 6-1. 1.2.9.1 Kerberos Authentication Authentication is a means of verifying information transmitted from a secure source. If information is authentic, you know who created it and you know it has not been altered in any way since it was originated. Authentication entails a network administrator employing a software “supplicant” on their computer or wireless device. Authentication is critical for the security of any wireless LAN device. Traditional authentication methods are not suitable for use in wireless networks where an unauthorized user can monitor network traffic and intercept passwords. The use of strong authentication methods that do not disclose passwords is necessary. The access point uses the Kerberos authentication service protocol (specified in RFC 1510) to authenticate users/clients in a wireless network environment and to securely distribute the encryption keys used for both encrypting and decrypting. A basic understanding of RFC 1510 Kerberos Network Authentication Service (V5) is helpful in understanding how Kerberos works. By default, WLAN devices operate in an open system network where any wireless device can associate with an AP without authorization. Kerberos requires device authentication before access to the wired network is permitted. For detailed information on Kerbeors configurations, see Configuring Kerberos Authentication on page 6-9. 1.2.9.2 EAP Authentication The Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) feature provides access points and their associated MUs an additional measure of security for data transmitted over the wireless
  21. 21. Introduction 1-9network. Using EAP, authentication between devices is achieved through the exchange andverification of certificates.EAP is a mutual authentication method whereby both the MU and AP are required to provetheir identities. Like Kerberos, the user loses device authentication if the server cannotprovide proof of device identification.Using EAP, a user requests connection to a WLAN through the access point. The accesspoint then requests the identity of the user and transmits that identity to an authenticationserver. The server prompts the AP for proof of identity and then transmits the user data backto the server to complete the authentication process.An MU is not able to access the network if not authenticated. When configured for EAPsupport, the access point displays the MU as an EAP station.EAP is only supported on mobile devices running Windows XP, Windows 2000 (usingService Pack #4) and Windows Mobile 2003. Refer to the system administrator forinformation on configuring a RADIUS Server for EAP (802.1x) support.For detailed information on EAP configurations, see Configuring 802.1x EAPAuthentication on page 6-11.1.2.9.3 WEP EncryptionAll WLAN devices face possible information theft. Theft occurs when an unauthorizeduser eavesdrops to obtain information illegally. The absence of a physical connectionmakes wireless links particularly vulnerable to this form of theft. Most forms of WLANsecurity rely on encryption to various extents. Encryption entails scrambling and codinginformation, typically with mathematical formulas called algorithms, before theinformation is transmitted. An algorithm is a set of instructions or formula for scramblingthe data. A key is the specific code used by the algorithm to encrypt or decrypt the data.Decryption is the decoding and unscrambling of received encrypted data.The same device, host computer or front-end processor, usually performs both encryptionand decryption. The transmit or receive direction determines whether the encryption ordecryption function is performed. The device takes plain text, encrypts or scrambles the texttypically by mathematically combining the key with the plain text as instructed by thealgorithm, then transmits the data over the network. At the receiving end, another devicetakes the encrypted text and decrypts, or unscrambles, the text revealing the originalmessage. An unauthorized user can know the algorithm, but cannot interpret the encrypted
  22. 22. 1-10 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide data without the appropriate key. Only the sender and receiver of the transmitted data know the key. Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) is an encryption security protocol specified in the IEEE Wireless Fidelity (Wi-Fi) standard, 802.11b and supported by the AP. WEP encryption is designed to provide a WLAN with a level of security and privacy comparable to that of a wired LAN. The level of protection provided by WEP encryption is determined by the encryption key length and algorithm. An encryption key is a string of case sensitive characters used to encrypt and decrypt data packets transmitted between a mobile unit (MU) and the access point. An access point and its associated wireless clients must use the same encryption key (typically 1 through 4) to interoperate. For detailed information on WEP, see Configuring WEP Encryption on page 6-17. 1.2.9.4 KeyGuard Encryption Use KeyGuard to shield the master encryption keys from being discovered through hacking. KeyGuard negotiation takes place between the access point and MU upon association. The access point can use KeyGuard with Motorola MUs. KeyGuard is only supported on Motorola MUs making it a Motorola proprietary security mechanism. For detailed information on KeyGuard configurations, see Configuring KeyGuard Encryption on page 6-19. 1.2.9.5 Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) Using TKIP Encryption Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) is a security standard for systems operating with a Wi-Fi wireless connection. WEP’s lack of user authentication mechanisms is addressed by WPA. Compared to WEP, WPA provides superior data encryption and user authentication. WPA addresses the weaknesses of WEP by including: • a per-packet key mixing function • a message integrity check • an extended initialization vector with sequencing rules • a re-keying mechanism WPA uses an encryption method called Temporal Key Integrity Protocol (TKIP). WPA employs 802.1X and Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP). For detailed information on WPA using TKIP configurations, see Configuring WPA/WPA2 Using TKIP on page 6-21.
  23. 23. Introduction 1-111.2.9.6 WPA2-CCMP (802.11i) EncryptionWPA2 is a newer 802.11i standard that provides even stronger wireless security than Wi-FiProtected Access (WPA) and WEP. Counter-mode/CBC-MAC Protocol (CCMP) is thesecurity standard used by the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES). AES serves the samefunction TKIP does for WPA-TKIP. CCMP computes a Message Integrity Check (MIC)using the proven Cipher Block Message Authentication Code (CBC-MAC) technique.Changing just one bit in a message produces a totally different result.WPA2-CCMP is based on the concept of a Robust Security Network (RSN), which definesa hierarchy of keys with a limited lifetime (similar to TKIP). Like TKIP, the keys theadministrator provides are used to derive other keys. Messages are encrypted using a 128-bit secret key and a 128-bit block of data. The end result is an encryption scheme as secureas any the access point provides.For detailed information on WPA2-CCMP, see Configuring WPA2-CCMP (802.11i) onpage 6-25.1.2.9.7 Firewall SecurityA firewall keeps personal data in and hackers out. The access point’s firewall preventssuspicious Internet traffic from proliferating the access point managed network. The accesspoint performs Network Address Translation (NAT) on packets passing to and from theWAN port. This combination provides enhanced security by monitoring communicationwith the wired network.Most AP 7181 deployments do not require the use of a WAN port. Root nodes connectedto the wired network utilize the LAN port. Devices connected to a Root Node or a Non RootNode Ethernet interface use a LAN interface. The WAN port is often used when deployinga single AP 7181 as a hotspot and a wired interface is required to support Network AddressTranslation (NAT) or for initial configuration.For detailed information on configuring the access point’s firewall, see ConfiguringFirewall Settings on page 6-28.1.2.9.8 VPN TunnelsVirtual Private Networks (VPNs) are IP-based networks using encryption and tunnelingproviding users remote access to a secure LAN. In essence, the trust relationship isextended from one LAN across the public network to another LAN, without sacrificingsecurity. A VPN behaves like a private network; however, because the data travels through
  24. 24. 1-12 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide the public network, it needs several layers of security. The access point can function as a robust VPN gateway. For detailed information on configuring VPN security support, see Configuring VPN Tunnels on page 6-38. 1.2.9.9 Content Filtering Content filtering allows system administrators to block specific commands and URL extensions from going out through the WAN port. Therefore, content filtering affords system administrators selective control on the content proliferating the network and is a powerful screening tool. Content filtering allows the blocking of up to 10 files or URL extensions and allows blocking of specific outbound HTTP, SMTP, and FTP requests. For detailed information on configuring content filtering support, see Configuring Content Filtering Settings on page 6-56. 1.2.10 VLAN Support A Virtual Local Area Network (VLAN) can electronically separate data on the same AP from a single broadcast domain into separate broadcast domains. By using a VLAN, you can group by logical function instead of physical location. There are 16 VLANs supported on the access point. An administrator can map up to 16 WLANs to 16 VLANs and enable or disable dynamic VLAN assignment. In addition to these 16 VLANs, the access point supports dynamic, user-based, VLANs when using EAP authentication. VLANs enable organizations to share network resources in various network segments within large areas (airports, shopping malls, etc.). A VLAN is a group of clients with a common set of requirements independent of their physical location. VLANs have the same attributes as physical LANs, but they enable administrators to group clients even when they are not members of the same network segment. For detailed information on configuring VLAN support, see Configuring VLAN Support on page 5-5. 1.2.11 Multiple Management Accessibility Options The access point can be accessed and configured using one of the following: • Java-Based Web UI • Human readable config file (imported via FTP or TFTP)
  25. 25. Introduction 1-13 • MIB (Management Information Base) • Command Line Interface (CLI) accessed via the RJ-45 port or Telnet. Use the access point’s RJ-45 serial port for direct access to the command-line interface from a PC. Use a Null-Modem cable for the best fitting connection.1.2.12 Updatable FirmwareMotorola periodically releases updated versions of device firmware to the Motorola Website. If the firmware version displayed on the System Settings screen (see ConfiguringSystem Settings on page 4-3) is older than the version on the Web site, Motorolarecommends updating the access point to the latest firmware version for full featurefunctionality.For detailed information on updating the firmware using FTP or TFTP, see UpdatingDevice Firmware on page 4-52.1.2.13 Programmable SNMP v1/v2/v3 Trap SupportSimple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) facilitates the exchange of managementinformation between network devices. SNMP uses Management Information Bases (MIBs)to manage the device configuration and monitor Internet devices in remote locations. MIBinformation accessed via SNMP is defined by a set of managed objects called ObjectIdentifiers (OIDs). An OID is used to uniquely identify each object variable of a MIB.SNMP allows a network administrator to configure the access point, manage networkperformance, find and solve network problems, and plan network growth. The access pointsupports SNMP management functions for gathering information from its networkcomponents. The access point’s download site contains the following MIB files supportingthe AP 7181: • Symbol-CC-WS2000-MIB-2.0 (standard MIB file) • Symbol-AP-MIB (relevant to the AP 7181 feature set)The access point’s SNMP agent functions as a command responder and is a multilingualagent responding to SNMPv1, v2c and v3 managers (command generators). The factorydefault configuration maintains SNMPv1/2c support of community names, thus providingbackward compatibility.For detailed information on configuring SNMP traps, see Configuring SNMP Settings onpage 4-23.
  26. 26. 1-14 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide 1.2.14 MU-MU Transmission Disallow The access point’s MU-MU Disallow feature prohibits MUs from communicating with each other even if on the same WLAN, assuming one of the WLAN’s is configured to disallow MU-MU communication. Therefore, if an MU’s WLAN is configured for MU- MU disallow, it will not be able to communicate with any other MUs connected to this access point. For detailed information on configuring an WLAN to disallow MU to MU communications, see Creating/Editing Individual WLANs on page 5-32. 1.2.15 Voice Prioritization Each access point WLAN has the capability of having its QoS policy configured to prioritize the network traffic requirements for associated MUs. A WLAN QoS page is available for each enabled WLAN on either the 802.11a/n or 802.11b/g/n radio. Use the QoS page to enable voice prioritization for devices to receive the transmission priority they may not normally receive over other data traffic. Voice prioritization allows the access point to assign priority to voice traffic over data traffic, and (if necessary) assign legacy voice supported devices (non WMM supported voice devices) additional priority. For detailed information on configuring voice prioritization over other voice enabled devices, see Setting the WLAN Quality of Service (QoS) Policy on page 5-42. 1.2.16 Support for CAM and PSP MUs The access point supports both CAM and PSP powered MUs. CAM (Continuously Aware Mode) MUs leave their radios on continuously to hear every beacon and message transmitted. These systems operate without any adjustments by the access point. A beacon is a uniframe system packet broadcast by the AP to keep the network synchronized. A beacon includes the ESSID, MAC address, Broadcast destination addresses, a time stamp, a DTIM (Delivery Traffic Indication Message) and the TIM (Traffic Indication Map). PSP (Power Save Polling) MUs power off their radios for short periods. When a MU in PSP mode associates with an access point, it notifies the access point of its activity status. The access point responds by buffering packets received for the MU. PSP mode is used to extend an MU’s battery life by enabling the MU to “sleep” during periods of inactivity.
  27. 27. Introduction 1-151.2.17 Statistical DisplaysThe access point can display robust transmit and receive statistics for the WAN and LANports. WLAN stats can be displayed collectively and individually for enabled WLANs.Transmit and receive statistics are available for the access point’s 802.11a/n and 802.11b/g/n radios. An advanced radio statistics page is also available to display retry histogramsfor specific data packet retry information.Associated MU stats can be displayed collectively and individually for specific MUs. Anecho (ping) test is also available to ping specific MUs to assess association strength.Finally, the access point can detect and display the properties of other APs detected withinits radio coverage area. The type of AP detected can be displayed as well as the propertiesof individual APs.For detailed information on available access point statistical displays and the values theyrepresent, see Monitoring Statistics on page 7-1.1.2.18 Transmit Power ControlThe access point has a configurable power level for each radio. This enables the networkadministrator to define the antenna’s transmission power level in respect to the accesspoint’s placement or network requirements as defined in the site survey.For detailed information on setting the radio transmit power level, see Configuring the802.11a/n or 802.11b/g/n Radio on page 5-60.1.2.19 Advanced Event Logging CapabilityThe access point periodically logs system events. Logging events is useful in assessing thethroughput and performance of the access point or troubleshooting problems on the accesspoint managed Local Area Network (LAN).For detailed information on access point events, see Logging Configuration on page 4-45.1.2.20 Configuration File Import/Export FunctionalityConfiguration settings for an access point can be downloaded from the currentconfiguration of another access point. This affords the administrator the ability to save thecurrent configuration before making significant changes or restoring a defaultconfiguration.
  28. 28. 1-16 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide For detailed information on importing or exporting configuration files, see Importing/ Exporting Configurations on page 4-48. 1.2.21 Factory Default Configuration Restoration The access point can restore its default configuration or a partial default configuration (with the exception of current WAN and SNMP settings). Restoring the factory default configuration is a good way to create new WLANs if the MUs the access point supports have been moved to different radio coverage areas. For detailed information on restoring a default or partial default configuration, see CAUTIONiIf the AP is NOT directly connected via a LAN cable, ! you will loose the Radio connection when performing a default configuration restoration. Configuring System Settings on page 4-3. 1.2.22 DHCP Support The access point can use Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) to obtain a leased IP address and configuration information from a remote server. DHCP is based on the BOOTP protocol and can coexist or interoperate with BOOTP. Configure the access point to send out a DHCP request searching for a DHCP/BOOTP server to acquire HTML, firmware or network configuration files when the access point boots. Because BOOTP and DHCP interoperate, whichever responds first becomes the server that allocates information. The access point can be set to only accept replies from DHCP or BOOTP servers or both (this is the default setting). Disabling DHCP disables BOOTP and DHCP and requires network settings to be set manually. If running both DHCP and BOOTP, do not select BOOTP Only. BOOTP should only be used when the server is running BOOTP exclusively. The DHCP client automatically sends a DHCP request at an interval specified by the DHCP server to renew the IP address lease as long as the access point is running (this parameter is programmed at the DHCP server). For example: Windows 2000 servers typically are set for 3 days.
  29. 29. Introduction 1-171.2.23 Multi-Function LEDsSix LEDs located on the bottom of the AP 7181 illuminate to indicate various states for thedevice. For detailed information on the access point LEDs and their functionality, seeInstalling an AP 7181 on page 2-15.1.2.24 Mesh Networking1.2.25 Additional LAN SubnetIn a typical retail or small office environment (wherein a wireless network is availablealong with a production WLAN) it is often necessary to segment a LAN into two subnets.Consequently, a second LAN is required to “segregate” wireless traffic.The access point has a second LAN subnet enabling administrators to segment the accesspoint’s LAN connection into two separate networks. The main access point LAN screennow allows the user to select either LAN1 or LAN2 as the active LAN over the accesspoint’s Ethernet port. Both LANs can still be active at any given time, but only one cantransmit over the access point’s physical LAN connection. Each LAN has a separateconfiguration screen (called LAN 1 and LAN 2 by default) accessible under the main LANscreen. The user can rename each LAN as necessary. Additionally, each LAN can have itsown Ethernet Type Filter configuration, and subnet access (HTTP, SSH, SNMP and telnet)configuration.For detailed information on configuring the access point for additional LAN subnetsupport, see Configuring the LAN Interface on page 5-2.1.2.26 On-board RADIUS Server AuthenticationThe access point can function as a RADIUS Server to provide user database informationand user authentication. Several new screens have been added to the access point’s menutree to configure RADIUS server authentication and configure the local user database andaccess policies. The new RADIUS Server functionality allows an administrator to definethe data source, authentication type and associate digital certificates with the authenticationscheme. The LDAP screen allows the administrator to configure an external LDAP Serverfor use with the access point. A new Access Policy screen enables the administrator to setWLAN access based on user groups defined within the User Database screen. Each user isauthorized based on the access policies applicable to that user. Access policies allow anadministrator to control access to a user groups based on the WLAN configurations.
  30. 30. 1-18 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide For detailed information on configuring the access point for AAA RADIUS Server support, see Configuring User Authentication on page 6-70. 1.2.27 Hotspot Support The access point allows hotspot operators to provide user authentication and accounting without a special client application. The access point uses a traditional Internet browser as a secure authentication device. Rather than rely on built-in 802.11security features to control access point association privileges, you can configure a WLAN with no WEP (an open network). The access point issues an IP address to the user using a DHCP server, authenticates the user and grants the user to access the Internet. If a tourist visits a public hotspot and wants to browse a Web page, they boot their laptop and associate with a local Wi-Fi network by entering a valid SSID. They start a browser, and the hotspot’s access controller forces the un-authenticated user to a Welcome page (from the hotspot operator) that allows the user to login with a username and password. In order to send a redirected page (a login page), a TCP termination exists locally on the access point. Once the login page displays, the user enters their credentials. The access point connects to the RADIUS server and determines the identity of the connected wireless user. Thus, allowing the user to access the Internet once successfully authenticated. For detailed information on configuring the access point for Hotspot support, see Configuring WLAN Hotspot Support on page 5-49. 1.2.28 Routing Information Protocol (RIP) RIP is an interior gateway protocol that specifies how routers exchange routing-table information. The parent Router screen also allows the administrator to select the type of RIP and the type of RIP authentication used. For detailed information on configuring RIP functionality as part of the access point’s Router functionality, see Setting the RIP Configuration on page 5-95. 1.2.29 Manual Date and Time Settings As an alternative to defining a NTP server to provide access point system time, the access point can now have its date and time set manually. A new Manual Date/Time Setting screen can be used to set the time using a Year-Month-Day HH:MM:SS format. For detailed information on manually setting the access point’s system time, see Configuring Network Time Protocol (NTP) on page 4-41.
  31. 31. Introduction 1-191.2.30 Dynamic DNSThe access point supports the Dynamic DNS service. Dynamic DNS (or DynDNS) is afeature offered by www.dyndns.com allowing the mapping of domain names to dynamicallyassigned IP addresses. When the dynamically assigned IP address of a client changes, thenew IP address is sent to the DynDNS service and traffic for the specified domain(s) isrouted to the new IP address. For information on configuring Dynamic DNS, seeConfiguring Dynamic DNS on page 5-27.1.2.31 Auto NegotiationAuto negotiation enables the access point to automatically exchange information about datatransmission speed and duplex capabilities. Auto negotiation is helpful when using theaccess point in an environment where different devices are connected and disconnected ona regular basis. For information on configuring the auto negotiation feature, seeConfiguring the LAN Interface on page 5-2 or Configuring WAN Settings on page 5-17.1.2.32 Rogue AP EnhancementsThe access point can scan for rogues over all channels on both of the access point’s radiobands. For information on configuring the access point for Rogue AP support, seeConfiguring Rogue AP Detection on page 6-60.1.2.33 Bandwidth Management EnhancementsUse the Bandwidth Management screen to control the network bandwidth allotted toindividual WLANs. Define a weighted scheme as needed when WLAN traffic supportinga specific network segment becomes critical. Bandwidth management is configured on aper-WLAN basis. With this segregated radio approach, bandwidth management can beconfigured uniquely for individual WLANs on different access point radios.For information on configuring bandwidth management, see Configuring BandwidthManagement Settings on page 5-76.1.2.34 RADIUS Time-Based AuthenticationAn external server maintains a users and groups database used by the access point foraccess permissions. Various kinds of access policies can be applied to each group.Individual groups can be configured with their own time-based access policy. Each group’spolicy has a user defined interval defining the days and hours access is permitted.
  32. 32. 1-20 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide Authentication requests for users belonging to the group are honored only during these defined hourly intervals. For more information on defining access point access policies by group, see Defining User Access Permissions by Group on page 6-82. 1.2.35 QBSS Support Each access point radio can be configured to optionally allow the access point to communicate channel usage data to associated devices and define the beacon interval used for channel utilization transmissions. The QBSS load represents the percentage of time the channel is in use by the access point and the access point’s station count. This information is very helpful in assessing the access point’s overall load on a channel, its availability for additional device associations and multi media traffic support. For information on enabling QBSS and defining the channel utilization transmission interval, see Configuring the 802.11a/n or 802.11b/g/n Radio on page 5-60. 1.3 Theory of Operations To understand access point management and performance alternatives, users need familiarity with functionality and configuration options. The access point includes features for different interface connections and network management. The access point uses electromagnetic waves to transmit and receive electric signals without wires. Users communicate with the network by establishing radio links between mobile units (MUs) and access points. The access point uses DSSS (direct sequence spread spectrum) to transmit digital data from one device to another. A radio signal begins with a carrier signal that provides the base or center frequency. The digital data signal is encoded onto carriers using a DSSS chipping algorithm. The radio signal propagates into the air as electromagnetic waves. A receiving antenna (on the MU) in the path of the waves absorbs the waves as electrical signals. The receiving MU interprets (demodulates) the signal by reapplying the direct sequence chipping code. This demodulation results in the original digital data. The access point uses its environment (the air and certain objects) as the transmission medium. the access point can either transmit in the 2.4 to 2.5-GHz frequency range (802.11b/g/n radio) or the 5 GHz frequency range (802.11a/n radio), the actual range is country-dependent. Motorola devices, like other Ethernet devices, have unique, hardware
  33. 33. Introduction 1-21encoded Media Access Control (MAC) or IEEE addresses. MAC addresses determine thedevice sending or receiving data. A MAC address is a 48-bit number written as sixhexadecimal bytes separated by colons. For example: 00:A0:F8:24:9A:C8Also see the following: • Wireless Coverage • MAC Layer Bridging • Content Filtering • DHCP Support • Media Types • Direct-Sequence Spread Spectrum • MU Association Process • Operating Modes • Management Access Options • AP 7181 MAC Address Assignment1.3.1 Wireless CoverageAn access point establishes an average communication range with MUs called a BasicService Set (BSS) or cell. When in a particular cell, the MU associates and communicateswith the access point supporting the radio coverage area of that cell. Adding access pointsto a single LAN establishes more cells to extend the range of the network. Configuring thesame ESSID (Extended Service Set Identifier) on all access points makes them part of thesame Wireless LAN.Access points with the same ESSID define a coverage area. A valid ESSID is analphanumeric, case-sensitive identifier up to 32 characters. An MU searches for an accesspoint with a matching ESSID and synchronizes (associates) to establish communications.This device association allows MUs within the coverage area to move about or roam. Asthe MU roams from cell to cell, it associates with a different access point. The roam occurswhen the MU analyzes the reception quality at a location and determines a differentprovides better signal strength and lower MU load distribution.If the MU does not find an access point with a workable signal, it can perform a scan to findany AP. As MUs switch APs, the AP updates its association statistics.
  34. 34. 1-22 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide The user can configure the ESSID to correspond to up to 16 WLANs on each 802.11a/n or 802.11b/g/n radio. A Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) is a data-communications system that flexibly extends the functionalities of a wired LAN. A WLAN does not require lining up devices for line-of-sight transmission, and are thus, desirable. Within the WLAN, roaming users can be handed off from one access point to another like a phone system. WLANs can therefore be configured around the needs of specific groups of users, even when they are not in physical proximity. 1.3.2 MAC Layer Bridging The access point provides MAC layer bridging between its interfaces. The access point monitors traffic from its interfaces and, based on frame address, forwards the frames to the proper destination. The access point tracks source and destination addresses to provide intelligent bridging as MUs roam or network topologies change. The access point also handles broadcast and multicast messages and responds to MU association requests. The access point listens to all packets on its LAN and WAN interfaces and builds an address database using MAC addresses. An address in the database includes the interface media that the device uses to associate with the access point. The access point uses the database to forward packets from one interface to another. The bridge forwards packets addressed to unknown systems to the Default Interface (Ethernet). The access point internal stack interface handles all messages directed to the access point. Each stores information on destinations and their interfaces to facilitate forwarding. When a user sends an ARP (Address Resolution Protocol) request packet, the access point forwards it over all enabled interfaces except over the interface the ARP request packet was received. On receiving the ARP response packet, the access point database keeps a record of the destination address along with the receiving interface. With this information, the access point forwards any directed packet to the correct destination. Transmitted ARP request packets echo back to other MUs. The access point removes from its database the destination or interface information not used for a specified time. The AP refreshes its database when it transmits or receives data from these destinations and interfaces. 1.3.3 Media Types The access point radio interface conforms to IEEE 802.11 specifications. The access point supports multiple-cell operations with fast roaming between cells. Within a direct-sequence
  35. 35. Introduction 1-23system, each cell can operates independently. Adding cells to the network provides anincreased coverage area and total system capacity.The serial port provides a Command Line Interface (CLI) connection. The serial linksupports a direct serial connection. The access point is a Data Terminal Equipment (DTE)device with male pin connectors for the RS-232 port. Connecting the access point to a PCrequires a null modem serial cable.1.3.4 Direct-Sequence Spread SpectrumSpread spectrum (broadband) uses a narrowband signal to spread the transmission over asegment of the radio frequency band or spectrum. Direct-sequence is a spread spectrumtechnique where the transmitted signal is spread over a particular frequency range. Theaccess point usesDirect-Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS) for radio communication.Direct-sequence systems communicate by continuously transmitting a redundant pattern ofbits called a chipping sequence. Each bit of transmitted data is mapped into chips by theaccess point and rearranged into a pseudorandom spreading code to form the chippingsequence. The chipping sequence is combined with a transmitted data stream to produce theoutput signal.MUs receiving a direct-sequence transmission use the spreading code to map the chipswithin the chipping sequence back into bits to recreate the original data transmitted by theaccess point. Intercepting and decoding a direct-sequence transmission requires apredefined algorithm to associate the spreading code used by the transmitting access pointto the receiving MU. This algorithm is established by IEEE 802.11b specifications. The bitredundancy within the chipping sequence enables the receiving MU to recreate the originaldata pattern, even if bits in the chipping sequence are corrupted by interference.The ratio of chips per bit is called the spreading ratio. A high spreading ratio increases theresistance of the signal to interference. A low spreading ratio increases the bandwidthavailable to the user. The access point uses different modulation schemes to encode morebits per chip at higher data rates.1.3.5 MU Association ProcessAn access point recognizes MUs as they begin the association process. An access pointkeeps a list of the MUs it services. MUs associate with an access point based on thefollowing conditions:
  36. 36. 1-24 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide • Signal strength between the Access Point and MU • Number of MUs currently associated with the access point • MUs encryption and authentication capabilities • MUs supported data rate MUs perform pre-emptive roaming by intermittently scanning for ’s and associating with the best available access point. Before roaming and associating, MUs perform full or partial scans to collect statistics and determine the direct-sequence channel used by the access point. Scanning is a periodic process where the MU sends out probe messages on all channels defined by the country code. The statistics enable an MU to reassociate by synchronizing its channel to the access point. The MU continues communicating with that until it needs to switch cells or roam. MUs perform partial scans at programmed intervals, when missing expected beacons or after excessive transmission retries. In a partial scan, the MU scans access points classified as proximate on the access point table. For each channel, the MU tests for Clear Channel Assessment (CCA). The MU broadcasts a probe with the ESSID and broadcast BSS_ID when the channel is transmission-free. It sends an ACK to a directed probe response from the access point and updates the table. An MU can roam within a coverage area by switching access points. Roaming occurs when: • Unassociated MU attempts to associate or reassociate with an available access point • Supported rate changes or the MU finds a better transmit rate with another access point • RSSI (received signal strength indicator) of a potential access point exceeds the current access point • Ratio of good-transmitted packets to attempted-transmitted packets that fall below a threshold. An MU selects the best available access point and adjusts itself to the access point direct- sequence channel to begin association. Once associated, the access point begins forwarding frames addressed to the target MU. Each frame contains fields for the current direct- sequence channel. The MU uses these fields to resynchronize to the access point.
  37. 37. Introduction 1-25The scanning and association process continues for active MUs. This process allows MUsto find new access points and discard out-of-range or deactivated access points. By testingthe airwaves, MUs can choose the best network connection available.1.3.6 Operating ModesThe access point can operate in a couple of configurations. • Mesh Point Root Nodes - AP 7181 devices attached to the wired network are considered Root Nodes. Root nodes serve as gateways between the wireless mesh network and the wired network. Root node locations should be determined first since they control the critical function of routing to and from the wired network. Root nodes must have an Ethernet connection to the core network. The AP 7181 Ethernet ports support 10/10/1000 Mbps Ethernet connections. If direct Ethernet is not available or within distance requirements of the core network wireless backhaul technology such as Motorola Point to Multi Point or Motorola Point to Point systems can be used. • PPPoE - The WAN interface can terminate a PPPoE connection, thus enabling the access point to operate in conjunction with a DSL or Cable modem to provide WAN connectivity. • NAT - (Network Address Translation) on the Wireless interface. Using NAT, the router is able to manage a private IP scheme. NAT allows translation of private addresses to the WAN IP address. • DHCP - The access point can assign private IP addresses. • Firewall - A Firewall protects against a number of known attacks. • Mesh Point Nodes- Mesh Points are AP7181 devices that are not connected to the wired network. They can support a camera or other device attached via the Ethernet connection.
  38. 38. 1-26 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide 1.3.7 Management Access Options Managing the access point includes viewing network statistics and setting configuration options. Statistics track the network activity of associated MUs and data transfers on the AP interfaces. The access point requires one of the following connection methods to perform a custom installation and manage the network: • Secure Java-Based WEB UI - (use Sun Microsystems’ JRE 1.5 or higher available from Sun’s Web site and be sure to disable Microsoft’s Java Virtual Machine if installed) • Command Line Interface (CLI) via Serial, Telnet and SSH • Config file - Human-readable; Importable/Exportable via FTP and TFTP MIB (Management Information Base) accessing the access point SNMP function using a MIB Browser. The access point’s download site contains the following MIB files supporting the AP 7181: • Symbol-CC-WS2000-MIB-2.0 (standard MIB file) • Symbol-AP-MIB (relevant to the AP 7181 feature set) Make configuration changes to access point’s individually. Optionally, use the access point import/export configuration function to download settings to other access points. For detailed information, see Importing/Exporting Configurations on page 4-48.
  39. 39. Introduction 1-271.3.8 AP 7181 MAC Address AssignmentFor an AP 7181 model access point, MAC address assignments are as follows: • WAN (GE2) - The access point MAC address can be found underneath the access point chassis. • LAN1 (GE1) - WAN MAC address + 1. • LAN2 - A virtual LAN not mapped to the LAN Ethernet port. This address is the lowest of the two radio MAC addresses. • Radio1 (802.11b/g/n) - Random address located on the Web UI, CLI and SNMP interfaces. • Radio2 (802.11a/n) - Random address located on the Web UI, CLI and SNMP interfaces.The access point’s BSS (virtual AP) MAC addresses are calculated as follows: • BSS1 - The same as the corresponding base radio’s MAC address. • BSS2 - Base radio MAC address +1 • BSS3 - Base radio MAC address +2 • BSS4 - Base radio MAC address +3
  40. 40. 1-28 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide
  41. 41. 2 Hardware InstallationAn AP 7181 access point installation includes mounting the access point, connecting theaccess point to the network, and applying power. Installation procedures vary for differentenvironments. • Precautions • Deployment Guidelines • Installation Methodology • Grounding Requirements • Minimum Installation Requirements • Package Contents • Access Point Placement • Antenna Options • AP 7181 Power Options • Mounting an AP 7181 • Installing an AP 7181
  42. 42. 2-2 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide • Field Installation • Remote Panel Antenna Installation 2.1 Precautions Before installing an AP 7181 model access point verify the following: • Become familiar with grounding requirements (see Grounding Requirements). • Verify the environment has a continuous temperature range between -40° C to 55° C AP 7181 devices must be installed by trained professionals familiar with RF planning and regulatory limits defined by the regulatory bodies of the country where the devices are being deployed. All common precautions for grounding and ESD (Electrostatic Discharge) protection should be observed during deployment and installation. AP 7181 devices are designed to be installed outdoors and must be installed such that no harmful interference results from device operation. CAUTIONAll device wiring must comply with the National Electric code (NEC) or regulations and procedures defined by the regulatory ! bodies of the country or region where the devices are being deployed. All local building and structure codes must be observed. WARNING!Strictly observe the following Safety Precautions during the AP 7181 Installation Procedure. • Installations must be performed by professionals who are properly trained and certified. • Avoid contact with overhead power lines. • Take precautions to avoid injury from falling tools and equipment. Crews should wear hard hats in and around the installation work site. • Be aware of vehicular traffic in and around the installation work site.
  43. 43. Hardware Installation 2-3 • Do not hold any component containing a radio such that the antenna is very close to or touching any exposed parts of the body, especially the face or eyes, while transmitting. • Do not operate a portable transmitter near unshielded blasting caps or in an environment where explosives are present unless the transmitter is especially certified for such use.2.2 Deployment GuidelinesObserve the following recommended guidelines to help ensure a successful networkdeployment: • Mounting height for network devices should not exceed 30 to 35 feet. Mounting height should vary to accommodate the topography of the deployment area, foliage, and other obstructions. • Devices can be deployed using either the Bottom Mount Installation or the Top Mount Installation procedure. • Point-to-Point (PTP (Slave)) or Point-to-Multipoint (PMP (SM)) nodes providing backhaul should be oriented to point away from AP 7181 antenna panels. • DO NOT assign the frequencies allocated for the AP 7181 2.4 (2.4-2.462 GHz) and 5.8 (5.725-5.850 GHz) radios to any of the PTP or PMP devices providing backhaul. NOTE For more detailed deployment considerations for backhaul, refer to the Mesh AP 7181 System Planner. • Custom stand-off brackets should be used as required to provide adequate pole separation in an effort to minimize reflective received power. • LoS guidelines should be given special consideration whenever devices will not be installed in a straight line, such as deploying devices on alternating sides of a roadway. • Ensure that all Root nodes are deployed with line of site to the wireless backhaul cluster points.
  44. 44. 2-4 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide 2.3 Installation Methodology Consideration of the order in which units are installed when deploying an AP 7181 wireless network can work to ensure a more stable and functional network. The PTP backhaul layer should be deployed first. Next deploy all nodes for the PMP Access Point distribution layer. Next deploy Root nodes along with PMP Subscriber Modules (SMs) such that backhaul and network connectivity can be verified or corrected. Finally, deploy all Mesh Point wireless nodes in order of the least to most hops (1 hop nodes first, followed by 2 hop nodes, etc.). 2.4 Grounding Requirements To avoid damage to the equipment, become familiar with Motorola Policy R56 before installing AP 7181 units. Refer to Standards and Guidelines For Communication Sites, Version B. Both the hardcopy manual (Part Number 68P81089E50-B) and the CD version (Part Number 9880384V83) can be ordered from Motorola. Section 7.6.4 Broadband - Wireless Access Point Network from the Standards and Guidelines For Communication Sites applies directly to AP 7181 deployments: SPD (Surge Protection Device) considerations for broadband shall include the use of SPDs to protect pole-mounted access points and ground-based cabinet architecture. It is important to install proper SPD applications on both ends of Ethernet, Power-Over Ethernet (POE), Giga-Ethernet (GigE) and AC cable runs. SPDs shall be located within the node or cabinet, or as close to the entrance as possible, and properly installed into load centers, control panels and utility power cabinets. While RF protection is a consideration, it shall only be required when antennas are connected to the node with coaxial cables greater than 610 mm (2 ft.) in length. The grounding cable for an AP 7181 must be a #8 gauge (10 mm²) wire cross section and use a Ring Lug that will fit the M5 Grounding Screw on the bottom of the unit. CAUTIONIt is required that all root and portal nodes be adequately grounded. In addition, all root nodes and portals using the Ethernet port or attached devices (e.g. a camera) must not only ! be grounded, but they should also include surge suppression for network reliability. This is particularly important for network configurations with a public safety component.
  45. 45. Hardware Installation 2-52.4.1 Ethernet and Lightning ProtectionWhen installing an AP 7181 Root Node that has a direct connection between the shieldedCAT-5E Ethernet and the wired network, lightning protection should be used on allShielded CAT-5E Ethernet connections.An outdoor rated Lightning Protection Unit (LPU) kit such as the Motorola PTPWB2907AA or the HyperLink AL-CAT6HPJW Lightning Protector should be used. Formore information on Motorola’s PTP Lightning Protection Unit, refer to the PTP-LPUTechnical Specifications.
  46. 46. 2-6 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide NOTE Lightning damage is not covered under the conditions of a standard Motorola product warranty. When installed correctly, LPUs provide the best protection from the harmful effects of lightning. Observe all regional and national codes that apply to grounding for lightning protection. 2.4.2 AP 7181 Grounding Hardware and Connections The grounding cable for an AP 7181 must be # 8 gauge wire and use a Ring Lug that will fit the M5 Grounding Screw on the bottom of the unit (see AP 7181 Connections and Ports). The Grounding Screw is shown below in green. When connecting the grounding cable to the unit, tighten the Grounding Screw to between 21.9 and 29.2 inch pounds (lbf-in).
  47. 47. Hardware Installation 2-7Access points mounted on a metallic pole should be grounded as shown in the followingfigure.
  48. 48. 2-8 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide Access points mounted on a nonmetallic pole should be grounded as shown in the following figure. When grounding a unit installed on a nonmetallic pole, a ground conductor and rod is required. This requirement should be factored into the project deployment costs, particularly if the equipment must be installed by a utility company. When grounding a unit installed on a wooden pole, a ground conductor and rod is required. This requirement should be factored into the project deployment costs, particularly if the equipment must be installed by a utility company.
  49. 49. Hardware Installation 2-92.5 Minimum Installation RequirementsThe minimum requirements for installing an AP 7181: • AP 7181 Access Point • Power Cable (Flying Leads) • Standard Ethernet cable • Yoke (attached) • 22 mm Socket and driver to remove port caps • #6 metric Allen Wrench to remove the Yoke2.6 Package ContentsCheck the package contents for the AP 7181. Each unit should contain: • AP 7181 Access Point (assembled with Mounting Yoke attached) • Power Cable • Optional accessories (in a separate box inside the AP 7181 shipping container)Contact the Motorola Support Center to report missing or improperly functioning items.Refer to Customer Support.2.7 Access Point PlacementTypically, roadways in the deployment area become main arteries for the wireless meshnetwork. Roadways can provide line-of-sight coverage over large distances between Rootand Non Root APs.2.7.1 Site SurveysMotorola recommends conducting a site survey prior to installing an access point. Athorough site survey must include a visit to the customer site to identify the characteristicsof the coverage area, including availability of electrical distribution for power sources andthe location of existing network infrastructure.The site survey should also includepreliminary WLAN measurements to identify candidate AP locationsWhen scheduling a visit to conduct a site survey, request access to wiring closets, adjacentfloors, and other locations that may require special permission.
  50. 50. 2-10 AP-7181 Access Point Product Reference Guide 2.7.2 Root Node Placement When planning for Root Node placement: • Identify Root node wireless backhaul technology (Point to Point (PTP), Point to Multi Point (PMP)). • Identify Ethernet or fiber optic backhaul. • Identify Root node locations. • Obtain all required permits and/or lease agreements. • Verify that power is available at each potential node deployment location. • Give careful consideration to the fact that Root nodes with a wireless backhaul usually backhaul traffic to a cluster point (i.e. PMP Canopy). • Wireless backhaul clusters can be on towers, rooftops, etc. • Ensure that all Root nodes are deployed with LoS to cluster points. When installing an AP7181 Root Node that has its Shielded CAT-5E Ethernet directly connected to the wired network Lightning protection should be used on all Shielded CAT- 5E Ethernet connections. An outdoor rated Lightning Protection Unit kit such as the Motorola PTP WB2978AA or the HyperLink AL-CAT6HPJW Lightning Protector should be used. For more information on Motorolas PTP Lightning Protection Unit, refer to the PTP-LPU Technical Specifications. 2.7.3 Non Root Node Placement The same guidelines as Root nodes apply with the exception of a backhaul requirement The placement of Non Root nodes will depend heavily on the RF network design. Consider the guidelines for optimizing wireless network performance when identifying potential mounting sites. In addition, consider the following when planning for Non Root node placement: • Light Poles, Utility Poles, or Traffic Poles • Obtain all required supplemental agreements from local governments and utilities. • Obtain a generic mounting agreement that is not specify specific poles, since installation locations may need to be modified during deployment. • Plan for AC power usage of 84 watts average, 126 watts peak.
  51. 51. Hardware Installation 2-11 • The AP 7181 is rated for wind loading of up to160 miles per hour and 30 pounds per square foot. • Ensure that proper grounding can be established. • The grounding cable for an AP 7181 must be a #8 gauge (10 mm²) wire cross section and use a Ring Lug that will fit the M5 Grounding Screw on the bottom of the unit. • Rooftops and Towers • May require lease agreements. • Identify AP locations based on optimal communication with the Root nodes. • Non Root node placement will be dependent on asset availability, terrain, etc. • Ensure that nodes are placed at the same height. • Build the network outward from each root node, from least to greatest number of hops.As with Root nodes, it should be noted that it is incumbent upon the customer to obtain therequired Pole Attachment Agreements for devices to be installed on traffic / utility poles.Obtaining the agreements can be a lengthy process, so ample lead time must be allowed.The potential pole locations should be logged with GPS to obtain accurate coordinates.Also log any identifying numbers on the pole so that this information can be provided tothe appropriate utility agency. Alternate mounting locations should also be identified in theevent that your initial request is denied.Specialized brackets may be required for attaching devices to decorative light poles andthese brackets may have to be custom fabricated. If this is the case, allow enough lead timefor ordering the proper equipment.Also consider any requirements to coordinate requests with multiple utility agencies withinthe same community. Verify that light pole selections have power available continuouslyand that the power source is within the operational range of the device being connected.2.7.4 Mounting LocationsTo avoid distortion of the RF pattern, device locations should be chosen such that the AP7181 ADvanced Element Panel Technology (ADEPT) antenna panels are at least 30 inchesfrom any nearby metal poles and not co-located or operating in conjunction with any otherantenna or transmitter.The antenna panels must also have a separation distance of at least 2meters from anyone who may come into proximity of the AP 7181.

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