Building a strong portfolio for
your leadership toolbox
Introductions
834 Design & Marketing
Kim Bode – Owner/Operator
Twitter: @834design
LinkedIn: 834 Design & Marketing
Facebo...
Activity
• The warm up:
– Write down the names of 5 leaders.
• The leader brand is the key that unlocks energies for leaders and
followers alike.
• Role play [theatrics, playing a par...
• Brand=hallmark of trust.
– Leader brand is a thought [examples]
• Become greater by committing to something greater.
• F...
• Create followers
– What are plans for the future including outcomes
– Invite people to participate
– Leaders awknowledge...
• Can’t fake a brand
– Leader brand is shorthand for the relationship value proposition
– Must be quickly grasped in a few...
• When a leader slips from the brand, the consequences are dire
– Followers leave
– People feel betrayed
– They tell other...
Branding importance in a tough economy
• Branding is as important as ever, as long as people understand what
that means.
–...
Rebranding after YEARS in one place
• Not difficult to do
• Should not hold you back
– If you've been branded by a perform...
Challenges of branding when you are new to career or have been
unemployed
• Be honest with yourself— the strengths and gap...
Learn from big brands
• The first thing to realize is that a brand is merely a promise to a group of
target consumers
• Th...
About branding
• Great brands communicate in a consistent manner and create a unique
position in the marketplace.
• Brands...
• Consistency communicates.
– It's more than just what you wear; lt's your personality, the way you
approach challenges — ...
Conduct your own SWOT
• Strengths
• Weaknesses
• Opportunities
• Threats
ACTIVITY: Creating a
BRAND new you
• The thing that people are good at is identifying their functional SWOT
components.
• However, they frequently miss their...
Partner UP and conduct a SWOT of 1 of your 5 leaders identified earlier-2
SWOT’s total
• Strengths
• Weaknesses
• Opportun...
Partner UP and conduct a SWOT of 1 of your classmates; exchange results
• Strengths
• Weaknesses
• Opportunities
• Threats...
• Sometimes people need to look through the eyes of another for the
SWOT
– Especially when you think about the W.
• Oftent...
1. Identify what you know -- or can teach others -- that is worth promoting.
2. Once you have identified a theme or topic ...
What do you know-or can teach others-that is worth promoting to others?
Keep two things in mind:
• First, it's helpful to ...
Make yourself marketable.
Your PITCH must meet at least one of the following criteria in order to appeal
to your audience
...
There exist many venues for
communicating your message:
• Bylined articles
• Photography
• Monetary contributions
• Commit...
• The goal of personal brand building is simple:
– To create a steady stream of original thought leadership that you
can d...
• Relationship building and cultivation are fundamental for consideration
of board positions.
• A personal brand is our ca...
• Personal brands are comprised of assets that contribute to the board
development strategies we employ. The goal is to ma...
• Integrity: Social, intellectual, emotional and other attributes are among
the core value characteristics consistent with...
• Leadership: Often businesses and initiatives don't fail on their own - lack
of direction and leadership can be the culpr...
• Commitment: Showing up when no one else does to do things no one
else will often is a game changer that sets us apart.
–...
• Persuasive: It is often said, many can draw a crowd, but not everyone
can build a community or move people to action aro...
• Discipline: Discipline is focused, not frivolous.
– Discipline to do what is right and follow through may have you
stand...
• Strategic Thinking: A good theory or idea is just that. It only becomes a
fact when tested and proven. Research, analysi...
• Team Builder: Effective teams function based on "what" is right being
more important than "who" is right.
– Those who ca...
• Creating a resource:
– Potential employers
– Board-seeking organizations
– Alumni associations
– Coworkers
– Historical ...
• Personal reflection statement
• Personal & professional goals
• Blueprint for success [action steps to fulfill personal ...
• What is your personal reflection statement? Include: Philosophy,
Objectives, Strategies and Methodologies
• Describe why...
• What is your leader brand?
– Full blown thought (not a slogan or catch phrase)
– No more than seven words
– Expresses wh...
• What are your personal & professional goals?
– Okay to organize in bullets
– Be ready to make actionable [that’s next]
–...
• What’s your blueprint for success [action steps to fulfill personal and
professional goals]
– Okay to organize in bullet...
• What makes you qualified?
• Education, training, competencies, professional skills
• Better yet, where are the gaps you ...
• How do you know? Who cares?
• Demonstrated & documented proficiencies, professional & personal
performance
• Better yet,...
• Start with a hook
– When someone asks, "what do you do," start with a short statement
designed to peak their curiosity.
...
• Stop talking
– After you deliver your hook it's important to shut up.
– Don't just do something, stand there.
– You need...
• Reel them in
– After a successful hook, don't launch into a sales pitch or
commercial. Your hook does not give you permi...
• Serve, don’t sell
– Remain focused on your listener's needs, not on your needs.
– The more you give to the world, the mo...
• Analog
– Portfolio provided
– Table of contents with page numbers
– Intro letter [change this per the opportunity]
– MAK...
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Building a strong personal brand & portfolio

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Presentation part of Urban Core Collective Transformational Leadership Program July 1, 2013

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Building a strong personal brand & portfolio

  1. 1. Building a strong portfolio for your leadership toolbox
  2. 2. Introductions 834 Design & Marketing Kim Bode – Owner/Operator Twitter: @834design LinkedIn: 834 Design & Marketing Facebook: /834design Adrienne Wallace MS, MPA – Project/Digital Director Twitter: @adriwall LinkedIn: /adriwall Facebook: /adrienneawallace
  3. 3. Activity • The warm up: – Write down the names of 5 leaders.
  4. 4. • The leader brand is the key that unlocks energies for leaders and followers alike. • Role play [theatrics, playing a part] vs. true style [temperament, attitude, mood, level of optimism, and determination] • Leader’s real work is to create followers and build relationships. – Brand suggests that followers can leave if brand is compromised or invalid – Command and keep trustworthiness – Broken trust = forfeit brand contract Theory-Leader Brands
  5. 5. • Brand=hallmark of trust. – Leader brand is a thought [examples] • Become greater by committing to something greater. • Focus energy to create meaningful change. • Manifest our vision in all of my actions • Create change, understand, adapt, and lead. Theory-Leader Brands
  6. 6. • Create followers – What are plans for the future including outcomes – Invite people to participate – Leaders awknowledge follower needs – Leader declares a willingness to fulfill needs – Be overt about intentions Theory-Leader Brands
  7. 7. • Can’t fake a brand – Leader brand is shorthand for the relationship value proposition – Must be quickly grasped in a few words – How do we know it works? • Viability and success – When a leader walks in to a room…do people think the brand? Theory-Leader Brands
  8. 8. • When a leader slips from the brand, the consequences are dire – Followers leave – People feel betrayed – They tell others – They lose energy for cause – They leave Theory-Leader Brands
  9. 9. Branding importance in a tough economy • Branding is as important as ever, as long as people understand what that means. – It's not a self-promotion campaign – Or some dress-for-success kind of idea – It's really who you are deep inside • what passions you have and how you can lead your most successful life Creating a BRAND new you
  10. 10. Rebranding after YEARS in one place • Not difficult to do • Should not hold you back – If you've been branded by a performance or reputation issue, that's a difficult place to reposition within the company. – Probably better to start somewhere else and try to rebrand. Creating a BRAND new you
  11. 11. Challenges of branding when you are new to career or have been unemployed • Be honest with yourself— the strengths and gaps that you may have — because certainly a future employer would do that on your behalf anyway. • Do a good brand audit of where you are and what you have to offer. • The thing that's empowering is you have overlooked transferable equities you have. Creating a BRAND new you
  12. 12. Learn from big brands • The first thing to realize is that a brand is merely a promise to a group of target consumers • The experience those consumers have — which results in the relationship that consumers have with that brand. • Promise + experience = relationship. • Personal branding should ask ‘what is our promise to people who matter in our lives, and are we delivering against that expectation?’ Creating a BRAND new you
  13. 13. About branding • Great brands communicate in a consistent manner and create a unique position in the marketplace. • Brands that stray from their core positioning frequently find themselves in the trouble mode. Creating a BRAND new you
  14. 14. • Consistency communicates. – It's more than just what you wear; lt's your personality, the way you approach challenges — it's the way you interact with people. – Example: if your goal is to be seen as a person who is willing to help other people in their careers, but your calendar is never open for people to meet with you, then the audio doesn't match the video. Creating a BRAND new you
  15. 15. Conduct your own SWOT • Strengths • Weaknesses • Opportunities • Threats ACTIVITY: Creating a BRAND new you
  16. 16. • The thing that people are good at is identifying their functional SWOT components. • However, they frequently miss their emotional SWOT components — and many times that's a tiebreaker for success or failure for somebody in his careen – It’s that emotional quotient they bring to their jobs. • Step back and look at this during positioning work and see what strengths and weaknesses you have. – Helps in growth and identifying gaps or opportunities. Creating a BRAND new you
  17. 17. Partner UP and conduct a SWOT of 1 of your 5 leaders identified earlier-2 SWOT’s total • Strengths • Weaknesses • Opportunities • Threats Activity: Creating a BRAND new you
  18. 18. Partner UP and conduct a SWOT of 1 of your classmates; exchange results • Strengths • Weaknesses • Opportunities • Threats Activity: Creating a BRAND new you
  19. 19. • Sometimes people need to look through the eyes of another for the SWOT – Especially when you think about the W. • Oftentimes people miss gaps because they try to rationalize that it's not a real issue. – It's better to face the gap right away and address it either by targeting different organizations or different careers than trying to convince yourself that this doesn't matter to an employer. • The second thing is that people narrow the field of opportunities. – Keep options bigger in general SWOT and use bullets for more concise opportunities. Creating a BRAND new you
  20. 20. 1. Identify what you know -- or can teach others -- that is worth promoting. 2. Once you have identified a theme or topic to pursue, make it marketable. 3. Once you have identified your point-of-view and pitch, identify the best platform to achieve your personal branding objectives. Bliss, J., & Wildrick, M. (2005). How to build a personal brand. Consulting to Management, 16(3), 6-10. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.gvsu.edu/docview/215901221?accountid= 39473 3 Steps Building Personal Branding Plan of Action/Process
  21. 21. What do you know-or can teach others-that is worth promoting to others? Keep two things in mind: • First, it's helpful to pick a subject on which you have some proprietary information, HEAVY experience or BIG passion. • Second, make sure the topic is of interest to your target audience (clients and prospects) and their gatekeepers (the media, conference organizers, television producers, book publishers, and so on). Bliss, J., & Wildrick, M. (2005). How to build a personal brand. Consulting to Management, 16(3), 6-10. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.gvsu.edu/docview/215901221?accountid= 39473 3 Steps- Identify a Point-of- View
  22. 22. Make yourself marketable. Your PITCH must meet at least one of the following criteria in order to appeal to your audience • Predictive: The pitch identifies industry trends or forecasts emerging developments. • Prescriptive: The pitch outlines key steps for accomplishing an important strategic and/ or operating goal. • Provocative: The pitch is counterintuitive and thus newsworthy. • Prudent: This is essential, or else the pitch is likely to have negative branding consequences. Bliss, J., & Wildrick, M. (2005). How to build a personal brand. Consulting to Management, 16(3), 6-10. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.gvsu.edu/docview/215901221?accountid= 39473 3 Steps- Develop YOUR Pitch
  23. 23. There exist many venues for communicating your message: • Bylined articles • Photography • Monetary contributions • Committee work • Board work • Op-eds • Books • White papers • Speeches • Panel discussions • Media interviews • Volunteering • Advocacy • Social media • Blogging Bliss, J., & Wildrick, M. (2005). How to build a personal brand. Consulting to Management, 16(3), 6-10. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.gvsu.edu/docview/215901221?accountid= 39473 3 Steps- ID your target platform
  24. 24. • The goal of personal brand building is simple: – To create a steady stream of original thought leadership that you can disperse to clients, prospects, and the business media. – You become uniquely qualified to achieve the objective of a professional in need. Bliss, J., & Wildrick, M. (2005). How to build a personal brand. Consulting to Management, 16(3), 6-10. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.gvsu.edu/docview/215901221?accountid= 39473 3 Steps- Purpose
  25. 25. • Relationship building and cultivation are fundamental for consideration of board positions. • A personal brand is our calling card in all aspects of career progression strategies. • We must benchmark ourselves to establish the best practices that link to our personal brand criteria metrics. 3 Steps- Deeper Purpose
  26. 26. • Personal brands are comprised of assets that contribute to the board development strategies we employ. The goal is to make sure the brand - you - gets noticed. • Serving on a board requires that how we are perceived can result in referrals to be considered for board appointments. • There are many characteristics contributing to a personal brand and are closely aligned with board development approaches. Leadership, Boards and Personal Brands Banks, S. (2012, Apr). Leverage your personal brand. Michigan Chronicle. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.gvsu.edu/docview/1013445531?accoun tid=39473
  27. 27. • Integrity: Social, intellectual, emotional and other attributes are among the core value characteristics consistent with honesty, trustworthiness, reliability and compassion that boards consider. Leadership, Boards and Personal Brands Banks, S. (2012, Apr). Leverage your personal brand. Michigan Chronicle. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.gvsu.edu/docview/1013445531?accountid=39473
  28. 28. • Leadership: Often businesses and initiatives don't fail on their own - lack of direction and leadership can be the culprits. – Boards are seeking leadership perspectives that can help establish policies, represent the organization and assist with strategic business planning implementation. Those who fail to treat leadership abilities as a priority simply cede opportunities to those who do. Leaders who don't embrace change will be replaced by those who do. We have all heard the sayings "Lead, follow, or get out of the way," and "Lead by example." – Our personal brand is consistent with board development that requires leaders with vision to help direct an organization. Leadership, Boards and Personal Brands Banks, S. (2012, Apr). Leverage your personal brand. Michigan Chronicle. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.gvsu.edu/docview/1013445531?account id=39473
  29. 29. • Commitment: Showing up when no one else does to do things no one else will often is a game changer that sets us apart. – Dedication to a vision and mission is critical to being a sought out or referred as a board candidate. The strongest argument for commitment is what happens when it is absent - very little. – Boards are seeking committed members who get things done. Leadership, Boards and Personal Brands Banks, S. (2012, Apr). Leverage your personal brand. Michigan Chronicle. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.gvsu.edu/docview/1013445531?accountid= 39473
  30. 30. • Persuasive: It is often said, many can draw a crowd, but not everyone can build a community or move people to action around a vision. – Those who are able to stimulate, encourage, support and convince are ahead of the curve to reach and engage organizations seeking board members. – Board development includes researching and understanding an organization's goals to help them achieve desired results. Leadership, Boards and Personal Brands Banks, S. (2012, Apr). Leverage your personal brand. Michigan Chronicle. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.gvsu.edu/docview/1013445531?accountid= 39473
  31. 31. • Discipline: Discipline is focused, not frivolous. – Discipline to do what is right and follow through may have you standing alone for awhile. – Lack of discipline will bring regret in the long-term. Identifying goals is a good thing; discipline to strive to achieve desired results is even better. Discipline is required as a function of our board development to aid achieving measurable outcomes to the organization. Leadership, Boards and Personal Brands Banks, S. (2012, Apr). Leverage your personal brand. Michigan Chronicle. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.gvsu.edu/docview/1013445531?accountid=39473
  32. 32. • Strategic Thinking: A good theory or idea is just that. It only becomes a fact when tested and proven. Research, analysis, assessment and evaluation are available tools for those seeking proof and validation through strategic planning processes. – Continuous improvement is what strategic thinkers do. – Board development includes being a strategic resource who can contribute information and perspectives. Leadership, Boards and Personal Brands Banks, S. (2012, Apr). Leverage your personal brand. Michigan Chronicle. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.gvsu.edu/docview/1013445531?accountid= 39473
  33. 33. • Team Builder: Effective teams function based on "what" is right being more important than "who" is right. – Those who can inspire as part of a team contribute to the goals and desired outcomes of an organization. – Team players are providing a critically important attribute that impacts every board's effectiveness. Leadership, Boards and Personal Brands Banks, S. (2012, Apr). Leverage your personal brand. Michigan Chronicle. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.gvsu.edu/docview/1013445531?accountid= 39473
  34. 34. • Creating a resource: – Potential employers – Board-seeking organizations – Alumni associations – Coworkers – Historical preservation • Confirms your qualifications at a glance • Decision-makers want to see proof of your skills and real examples of what you’ve done Toolkit/Portfolio
  35. 35. • Personal reflection statement • Personal & professional goals • Blueprint for success [action steps to fulfill personal and professional goals] • Education, training, competencies, professional skills • Demonstrated & documented proficiencies, professional & personal performance Toolkit/Portfolio- Contents
  36. 36. • What is your personal reflection statement? Include: Philosophy, Objectives, Strategies and Methodologies • Describe why you do what you do with a statement that reflects your personal philosophy on life. – What do find important? What gives you great satisfaction? – What are your career values? Your life values? Why? – What is your personality style? – What is your self-management style regarding risk-taking? What motivates you? – What are your career and life goals? What approaches do you use to achieve those accomplishments? ACTIVITY: Toolkit/Portfolio- Contents
  37. 37. • What is your leader brand? – Full blown thought (not a slogan or catch phrase) – No more than seven words – Expresses what followers FEEL will happen in their lives and in the world as a result of you, the leader – Share with partner – Share with group ACTIVITY: Toolkit/Portfolio- Contents
  38. 38. • What are your personal & professional goals? – Okay to organize in bullets – Be ready to make actionable [that’s next] – Share with partner ACTIVITY: Toolkit/Portfolio- Contents
  39. 39. • What’s your blueprint for success [action steps to fulfill personal and professional goals] – Okay to organize in bullets – These are ACTIONS you will take to fulfill the personal and professional goals listed earlier – Share with partner ACTIVITY: Toolkit/Portfolio- Contents
  40. 40. • What makes you qualified? • Education, training, competencies, professional skills • Better yet, where are the gaps you want to fill to fulfill your personal and professional goals? – Okay to organize in bullets – These are SKILLS you have or will get to fulfill the personal and professional goals listed earlier – Share with partner ACTIVITY: Toolkit/Portfolio- Contents
  41. 41. • How do you know? Who cares? • Demonstrated & documented proficiencies, professional & personal performance • Better yet, where are the gaps you want to fill to fulfill your personal and professional goals? – Okay to organize in bullets – These are METHODS you have been evaluated to prove you CAN or DID contribute • Awards, mentions and articles • Contributions and 3rd party endorsements – Share with partner ACTIVITY: Toolkit/Portfolio- Contents
  42. 42. • Start with a hook – When someone asks, "what do you do," start with a short statement designed to peak their curiosity. – This statement should be confusing and not lead the listener to any preconceived notion. It should not include any details about how you do what you do. – You don’t want this to sound made up or too contrived. ACTIVITY: Toolkit/Portfolio-The ANTI-Elevator Speech http://www.inc.com/marla-tabaka/fix-your-elevator-speech.html
  43. 43. • Stop talking – After you deliver your hook it's important to shut up. – Don't just do something, stand there. – You need to give the listener time to contemplate what you just said, get confused, and want to know more. ACTIVITY: Toolkit/Portfolio-The ANTI-Elevator Speech http://www.inc.com/marla-tabaka/fix-your-elevator-speech.html
  44. 44. • Reel them in – After a successful hook, don't launch into a sales pitch or commercial. Your hook does not give you permission to blast them between the eyes. – Ease into the next part of the Anti-Elevator Speech with the reel. – Begin to tell how you do what you do, but don't give away the show. Now you have earned the right to serve them. ACTIVITY: Toolkit/Portfolio-The ANTI-Elevator Speech http://www.inc.com/marla-tabaka/fix-your-elevator-speech.html
  45. 45. • Serve, don’t sell – Remain focused on your listener's needs, not on your needs. – The more you give to the world, the more the world gives back. ACTIVITY: Toolkit/Portfolio-The ANTI-Elevator Speech http://www.inc.com/marla-tabaka/fix-your-elevator-speech.html
  46. 46. • Analog – Portfolio provided – Table of contents with page numbers – Intro letter [change this per the opportunity] – MAKE COPIES and STORE A COPY IN THE CLOUD • Digital – Prezi 1: Digital Portfolios and Social Media Toolkit/Portfolio- Presentation: 2 ways

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