Evolution of Jung's Typology and the MBTI

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More than 100 years from the inception of Jung’s Psychological Type Theory and 70 years after the release of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, the Striving Styles Personality System is the next step in this evolutionary process. It is a complete assessment and development system that is based in the neurobiology of personality development. It incorporates the pioneering work of experts in brain functioning and development as well as emotional intelligence.
Like Myers & Briggs, another mother and daughter team, Anne Dranitsaris, Ph.D. and Heather Dranitsaris-Hilliard, have created the Striving Styles to show people the true mechanics of their minds, so they can direct how it functions and how they feel -- as Jung intended with his work!

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  • U.S. firms spent about $156 billion on employee learning in 2011, the most recent data available, according to the American Society for Training and Development. But with little practical follow-up or meaningful assessments, some 90% of new skills are lost within a year, some research suggests. Most organizations still consider training as an event Don’t distinguish between training & development events and programs Training and development programs that have expectations for participation within the context of their role, engagement with managers, peers and employees, and an appraisal and accountability strategy is a process that changes the brain
  • U.S. firms spent about $156 billion on employee learning in 2011, the most recent data available, according to the American Society for Training and Development. But with little practical follow-up or meaningful assessments, some 90% of new skills are lost within a year, some research suggests. Most organizations still consider training as an event Don’t distinguish between training & development events and programs Training and development programs that have expectations for participation within the context of their role, engagement with managers, peers and employees, and an appraisal and accountability strategy is a process that changes the brain
  • This is because these people live out of their rational brains The higher the education, the smarter people are, the higher position they hold in an organization the more they are given information instead of experiences Programs are customized so that facilitators don’t have to deal with resistance On the job training, skill building, apprenticeships, have the highest rate of success Development programs with follow up team and coaching modules with connections to HR systems most successful for leaders
  • Many people are able to sit and observe without actively participating
  • Many people are able to sit and observe without actively participating
  • Not designed for rote learning As we learn (as we experience, practice, process), specific dendrites grow so that specific neurons connect at specific synapses to create larger and more-complex specific neural networks. These networks are what we know. We change the brain during learning Practice makes us grow new circuits in the brain When we are focused and paying attention, we can change the brain
  • Not designed for rote learning As we learn (as we experience, practice, process), specific dendrites grow so that specific neurons connect at specific synapses to create larger and more-complex specific neural networks. These networks are what we know. We change the brain during learning Practice makes us grow new circuits in the brain When we are focused and paying attention, we can change the brain
  • Eight distinct Striving Styles – 2 for each function, 1 focused inward and 1 outward Each Style has predominant psychological need that must be met Based on location in brain, has unique talents and abilities to get its need met
  • Evolution of Jung's Typology and the MBTI

    1. 1. Striving Styles® PersonalitySystem~ The Next Evolution of Jung’s Typologyand the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator ~Anne Dranitsaris, Ph.D. & Heather Dranitsaris-HilliardCreators, Striving Styles Personality System
    2. 2. SSPS - Evolution of Jung & Myers-Briggs• The Striving Styles® Personality System is thethird step in the evolution of Jung’s psychologicaltype theory and its many applications• Builds on:– Jung’s typology;– psychometric assessment by Myers& Briggs; and– contributions of all of the practitioners to thebody of knowledge surrounding the MBTI®.PsychologicalTypeMBTISSPS
    3. 3. SSPS - Evolution of Jung & Myers-Briggs• More than 100 years from the inception ofJung’s Psychological Type Theory and 70 yearsafter the release of the Myers-Briggs TypeIndicator, the Striving Styles PersonalitySystem is the next step in this evolutionaryprocess• It is a complete assessment and developmentsystem that is based in the neurobiology ofpersonality development
    4. 4. SSPS - Evolution of Jung & Myers-Briggs• Integrates the work of top theorists of the 20th and21st centuries on:– Human brain development– Emotional intelligence– Neuroplasticity & other findings fromneuroscience• Shows how Jung’s psychological functions areembedded in our physiology and linked to ouremotions
    5. 5. Creators of the SSPS• Like Myers & Briggs, anothermother and daughter team, AnneDranitsaris, Ph.D. and HeatherDranitsaris-Hilliard, have createdthe Striving Styles• Help people understand how touse their whole brain and directhow it functions and how theyfeel -- as Jung intended with hiswork!
    6. 6. 3 Step Evolutionary Process• Step One: The Theory– Jung’s Psychological Type Theory• Step Two: The Assessment– Myers-Briggs Type Indicator• Step Three: The System– Striving Styles Personality System
    7. 7. Step One: The Theory• Psychological type theory developed by Carl Jung• Jung inferred that people operate from differentpsychological frameworks and orientations• Believed we have physiological, inbornpreferences for processing our experiencesand interacting with the world
    8. 8. Step One: The Theory• Identified four psychologicalfunctions by which we experiencethe world: sensation, intuition,feeling, and thinking• One of these four functions isdominant and used in either theextraverted or introverted attitude• Jung defined eight differentfunctional patterns of behavior, or“types” with predictable patternsof behavior
    9. 9. Step Two: The Assessment• Myers-Briggs Type Indicator is a psychometricquestionnaire designed to measure inborn,psychological preferences in how people gatherinformation & make decisions, inferred from Jung’stypology theory• Created by Isabel Briggs-Myers and her mother,Katherine Briggs in the early 1940s• MBTI was the first effective tool for sortingthe eight Jungian functions into most to leastfavorite
    10. 10. Step Two: The Assessment• Differences from Jung– MBTI added two new scales -Extroversion/ Introversion andJudging/Perceiving– Jung identified 8 psychological types;the MBTI identifies 16 personalitytypes– Jung incorporated the notion ofdevelopment and individuation;MBTI is solely a psychometricinstrument
    11. 11. Step Two: The Assessment• The body of research and writing that givescredibility to the MBTI is based on the ongoingcontributions of psychologists, consultants,coaches, trainers and facilitators who haveintegrated it into training and developmentprograms, counseling, career counseling,leadership, team and employee development,culture, etc.• The success of the MBTI isdependent upon their programs
    12. 12. Step Three: The System• The SSPS is a three-part developmental system that consistsof the following components:1. An Assessment for identifying how the brain is organizedbased on a four quadrant model; the predominant need;frequency of use of each of the functions; the equivalentJungian cognitive functions. Includes the SSPS DevelopmentWorkbook2. A Developmental Framework that focuses on strategiescentered on brain development and emotional maturation,and;3. A Roadmap for Development that identifies the specific stepsto take to change behavior and re-pattern the brain.
    13. 13. Step Three: The System• SSPS is a complete system for achieving potential whichshows:– how the brain is organized– how needs and emotions influence behavior– how to break free of patterns of behaviors that limitdevelopment and growth– how to access and use all natural abilities andinclinations rooted in our brains,– how to strengthen the authentic self throughremapping the brain and satisfying the predominantneedSSPS Introductory Webinar, Page 13Copyright 2010 Striving Styles (SKE Inc.)
    14. 14. About the Striving Styles• Based on the assertion that each of us is born with apredominant need and pattern of energy (Striving Style) thatdetermines how we will behave in order to get that need met• Sheds light on the mechanics of the mind and what we cando to help us achieve our potential as human beings• Provides people with a ‘user’s manual’ andstep-by-step approach to development basedon their own brain organizationCopyright 2010 Striving Styles (SKE Inc.)
    15. 15. About the Striving Styles• Powerful tool for anyone involved in:– Behavioral Change– Performance Management– Selection & Retention– Leadership or Team Development– Organizational Effectiveness & Change Facilitation– Therapy, Counselling or Coaching– Personal or Professional GrowthSSPS Introductory Webinar, Page 15Copyright 2010 Striving Styles (SKE Inc.)
    16. 16. Key Components of the SSPSInnate Psychological Needs4 Quadrants of the Brain8 Striving StylesStriving Style SquadSelf-Protective & Self-Actualizing Systems of the BrainSSPS Development Framework
    17. 17. Step Three: The System• Four quadrants of the brain are meantto work in an integrated fashion -‘Striving Style Squad’• SSPS teaches how to use all fourfunctions and helps people:– recognize what quadrant of thebrain they are acting from– know how to shift to otherfunctions when necessary– learn where their PredominantStyle is located in the brain andwhat types of activities it is orientedtoward
    18. 18. Key Components of the SSPS• Driven by powerful innate psychological needs• Our behavior seeks to get theseneeds met• Hard-wired at birth• Source of all motivation andsocial interactionCopyright 2010 Striving Styles (SKE Inc.)INNATEPSYCHOLOGICALNEEDS
    19. 19. Key Components of the SSPSSSPS Qualifying Program Module 1, Page 19Copyright 2010 Striving Styles (SKE Inc.)Thinking FunctionSensing FunctionIntuitive FunctionFeeling Function
    20. 20. Key Components of the SSPSCopyright 2010 Striving Styles (SKE Inc.)
    21. 21. Key Components of the SSPS
    22. 22. • Have access to the strivingenergies of four ‘people’ - StrivingStyle Squad• Each plays a different role in yourpersonality based on location inthe brain• One Style or need will be the“alpha”, and dominates the othersas the Predominant Striving Style• One Style will be ‘2IC’Key Components of the SSPSCopyright 2010 Striving Styles (SKE Inc.)
    23. 23. • Four styles on Squad designedto work together• To self-actualize, must useyour brain as a wholeleveraging all of the Squad• Key is to not use members ofthe Squad for roles they werenot designed to performKey Components of the SSPSCopyright 2010 Striving Styles (SKE Inc.)
    24. 24. Key Components of the SSPSCopyright 2010 Striving Styles (SKE Inc.)
    25. 25. Key Components of the SSPSSelf-Actualizing vs. Self-Protective Behaviors of thePerformer Style
    26. 26. SSPS Level I AssessmentCopyright 2010 Striving Styles (SKE Inc.)
    27. 27. Roadmap for Development• Gives you a clear, step-by-step approachto:– Breaking instinctual patterns ofbehavior that get in the way– Shifting from self-protectiveto self-actualizing behavior– Leveraging the Striving StyleSquad to achieve potentialKey Components of the SSPSCopyright 2010 Striving Styles (SKE Inc.)
    28. 28. • Our DevelopmentalFramework is based onemotional maturation andbrain development• Includes 5 Building Blocksto Achieving Potential• Participants receive theSSPS DevelopmentWorkbook - series ofexercises for each step ofthe detailed roadmapKey Components of the SSPSCopyright 2010 Striving Styles (SKE Inc.)
    29. 29. Resources for Individuals andPractitioners
    30. 30. Full Suite of Products• SSPS Level I Assessment & Report• Core Reports: General Style & Leveraging YourSquad• Application Reports: Leadership, Work Style,Career Style, Relationship Style, Parenting &Child, Learning Style• Reference Reports: Maximizing LeaderPotential, Team Potential & Employee Potential• Roadmap & Development Workbook• Who Are You Meant To Be? BookCopyright 2010 Striving Styles (SKE Inc.)
    31. 31. - Receive all the training you need to use this powerful framework inyour development programs or for personal growth- Access to specialized resources, application & marketing support- Discounts on all products – assessments, reports, webinars – of50%- Ability to administer assessments and products to clients throughour SSPS Practitioner Portal- Current promotion provides Practitioners with 10 free assessments($250 value) upon qualificationBecoming an SSPS PractitionerCopyright 2010 Striving Styles (SKE Inc.)
    32. 32. Becoming an SSPS Practitioner• 19 e-learning modules available through our sitewww.StrivingStyles.com for $475• NEW PROMOTION: MBTI Fast Track Live Webinar Program – or in-person+ webinar program – either only $475• On-line test is administered upon completion; must score 80% tobecome Qualified• Participants must complete the Level I Assessment & read theGeneral Report on their Predominant Style as well as LeveragingYour Squad in advanceNo te: applicable taxes are in additio n Copyright 2010 Striving Styles (SKE Inc.)
    33. 33. Want to Learn More?• Download ourEvolution of Jung’s Typology White Paper• Attend a SSPS webinar• Take the SSPS and experience the difference for yourself• Become a SSPS Practitioner by taking one of ourQualifying Programs• Contact us directly at heather@strivingstyles.com orvisit our site – www.StrivingStyles.comCopyright 2010 Striving Styles (SKE Inc.)
    34. 34. Copyright 2010 Striving Styles (SKE Inc.)

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