Creativity's Diversity Disconnect

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- We surveyed 750 U.S. creatives from different backgrounds to understand their perceptions of diversity and inclusion in education and the workplace. We also spoke to 10 thought leaders from the creative industry, community and in education to get their unique perspectives. Read more and share your own actions using #CreativityforAll. For more information, check out our blog post: https://blogs.adobe.com/creativecloud/building-the-case-for-diversity/

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Creativity's Diversity Disconnect

  1. 1. Creativity’s Diversity Disconnect NOVEMBER 2017
  2. 2. RESEARCH PURPOSE Diversity and inclusion are important issues that affect many industries, including the creative field. As a partner and contributor to the creative community, we’d like to understand how race and gender impact creative professionals in their education and careers. PRIOR INDUSTRY RESEARCH Our work builds on studies that shed light on the composition and advancement of creatives in different industries. Examples include the 2008 “Artists in the Workforce” study by the National Endowment of the Arts and AIGA’s 2016 Design Census, which provide foundational benchmarking for the gender and ethnic/racial demographics. Our observations are: • Women enter the creative field in comparable numbers to men but don’t advance at the same pace. • People of color run into challenges in the workplace relative to entry and advancement. Introduction OUR COMMITMENT Our hope is that the insights from our study will help build awareness, amplify the conversation, and provide a basis for action in education and the workplace for women and people of color. This research is just the beginning. We view it as the start of the conversation and we will continue to build on this body of work through additional discussions and partnerships, as well as our own work with the creative community. CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 1. INTRODUCTION, METHODOLOGY & KEY FINDINGS 2
  3. 3. U.S. creative industry professionals U.S. creative industry professionals, educators, and community leaders ±3.6% at the 95% confidence level** MARGIN OF ERROR N=750* N=150 photographers N=150 videographers N=150 designers SAMPLE SIZE N=10 15-minute online survey METHOD 45- to 60-minute phone interview Survey fielded from August 29 to September 5, 2017 TIMING Calls occurred between September 25 and October 4, 2017 *Note: The additional job titles represented in our study include architects, creative directors, art directors, animators, web / app developers, etc. **Unless otherwise noted, differences between audiences are statistically significant at the 95% confidence level Research methodology QUANTITATIVE SURVEY QUALITATIVE INTERVIEWS AUDIENCE CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 1. INTRODUCTION, METHODOLOGY & KEY FINDINGS 3
  4. 4. RICK ALBANO Executive Creative Director, SWIFT LIZ DANZICO Chair, MFA Interaction Design, SVA RIC EDWARDS Creative Director, NA Collective KATHLEEN DIAMANTAKIS Chief Strategy Development Officer, KBS & Co-Founder, On Behalf Organization SHAMEKABROWNBARBOSA Creative Director/Writer and Entrepreneur, The Brown Scribe GINA GRILLO CEO, President, The Advertising Club of New York ASH HUANG UX Designer, Adobe JACINDA WALKER Diversity Task Force Chair, AIGA IAN SPALTER Head of Design, Instagram JON HINOJOSA Artistic/Executive Director, SAY Sí Qualitative interview participants We’d like to thank the following people for sharing their experience and insights to help us better understand the survey findings.* *Quotes in this report are personal opinions of the interviewees and do not reflect the views of the company and organizations they work for or are affiliated with.CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 1. INTRODUCTION, METHODOLOGY & KEY FINDINGS 4
  5. 5. Survey: Key findings Diversity drives success and better work, yet progress lags. • Eighty-two percent of creatives believe their most successful group projects were produced by a diverse team. Page 10 • Seventy-six percent report they will avoid working for/with a company they believe does not take diversity seriously. Page 11 • Eighty-seven percent say a diverse workforce should be an industry priority. Page 12 • A vast majority (90 percent) agrees a more diverse workforce is only effective if everyone feels included. Page 12 • Yet, only about half of respondents (54 percent) believe diversity in the creative industry has gotten better, compared to five years ago. Page 13 MAKING THE CASE FOR DIVERSITY CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 1. INTRODUCTION, METHODOLOGY & KEY FINDINGS 5
  6. 6. Survey: Key findings Creative careers are out of reach for many people of color. • Lack of awareness of creative professions is a barrier. Page 16 • Creatives of color are twice as likely to perceive a lack of access to tools and training as a significant barrier. Page 17 • Parents and mentors of students of color are perceived as being less likely to be very supportive of a creative education. Page 18 • Fewer creatives of color graduate with a creative major compared to white respondents. Page 19 * This section focuses mainly on perceptions among people of color around their awareness and exposure to the creative profession. We also analyzed responses by gender and found many similarities in experience and barriers that men and women face overall. While differences exist in individual cases, overall this lines up with broader industry data that indicates that there is a robust pipeline for female creatives. CREATIVES OF COLOR START AT AN UNEVEN PLAYING FIELD* CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 1. INTRODUCTION, METHODOLOGY & KEY FINDINGS 6
  7. 7. Survey: Key findings Bias and exclusion stall women and people of color in their career progression. • Creatives of color are more likely to report experiencing career barriers and are less likely to say that people they work with value their contributions. Pages 22 & 23 • Women are less likely than men to report seeing people like themselves in their industry and at work. Page 24 • Women are also more likely to say their gender will hamper their future success. Page 26 A STEEP CLIMB CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 1. INTRODUCTION, METHODOLOGY & KEY FINDINGS 7
  8. 8. Making the case for diversity Diversity drives success and better work, yet progress lags. CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT, PART TWO “As designers, we are at the forefront of what people see and how they sell their products. If the design is not inclusive, we are manifesting a world where people will not have a meritocracy.” ASH HUANG, UX DESIGNER, ADOBE 8
  9. 9. I could tell right away that there was no one who looked like me in the room when they were making creative decisions. So now that I’m able to bring in different viewpoints, it just makes our story better.” RIC EDWARDS, CREATIVE DIRECTOR, NA COLLECTIVE “ CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 2. MAKING THE CASE FOR DIVERSITY 9
  10. 10. My most successful group projects or initiatives were produced by a diverse team Without a more diverse workforce, the creative industry won’t advance at the speed it could STATEMENT AGREEMENT (Top 2 box) “When you’re in environments where people from all over the world, different cultures, and walks of life are working on a problem together, that’s pretty inspiring. It’s like the super-hero team-ups.” IAN SPALTER, HEAD OF DESIGN, INSTAGRAM Q20: How much do you agree or disagree with the following statements? Base size: Total = 750 82% 78% Creatives see diversity as core to industry success and advancement CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 2. MAKING THE CASE FOR DIVERSITY 10
  11. 11. of creative professionals report they will avoid working for/with a company that they believe does not take diversity seriously STATEMENT AGREEMENT (Top 2 box) Q20: How much do you agree or disagree with the following statements? Base size: Total = 750 76% Creatives make diversity a factor in career and project decisions CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 2. MAKING THE CASE FOR DIVERSITY 11
  12. 12. agree a more diverse workforce is only effective if everyone feels included say a diverse workforce should be a priority for the creative industry Q20: How much do you agree or disagree with the following statements? Base size: Total = 750 Q19: How much of a priority do you think a diverse workforce should be for the creative industry? Base size: Total = 750 90%87% A vast majority agrees diversity is a priority and only effective with inclusion STATEMENT AGREEMENT (Top 2 box selected) STATEMENT AGREEMENT (Top 2 box selected) CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 2. MAKING THE CASE FOR DIVERSITY 12
  13. 13. COMPARED TO FIVE YEARS AGO, DIVERSITY IN THE CREATIVE INDUSTRY WORKFORCE IS… (% selecting) Q23: Compared to five years ago, do you think the diversity in the creative industry workforce is…? Base size: Total = 750 7% 39%54% Getting better About the same Getting worse Yet, only half of respondents think the creative industry is more diverse than it was five years ago “Diversity is very important, but I don’t think we’re there yet. The industry is changing but it’s not changing fast enough.” RICK ALBANO, EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR, SWIFT CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 2. MAKING THE CASE FOR DIVERSITY 13
  14. 14. Creatives of color start at an uneven playing field Creative careers are out of reach for many people of color CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT, PART THREE “My high school did not have any facilities or experts for creative. I didn’t know there were careers like art directors or that advertising was a major.” KATHLEEN DIAMANTAKIS, CHIEF STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT OFFICER, KBS & CO-FOUNDER, ON BEHALF ORGANIZATION This section focuses mainly on perceptions among people of color around their awareness and exposure to the creative profession. We also analyzed responses by gender and found many similarities in experience and barriers that men and women face overall. While differences exist in individual cases, overall this lines up with broader industry data that indicates that there is a robust pipeline for female creatives. 14
  15. 15. We are actively trying to pursue younger people at different stages of their creative life. We are trying to talk to people well before middle school and high school to start educating people about what design means.” LIZ DANZICO, CHAIR, MFA INTERACTION DESIGN, SVA “ “ Opportunities for young people in visual arts in their public schools were fairly non-existent when we started SAY Sí. Fast-forward 23 years later, and it’s even worse. One reason is budgetary confinements and restrictions; the other piece is not understanding the value and the importance of the arts.” JON HINOJOSA, ARTISTIC/EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, SAY Sí CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 3. PEOPLE OF COLOR START AT A DISADVANTAGE 15
  16. 16. Creatives cite lack of awareness as a barrier BARRIERS TO PURSUING CREATIVE EDUCATION (Top 2 box) Q8: To what extent do you consider each of the following to have been a barrier to pursuing your creative education? Base sizes: Total creatives who pursued a creative major after high school = 361, People of Color who pursued a creative major after high school = 101 51%say “lack of awareness of creative professions” is a barrier to a creative education Fifty-five percent of creatives of color cite lack of awareness as a barrier CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 3. PEOPLE OF COLOR START AT A DISADVANTAGE 16
  17. 17. [ ] Lack of tools and training is also considered a barrier Q8: To what extent do you consider each of the following to have been a barrier to pursuing your creative education? (Top 2 box selected) Base sizes: White who pursued a creative major after high school = 260, People of Color who pursued a creative major after high school = 101 2xCreatives of color are two times more likely than white creatives to cite lack of access to tools and training as a significant barrier. White People of color 13% 27% CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 3. PEOPLE OF COLOR START AT A DISADVANTAGE 17
  18. 18. Students of color are less likely to have a strong support network *Note: difference between audiences is statistically significant at the 90% confidence level Q5: Thinking about the people in your life, how supportive were they during your pursuit of your creative profession? Base sizes: White = 494, People of Color = 254 Parents* Mentor(s) LEVEL OF SUPPORT (% selecting “Very supportive”) “There was a perception that you had to get a real job and that a real job never included being something creative. Being happy at a career was not something that was a priority, being black and coming from a large family of working class people.” JACINDA WALKER, AIGA DIVERSITY TASK FORCE CHAIR 71% 65% 63% 54% White People of color CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 3. PEOPLE OF COLOR START AT A DISADVANTAGE 18
  19. 19. Fewer respondents of color graduated with a creative major Q3: Did you graduate with a creative major after your education post-high school? Note that this includes your primary major or a double major. Base sizes: White who attended education beyond high school= 454, People of Color who attended education beyond high school= 227 Q8: To what extent do you consider each of the following to have been a barrier to pursuing your creative education? Base sizes: White who pursued creative major after high school= 260, People of Color who pursued creative major after high school = 101 White WhitePeople of color People of color 57% 44% 37% 54% GRADUATED WITH A CREATIVE MAJOR (% selecting “Yes”) BARRIERS TO PURSUING A CREATIVE EDUCATION “Difficulty getting accepted into the program or classes I wanted” (Top 2 box) CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 3. PEOPLE OF COLOR START AT A DISADVANTAGE 19
  20. 20. A steeper climb Bias and exclusion stall women and people of color in their career progression CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT, PART FOUR “The sink-or-swim nature of the business is what’s maddening to me, because no amount of training as an intern can really even prepare you for what you’re walking into. And if you add in race, gender, sexuality, religion, the climb just becomes even steeper.” SHAMEKA BROWN BARBOSA, CREATIVE DIRECTOR/WRITER AND ENTREPRENEUR, THE BROWN SCRIBE 20
  21. 21. I heard it as a kid and definitely heard from my mom that as a minority, especially as a minority woman, I would have to work twice as hard to get noticed. For me, that was just how life is. So I always tried to work really hard, and figured hard work would compensate for everything.” ASH HUANG, UX DESIGNER, ADOBE “ CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 4. A STEEPER CLIMB 21
  22. 22. Creatives of color are more likely to report experiencing career barriers than white creatives BARRIERS TO ACHIEVING CAREER GOALS (Top 2 Box) Q13: To what extent would you consider each of the following to be a barrier to achieving your career goals over the next two years? Base sizes: White = 494, People of Color = 254 66% 75% 53% 65% White People of color 51% 63% 49% 62% Finding new opportunities Lack of sponsorship from a senior-level advocate Lack of support from my management Pressure to speak up or behave in ways that are uncomfortable ACROSS ALL RESPONDENTS Women and men perceive similar career barriers. Those who did not graduate with a creative major are more likely to experience career barriers than those who did graduate with a creative major. CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 4. A STEEPER CLIMB 22
  23. 23. …and are less likely to feel valued at work STATEMENT AGREEMENT (% selecting “Strongly agree”) *Note: difference between audiences is statistically significant at the 90% confidence level Q10: How much do you agree or disagree with the following statements? Base sizes: White = 494, People of Color = 254 I can be myself at work* People I work with value my contributions 70% 63% White People of color 63% 55% CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 4. A STEEPER CLIMB 23
  24. 24. Women notice a lack of female creatives at work and in leadership *Both genders are equally likely to seek more senior roles. - Q12: What are your career ambitions over the next two years? % selecting yes: 42% men vs. 43% women Q18: How much do you agree or disagree with the following statements? Base sizes: Men = 362, Women = 385 There are many other people like me in my industry There are many other people like me at my company / the companies I freelance for There are many people like me in leadership roles at my company / the companies I do freelance work for* 83% 74% 74% 65% Men Women 73% 62% STATEMENT AGREEMENT (Top 2 box) CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 4. A STEEPER CLIMB 24
  25. 25. Even in my first job, there was one black man in the creative department of about 120 people. Soon after I arrived, he was promoted to the digital side and moved to another floor. I was like, ‘My god, I’m literally by myself.’ There was no one in front of me to model or watch.” SHAMEKA BROWN BARBOSA, CREATIVE DIRECTOR/WRITER AND ENTREPRENEUR, THE BROWN SCRIBE “ If you’re in an organization and you don’t see people like you at the top, it’s intimidating, it’s very hard to navigate that.” “ GINA GRILLO, CEO, PRESIDENT, THE ADVERTISING CLUB OF NEW YORKCREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 4. A STEEPER CLIMB 25
  26. 26. Women are more likely to feel gender will negatively impact future success Q25: When you think about your future career success, how do you view the role of your gender? Base sizes: Men = 362, Women = 385 I believe my gender will help my future success I believe my gender will hamper my future success 29% 20% 14% 23% Men Women ROLE OF GENDER IN FUTURE CAREER SUCCESS (% selecting) “As a black woman, I am very confident that I do not have an equal opportunity to reach my goals.” JACINDA WALKER, AIGA DIVERSITY TASK FORCE CHAIR“I think it is an advantage to be a man in this industry. There are certain cases where you’re like, ‘Wow, he’s listening harder to the guy.’” RICK ALBANO, EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR, SWIFT CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 4. A STEEPER CLIMB 26
  27. 27. Time for action Recommendations from our experts CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT, PART FIVE “ “The future is about creativity. It starts with valuing creativity in education, building the creativity of young people and harnessing that from the youngest age all the way through.” IAN SPALTER, HEAD OF DESIGN, INSTAGRAM Teaching people ways that they can look at the world as an opportunity for change, and for design to be a method or a force for that change—it’s a better way to change the world.” LIZ DANZICO, CHAIR, MFA INTERACTION DESIGN, SVA VALUE CREATIVE EDUCATION FOR DIVERSE STUDENTS RETHINK HOW STUDENTS LEARN AND APPLY CREATIVE SKILLS I’d like the public education system to rethink their approach to the different ways that students learn.” JON HINOJOSA, ARTISTIC/EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, SAY Sí Exposure is great but if you can’t follow it with access to creative classes, what do you have? Nothing. And vice versa.” JACINDA WALKER, AIGA DIVERSITY TASK FORCE CHAIR “ “ CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 5. TIME FOR ACTION 27
  28. 28. “ We have something called a passive candidate pipeline. Even if the roles aren’t open, we try to have diverse people coming in because we believe in unexpected destinations.” RICK ALBANO, EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR, SWIFT  BROADEN RECRUITMENT BEYOND “CREATIVE HUBS” SEEK OUT DIVERSE CANDIDATES INVEST IN DIVERSE EMPLOYEES Companies need to go to those places that are forgotten because not all students can afford to come to them.” RIC EDWARDS, CREATIVE DIRECTOR, NA COLLECTIVE It can’t just be that you hire somebody and think you’ve done enough. You have people in your company who represent different groups and backgrounds. Invest in those people.” GINA GRILLO, CEO, PRESIDENT OF THE ADVERTISING CLUB OF NEW YORK “ “ Women need to see more examples of people who look like them. That’s something that women and people of color can help with, especially if they’re in a position of power.” ASH HUANG, UX DESIGNER, ADOBE Homogeneity is the death knell, because you need a counterpoint.” SHAMEKA BROWN BARBOSA, CREATIVE DIRECTOR/WRITER AND ENTREPRENEUR, THE BROWN SCRIBE GROW ROLE MODELS AT WORK MAKE EVERYONE A DIVERSITY CHAMPION “ “It’s hard to be ‘that diversity person.’ We need more people to speak out.” KATHLEEN DIAMANTAKIS, CHIEF STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT OFFICER, KBS & CO-FOUNDER, ON BEHALF ORGANIZATION “CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 5. TIME FOR ACTION 28
  29. 29. Appendix Socioeconomic background and age CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT, PART SIX 29
  30. 30. 65% vs. 1 in 6 from an upper socio-economic background CREATIVE NETWORK (% selecting) respondents from a lower socio-economic background has no one in their personal life who works or has worked in the creative industry among those from an upper socio-economic background among those from a lower socio-economic background AVERAGE LEVEL OF SUPPORT FROM PEOPLE IN THEIR LIVES DURING PURSUIT OF CREATIVE PROFESSION (Average ‘Very supportive’ scores across all response options) [ ] Socio-economic background impacts exposure to creative industry Q4: Which of the following people in your life, if any, work in the creative industry (or previously worked in the creative industry)? Q5: Thinking about the people in your life, how supportive were they during your pursuit of your creative profession? Base sizes: Upper socio-economic background = 422, Lower socio-economic background = 328 56% 1 in 4 CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 6. APPENDIX 30
  31. 31. PERSONAL STRENGTHS (Top 2 box) Q15: And how much of a strength would you say each of these are for you personally at this point in your creative career? Base sizes: Upper socio-economic background = 346, Lower socio-economic background = 263 Those with upper socio-economic backgrounds feel they have stronger networks and visibility 93% 77% 88% 74% Upper socio-economic background Lower socio-economic background Network of colleagues / co-workers Industry visibility CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 6. APPENDIX 31
  32. 32. 79% 73% Millenials (18-36) Gen X (37-50) Baby Boomers (51+) 46% 79% 75% 55% 77% 67% 36% 76% 70% 51% 74% 70% 50% 72% 67% 40% 72% 69% 36% 70% 63% 31% TYPES OF PEOPLE UNDERREPRESENTED IN THE CREATIVE INDUSTRY (Top 2 box) Younger generations are more likely to perceive diversity gaps... People from different cultures People from different gender expressions People of different races/ ethnicities People of different genders People of different religions People of different sexual orientations People with different perspectives / viewpoints People from different socio-economic background Q21: How much do you agree or disagree that each of the following types of people is underrepresented in the creative industry today? Base sizes: Millennials (18-36) = 436, Gen X (37-50) = 195, Baby Boomers (51+) = 119 CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 6. APPENDIX 32
  33. 33. PRIORITY OF A DIVERSE WORKFORCE (% selecting) ...and consider diversity a top priority 10% 46% 44% 9% 53% 38% 29% 39% 32% Not a priority Somewhat of a priority A significant priority Millennials (18–36) Gen X (37–50) Baby Boomers (51+) Q19: How much of a priority do you think a diverse workforce should be for the creative industry? Base sizes: Millennials (18-36) = 436, Gen X (37-50) = 195, Baby Boomers (51+) = 119 CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 6. APPENDIX 33
  34. 34. CATEGORY SUBCATEGORY % White only 66% Net: People of color* 34% White 74% African or African descent 11% Hispanic 11% Asian American/Asian 10% Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander 2% American Indian or Alaska Native 3% Middle Eastern 1% Other 2% Wealthy 15% Upper middle class 41% Lower middle class 37% Lower income 7% Demographics CATEGORY SUBCATEGORY % Gender Male 48% Female 51% Non-binary/third gender 0% Other 0% Age 18-24 13% 25-34 36% 35-49 34% 50-64 14% 65 or older 3% Education Less than high school 0% High school graduate 9% Vocational/technical 4% Some college 11% College graduate 46% Some graduate education 11% Postgraduate degree 19% *Note: People of Color respondents are defined as anyone who is not white only. Some total values may not add up exactly to 100% due to rounding Family income level while growing up Race/ethnicity (audiences reported) Race/ethnicity (natural fallout; multiple answers allowed) CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 6. APPENDIX 34
  35. 35. A big thanks to Adobe’s creative teams for sharing their pictures as part of our cover design. CREATIVITY’S DIVERSITY DISCONNECT 6. APPENDIX 35

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