Asking Better Questions in Social Media

2,049 views

Published on

NZTE Beachheads Presentation

Video links:

Gary V: The Thank You Economy: How Business Must Adapt to Social Media
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2UkiM3OaHxw

Air New Zealand - How we are using Social Media
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYio3AriQcA

The Volkswagen Beetle. Juiced Up
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KRA0SZhKNyo

Published in: Technology, Business
3 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Thanks, Fletcher Bowley (UK Sales Manager FPG Ltd / www.fpgworld.com) - glad you enjoyed! Seriously though, enjoyed your question at the end about the personal/professional separation. Speak soon
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Great presentation Adele. It was interesting to get a different insight into the world of Social Media from someone who clearly understands how to use it effectively. I'm beginning to see what a crucial tool and resource it is to help build our brand and promote our products and services online. Thanks, Fletcher Bowley (UK Sales Manager FPG Ltd / www.fpgworld.com)
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Video links:
    Gary V: The Thank You Economy: How Business Must Adapt to Social Media
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2UkiM3OaHxw

    Air New Zealand - How we are using Social Media
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYio3AriQcA

    The Volkswagen Beetle. Juiced Up
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KRA0SZhKNyo
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,049
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
85
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
3
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • [INTRODUCTION – social media not something to be scared of, more about social and strategic skills than it is about technical skills]
  • Just over ten years ago, some people still weren't sure if the Internet was a fad - now, it has become a utility, just like electricity or water. This graph shows Forrester’s prediction for online marketing spends, and shows that social media and mobile will be the hottest, but that everything will see an upward trend. We're currently in Web 2.0 - when the Internet becomes about interaction, and soon, we'll be in Web 3.0 - which is about the semantic web and personalisation. Social media won't just be about marketing, or customer service, it will represent a mode in which all areas of business operations take place.
  • Dave is the CEO of a 30-person company. They’re B2B as well as B2C – they sell toilet paper (a decidedly unsexy product).
  • Emily is in her mid-twenties, and has been a marketing manager for a couple of years – she uses Facebook, Twitter, and Linkedin daily. She hates the organisation’s website, and can’t believe that they don’t have a Facebook page.
  • One day – Dave is at some kind of conference where social media is mentioned. He hears some mind-blowing statistics.
  • •There are over 200,000,000 Blogs•78% of consumers trust peer recommendations•Only 14% trust advertisements•81% of Generation Y use Facebook daily.
  • •There are over 200,000,000 Blogs•78% of consumers trust peer recommendations•Only 14% trust advertisements•81% of Generation Y use Facebook daily.
  • Took radio 38 years to reach 50 million listeners. Terrestrial TV took 13 years to reach 50 million users. The internet took four years to reach 50 million people... In less than nine months, Facebook added 100 million users. 
  • Dave worries that his company “isn’t keeping up” – he fears that if his company doesn’t “do something” then they will be left behind in the late majority category. So he goes and tells Emily that she needs to come up with some kind of social media campaign and tells her that she can present her ideas to him on Monday.
  • Emily goes home and gets excited. She thinks about Facebook campaigns, she’s got her brainstorming hat on. But as she looks down at her ideas, she realizes that to push them through, they all require extra resource. And how do you get resource? By making promises that those resources are going to deliver results. And how can she promise that? What worked for one company might not work for hers. How does she convince Dave that this is worth the investment?
  • On Monday, Dave’s meeting with Emily rolls around. Emily says to him: I know what you want me to answer. How can social media win us new business leads? How can we justify the ROI? And she says – I can’t give you an answer to those because I think they’re the wrong questions.
  • On Monday, Dave’s meeting with Emily rolls around. Emily says to him: I know what you want me to answer. How can social media win us new business leads? How can we justify the ROI? And she says – I can’t give you an answer to those because I think they’re the wrong questions.
  • Within social media – various aspects.
  • Interruption marketing is when you’re reading a magazine, or watching your favorite TV show, and then get interrupted by an ad for a new car or laundry powder. This approach won't work, as there is SO much content being uploaded to the net – on Facebook, more than 30bn pieces of content is shared each month, which is an average of 7bn pieces a week. Seth Godin talks about how in a world full of so much noise, interruption marketing won't win. What wins is permission marketing. Customers who seek you out. Customers who don't just buy your products and therefore appreciate your organisation - customers who buy into your organisation and therefore buy your products.
  • Kristen Boschma is Head of Online Communications and Social Media for Telstra. Shesaid marketing in the 80s was all about the product, and then it moved into the “new marketing” era which was about “you deserve this car because you are amazing” and now we are in the era of “us marketing”.
  • Emily tries to phrase this delicately. She says – it’s not about us just launching a Facebook page – because who’s going to manage it? Who’s going to reply to all the questions we get? Are we going to use it for customer service, or for outreach? How are things around here going to change, where is resource going to be shifted to? She feels like she’s trying to explain a different culture, a different set of beliefs, but she starts talking about the questions Dave is asking, and the questions that they actually should be asking.
  • Dave asks: what can social media do for us? How can we win leads? How can we increase sales?
  • Emily knows that you can’t SELL through social media. Sales is about building a relationship and then being able to launch a conversation off of that relationship. (HBR study on relationship builders vs. challengers) Building relationships starts with asking what we can give.
  • For example, Mr Vintage is a t-shirt brand, stocking 80s theme and pop culture t-shirts. It opened in 2004 and decide to giveaway hourly tee shirt prizes valued at $100 plus one trip for two people to Fiji. The primary target was 18-35s who use a computer daily and use Facebook and Twitter. They wanted to communicate that they were a New Zealand premium t-shirt brand. Previously, they'd had good results online. They set a goal if increasing FB fans by 500 and generating 1500 unique email registrations at a cost per acquisition less than what they realised on other activities.
  • They used a New Zealand developed web-based application call Spreadit - where they ran a 24-hour internet promotion giving away tee shirt packages with $100 value every hour and a major prize of a trip to Fiji for two people by registering on the competition page and opting to receive ongoing correspondence. The entrants chose between writing status updates on Twitter, becoming a fan of the official Mr Vintage FB page or sending out emails to their friends to promote the competition. Spreadit would automatically track each user's activity and select a winner every hour based on their actions. The campaign ran from Tuesday 7th July 2009 to Wednesday 8th July.
  • At the end of the 2 day campaign
  • At the end of the 2 day campaign
  • At the end of the 2 day campaign
  • At the end of the 2 day campaign
  • The woman who won the trip was in her mid-thirties, had never been overseas, had three kids, and had just lost 60kgs. As she ended up taking the whole family overseas (paying extra for the kids) – this made a great human interest story: because of twitter, Mr. Vintage was able to get the winner on National TV, on the main morning and evening talk shows in New Zealand.
  • But if you look under the hood - you see it's because of Rob, their CEO.
  • And Jay – their marketing manager.
  • Rob lets Jay etc do what they want on blog (sample) - relinquish control. Jay is the heart of Mr V's social media, and Rob recognizes that. Jay is hilarious - he's funny, customers warm to him. They love the t-shirts too, but most of all, they respond to Jay's voice -it's an authentic company. Authenticity, narrative and transparency are what people respond to. Notice the way in which they speak to their customers – it’s a distinctive voice.
  • Which is why their ration of Likes to “people talking about them” is so high. The difficulty is – when people see this, they think – oh okay, we can use Spreadit as a tool, sure - but that doesn't mean you'll get the same results that Mr Vintage did - because Mr Vintage has the kind of culture that allows them to have a blog that talks about beer and sex - and a Facebook page likethis. They're very human. Very authentic. That appeals to the demographic they're going for- it fits in with their brand as a cool, young company. Some organisations are aiming for that. Many aren't. The important thing is to talk like your customer. There are luxury brands whose point of difference or personality is the exact opposite of Mr Vintage, like Burberry, whose case study we’ll also look at. The important thing is knowing your customers, how they think, and becoming friends with them through your social media.
  • The next question Dave had been asking Emily was: what should we be saying?
  • Instead – it’s about what THEY (your customers) are saying, and how you respond.
  • Emily jumped straight to the context of the Obama campaign. The Obama campaign was contending with established players that had far greater resourcesThere were few alternatives to putting emerging social media technology and processes in the front lines of the contest (they were desperate)The campaign had little chance of success if it had only used tried-and-true processesObama was not on the radar screen at first because he didn’t look like a serious contender according to traditional metricsBy using the technology, the Obama campaign was able to engage customers in fundamentally new waysCustomers (voters) used the same technology to amplify the effect
  • 3 million donors made a total of 6.5 million donations online adding up to more than $500 million. Why were people involved? Hope and change – a better world – an outsider changing the system. Every time a smear was made, whether it was Jeremiah Wright, his preacher, who made inflammatory comments about race- Obama listened. And responded. With his race speech (amazing)
  • . They started Fight the Smears website. What was the ladder of engagement? Obama's e-mail list contains upwards of 13 million addresses. Over the course of the campaign, aides sent more than 7,000 different messages, many of them targeted to specific donation levels. A million people signed up for Obama's text-messaging program. On the night Obama accepted the Democratic nomination at Invesco Field in Denver, more than 30,000 phones among the crowd of 75,000 were used to text in to join the program. When he announced Biden as his VP, his supporters got the text message first.
  • Obama didn’t out-market the other candidates – he had a smaller budget and the same tools and everybody else.
  • What differentiated him was his mindset: he out-cared other candidates. He text messaged his supporters, he included them in every aspect of the campaign. He spent significant resource on keeping supporters updated and engaged through digital media – kept it authentic, transparent, and crafted a strong narrative.
  • What differentiated him was his mindset: he out-cared other candidates. He text messaged his supporters, he included them in every aspect of the campaign. He spent significant resource on keeping supporters updated and engaged through digital media – kept it authentic, transparent, and crafted a strong narrative.
  • Emily could tell Dave was beginning to see where she was going. Instead of coming up with a standard campaign that fits within the boxes or rules, she explained – the rule is that there are no rules, as cliched as it is. There are best practices in terms of measuring analytics – but it’s really about being innovative and being different to cut through the noise. “Always be a first-rate version of yourself – not a second-rate version of someone else” – Judy Garland.
  • Instead, she said, it was about thinking broadly. Although she realised that while Dave was relatively open to new ideas – other senior managers in the company were more conservative.
  • Emily explained that Air NZ’s success largely comes down to Rob Fyfe, a CEO whose personal style of running the company doesn't include many things you'd find in a lot of other businesses. Air NZ has no vision, no mission statement, no 'values' - rather, the staff live by the rules of 'be yourself' and 'treat everyone like a friend.Rob strives to communicate with authenticity, every day - he personally answers all his phone calls, emails and mail addressed to him - he's a genuine Kiwi guy, wanting to show the world how great NZ can be – and you can see that like Rob from Mr Vintage, he has fun with his company – I went into his Facebook page and could see photos of him playing dress up at office events, doing the haka at some corporate event, just having a good time. This kind of thing from the most senior levels of an organisation really do have a trickle-down effect – the fact that Rob Fyfe, like Rob from Mr Vintage, place so much trust in their social media staff, means that they can deliver and adapt and respond to customers accordingly – instead of having to go through several layers of bureaucracy.
  • Emily could see Dave beginning to shift – what, was he meant to become a ‘cooler CEO’ now? She said – it’s more about knowing who we are as an organisation. For Air NZ, Brand Characteristics are kept ‘top of mind’ across regular internal communications channels, as well as in-house promotions and competitions. Staff are encouraged to share their stories relating to the Brand Characteristics on our intranet and to nominate colleagues they believe are worthy of recognition through our “We’re Impressed” awards.Central to the efforts in changing culture is the development of a particular style of leadership. The Air New Zealand style of leadership is described as uniquely Kiwi: at once relaxed and welcoming, innovative and results focussed.
  • With a culture like that, of COURSE their social media campaigns are innovative and fresh and deliver great results. They also do initiatives like CEO of the Day, where they invite high school students from around the country to spend a day with Rob Fyfe and his senior managers learning what it takes to be a CEO. The students are asked to detail how they would make a difference if they were Air New Zealand’s CEO for the day. THey do a social media challenge at the airline’s design lab.“The students chosen had some great suggestions about social media programmes, smartphone applications and ways to enhance the in-flight experience for teenagers,” says Mr Fyfe. Like Obama, Air New Zealand is an outsider. But they put their resource and weight behind these media channels – they put the major spending priority on digital, and they chose capable people to lead their efforts. They didn’t necessarily invest in a whole new platform – they built technology around where the users already were.
  • IdeaPaint is a B2B company that sells a specialty paint that converts walls and other spaces into a dry-erase writing surface, eliminating the need for hanging white boards and opening up creative space.In keeping with their creative purpose and mission, IdeaPaint makes innovative use of their welcome tab by creating hot spots with links to their social sites. This promotes interactivity. The exploratory user will also find a link for a coupon.
  • A key to building long-term customer loyalty is to give your customers a good first experience with your product or service. IdeaPaint does this by providing detailed videos on their Facebook page on how to install and use their product.
  • IdeaPaint integrates several social components in their Facebook videos. In addition to the Like button, they use the Send button, which enables you to directly send the link to your friends. The Facebook comment section allows people to make comments that will show up on their wall.
  • Emily was pretty sure that Dave knew this question had already been answered, but she emphasized what she had already said.
  • To get sales, we’ve got to know our customers better, and know what they’re after, she explained. We’ve got to run promotions, we’ve got to give away things, to get some return (Chris Anderson: “FREE” book)
  • Co-founded last November by chef Terry Lin, and LinkedIn employees- Robby Kwok and Dan Yoo, Stone Korean Kitchen aims to bring modern Korean cuisine to the Financial District in San Francisco. Yoo tells me that as soon as the restaurant launched, he started a presence on social media sites, including Twitter, Yelp, and Facebook. But the challenge of many small businesses with social media is driving traffic to the right social media channel rather than splitting it between various sites. Yoo says that interconnecting content between the various profiles has helped gain Twitter followers and Facebook fans. Currently the restaurant’s Twitter profile has 65 followers and its Facebook page has 107 fans.  Many of these are repeat customers.  For a small restaurant, it doesn’t take that many loyal customers to keep the kitchen busy.Yoo says that he consistently Tweets links to comments and reviews on the Facebook page. Of course, Yoo also stresses the importance of managing Yelp reviews and responding to customer complaints on social media platforms.
  • But what really tipped the scales for Yoo was Groupon.  Yoo says that restaurant saw significant traction in both sales and traffic to its Yelp sites and Facebook page when the restaurant signed up for a Groupon deal in April. Stone Korean Kitchen sold 2600 groupons in one day, and saw a packed house for two months for both lunch and dinner. Now Yoo says that they see around 5 to 10 Groupons per day instead of 30 or 40 but the restaurant is still seeing a good number of repeat customers from the Groupon deal, says Yoo.One effect of the Groupon deal, besides increased sales, was that there were a flux of Yelp reviews. It took the company six months to accumulate 80 reviews on Yelp and after the deal, the restaurant accumulated 90 reviews within three months. Yoo also says that he’s seen a steady increase in Foursquare check-ins following the Groupondeal.Of course, since Yoo and Kwok are both LinkedIn employees (chef Lin manages the restaurant on a day-to-day basis), they put their heads together to figure out how they could use the professional social network to drive sales. With the ad targeting capabilities on LinkedIn, the restaurant started serving ads that target lawyers and bankers in the San Francisco area, as both industries are centralized in the financial district. They’ve noticed an increase in foot traffic and corporate catering requests as a result.  In the future, Yoo says that the restaurant is working on a promotion with Foursquare. And he is in talks with Twitter on featuring a deal on the social network’s new Earlybird venture.
  • The Cheese & Burger Society is sponsored by the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board. This page is an innovative way to promote Wisconsin cheese by talking about something many people love—burgers and grilling.One savvy practice introduced here is fan gating. Fan gating, also known as “like gating,” is where you require visitors to become a fan of your page to gain access to special content, discounts or contests.If you use a contest for fan gating, make sure you abide by Facebook’s terms of service. These articles can help: Mari Smith (compliance) and Sara Hawkins (legal promotions).
  • The Cheese & Burger Society is sponsored by the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board. This page is an innovative way to promote Wisconsin cheese by talking about something many people love—burgers and grilling.One savvy practice introduced here is fan gating. Fan gating, also known as “like gating,” is where you require visitors to become a fan of your page to gain access to special content, discounts or contests.If you use a contest for fan gating, make sure you abide by Facebook’s terms of service. These articles can help: Mari Smith (compliance) and Sara Hawkins (legal promotions).
  • To increase engagement, Cheese & Burger Society created a Send to a Friend app, allowing fans to send a cheeseburger to their friends. This is fun, easy and promotes viral visibility.The Cheese & Burger Society also encourages fans to post pictures. Photos and videos get a better EdgeRank (Facebook’s algorithm for determining what shows up on your fans’ news feeds) and people love to share photos.In fact, approximately 6 billion photos are shared on Facebook each month according to Pixable. For some tips on how to take full advantage of photos on your page, see this article by Debbie Hemley
  • Elevate the conversation to topics larger than your specific brand or niche.Find creative ways to engage your audience with photos and contests.If appropriate, develop an app to encourage fans to share your content (e.g., Send to a Friend).
  • The economic recession hit Portland small business owners hard in late summer and early autumn of 2008. Those offering “luxury” products or services were in an especially precarious position. West Café, a small upscale neighborhood restaurant, was particularly vulnerable to the economic downturn. Owners Doug Smith and Sean Concannon (chef) knew their restaurant wouldn’t survive the winter if they didn’t do something significant to drive business. They had tried traditional advertising in the past – with mixed to mostly poor results – so they were ready to try something new with Internet marketing. Analytics data showed they were lucky to get 5-10 visitors to the site per day, most arriving from a direct search of their web site domain – which implied these visitors were probably previous customers just looking for hours of operation or a phone number. Additionally, West Café had been hosting live jazz twice a month on Saturdays and really wanted to expand to every Saturday for consistency, but the numbers just weren’t there to support it.TheSolutionGiven a limited budget and time constraints, rebuilding the West Café web site was out of the question. Instead, social media addict (and West Café customer) Lisa Peyton decided to harness the power of social media to build buzz and drive business.Creation of the West Café BlogTheWest Cafe Blog was built using WordPress, which allowed for search engine optimization and easy content management. It was designed to match West Café’s branding, which was already established inside the restaurant and on its web site.
  • The blog includes categories to support West Café’s offerings, help draw in customers, and provide a platform for keyword-rich copy. Regular columns include a weekly fresh sheet posted by the West Cafe pastry chef, special event announcements, a monthly jazz calendar and daily drink specials- the blog was getting indexed by search engines and the site began picking up traffic very quickly. But that alone wouldn’t be enough to drive the kind of business West Café needed to be successful during an economic downturn. Enter Twitter. Portland is regularly listed among the top five U.S. cities using Twitter, so it was an ideal platform for getting the word out about West Café. Moreover, Portland is a walkable city with a vibrant downtown where most Web 2.0-related events take place, making West Café a viable destination – and desirable since it offers fast, free Wi-Fi.
  • She also targeted (and interacted with) key Portland tweeters, reached out to jazz fans, and created word-of-mouth buzz about the restaurant. In fact, many people who began following @WestCafePDX commented that they didn’t even know the restaurant existed before they were followed on Twitter!
Creative promotions across multiple social media platforms. Once the blog was up and running, it was time to get creative. In September, the presidential election was in full swing and dire economic predictions led the news. Peyton decided to use this news to their advantage. She proposed a tongue-in-cheek marketing blitz that drove unprecedented web traffic to West Café – and lots of happy drinkers and diners – through its doors.They kicked this off with a Five-Point Plan to help Portlanders deal with the economic crisis. This included: 1) $10 Bail-Out Menu, 2) daily Dow Drink Deals, etc. Peyton wrote a short blog post about the drink of the day, optimized it for Portland Happy Hour searches, and then Tweeted about it that afternoon to alert potential customers.Within just a few weeks, West Café was ranking within the first 15 Google search results for Portland Happy Hour! And, of course, many Portlanders got to try fun cocktails, great beer and fine wines at a discount.
  • Website traffic increased 500% from September to March. Page views increased 300% from September to March. Time on site increased by 25%Traffic from search engines increased from 42% to 70%. 
Total restaurant sales increased dramatically over the course of the campaign despite the region’s economic woes. Owner Sean Concannon had this to say about the effectiveness of the campaign: “We started this all in November and December and I can truly say business has been steady ever since the Election Party. This is due to the Internet promos. How to get factual numbers on this is hard, but I must say many places have closed their doors.”The percentages below reflect the increase in sales revenue month over month starting with September as the baseline:September – 100%
October – 12% increase
November – 32% increase
December – 26% increase
January – 25% increase
February – 34% increase
March – 20% increase
  • So what are you saying – Dave said – do we slash all of our traditional advertising spend?
  • Emily showed him this video.
  • She said – the next step in social media is social-location-mobile – that’s not beyond our budget for now, because we could use tools like Yelp, Facebook Places, Facebook Locations – if someone walks into our store, and checks in, we can offer them discounts – like Foursquare.
  • Instead of asking this, she says, the question becomes…
  • Emily added: it’s initiatives like that which are being invented to cut through the noise. The noise is only going to rise and rise.
  • Emily added: it’s initiatives like that which are being invented to cut through the noise. The noise is only going to rise and rise.
  • Emily added: it’s initiatives like that which are being invented to cut through the noise. The noise is only going to rise and rise.
  • How do you turn a regional service business into an international destination for industry thought leadership?Facebook.At least that’s what worked for Geoff Tucker, an equine dentist based in Palm City, FL.In a business driven by relationships, Geoff says that Facebook allows him to build new ones. “People do business with people who they’re friends with. Period,” he says. “And Facebook is a great way to get to know people. It allows people to see that I’m a person.”As he builds these relationships using social media, Geoff is also expanding his company’s reach. He says it was his blog, his Twitter feed, and his Facebook account that helped him win appearances on Horse Talk Radio and HorseGirl.tv.So what’s this done for his business? Geoff says that over the last year, Facebook alone has generated about 100 leads and 10-to-15 customers.
  • One year ago, the marketing team at Neenah Paper, a manufacturer of high-quality paper products, confronted a growing problem: It was becoming harder and harder to reach new potential customers. Their traditional channels — phone conversations and in-person meetings — were not working as well. Prospects were tuning them out.Jamie Saunders, Neenah’s marketing communications manager, noted that most of the company’s potential customers — designers, graphic artists and printers — were spending their time in front of their computers, and that social media could be a way to better engage them.So Neenah took a step into the social media world. While the experiment started with Neenah’s marketing team, its sales team was one of the biggest beneficiaries. They discovered they could do prospecting and nurturing via Twitter. Today the company has 10 sales representatives across the country using their personal Twitter accounts on behalf of Neenah to close new business.  Jamie says these sales reps are finding that social media is simply a more effective way of engaging with their prospects. “It’s an invitation to have a conversation. You’re getting permission to have a conversation — a conversation that used to happen in person.
  • She said - as I’ve explained. doing social media well' is about understanding social dynamics. Let me use the example of my friend Rich. She asked her friends on the weekend, "How do we get more Likes on Facebook?" And they discussed how - it's like in high school, where you get kids thinking, "How can I be more popular?" That's the same question: "How can I be more popular?" As Rich's girlfriend says, "I've never met anyone, EVER, who hasn't liked Rich." Rich is one of the warmest, most open, down-to-earth guys ever. And if some guy asked, "How can I be popular like Rich?” The answer couldn't be, "Do this, say that, be that."
  • Rich has some weird interests. Synchronised swimming. Animations. These are real pictures from his Facebook page. So if some random guy just tried doing synchronised swimming, or animations - I don't think that would make him popular. You need to look below the surface.
  • When you look past his behaviors, Rich has values - which influence his qualities- integrity and loyalty and empathy- which influence his behaviours - which ultimately craft his relationships. The values of an organisation are what influence their qualities - which influence their behaviours - which craft their product and service and relationships.
  • When you're not incumbent, you're forced to be more brave, you can experiment more. Smaller companies worried about not being able to compete with big - don't worry about them. We can do things that a lot of them can't do.
  • Emily explained how to build strong brand.
  • She explained how disasters came from not having authenticity, transparency, narrative.
  • A little while back I praised Vodafone New Zealand for their excellent Twittering, inside an article on How to Twitter if you are a Corporation. They reached out to customers, solved problems, gently nudged opinion their way and generally were liked by everybody.The account was run by Paul Brislen – who let his own account lie idle while he put himself into the Twittersphere.And then something happened.Vodafone decided to launch a campaign where “3G Guy” tours New Zealand giving away new net books. A great idea.Unfortunately rather than using @3Gguy or similar to promote the tour, Vodafone instead passed the respected @vodafoneNZ account over to a pimply youth – 3Gguy.The results are a fascinating case study.
  • When Honda decided to publish its upcoming Crosstour photos on Facebook, it should be ready for some serious feedback. Within a short time, its fan page was flooded with negative comments regarding the look of Honda’s new CUV. It was clear that most “fans” were not too thrilled with the new design. But not too long later, we saw some really positive comments about the model. Lo and behold, they came from Honda’s product manager who didn’t disclose his own relationship with the company until the angry crowd called him out. Go on, use social media to promote your products but if you do get a bad feedback, don’t try to manipulate it. Social media users are savvy enough to expose you if they want to.
  • Computer manufacturer, Asus hosted a sponsored contest where participating bloggers wrote reviews for its products for a chance to win the Asus review kit. The community voted for a blogger named Gavyn Britton, a choice Asus wasn’t so keen on. Hence, they decided to change the rules of the competition and gave away the prize to another blogger. This resulted in an outrage against the Taiwanese computer manufacturer, and the story went mainstream as well. Social media is all about transparency. You cannot wiggle your way out of it and give the prize to someone your community didn’t choose. Let me emphasize this again, social media is not about being in control. If you are going to be a control freak, stay in a relationship with traditional media
  • She knew that this was the main question on his mind.
  • But she wanted to switch it to this.
  • Where do we start? Dave asked. Emily said – we start with Why. This is the Golden Circle – which Simon Sinek talks about in his TED talk. Social media is all about this diagram. Everyone knows what they do. Some know how they do it. Few people know WHY. But once you know the Why - everything else becomes a lot easier.
  • - Carefully select a top member of your firm to champion Web 2.0. I can’t say it often enough: remember the mid 1990s when the prevailing wisdom was that the Internet was for geeks and no real business would do business online. Realize that many people in your management team will prefer the status quo.- Social media digitizes word of mouth, and people talk most about exceptions, what bothers them most or what inspires them. Think about ways that you can:Make it easier for people to talk by using social media to lower the cost for people to find others with their interestsHelp them communicate at a low cost (social networks are largely asynchronous, so they fit busy schedules)Act in remarkable ways, and give people tools to make it easy to talk about it. Participate in discussions, but enable stakeholders to own them.- Adopt an ecosystem mindset. You need to create an implementation plan that facilitates stakeholder activity in major branded venues like Facebook, but also field your own venue when you can add unique value to stakeholders, support business processes you care about, and ask for stakeholder support. The Obama campaign story is an excellent example. The Social Network Roadmap is a structured approach (full disclosure, I designed it).- Trust your stakeholders to discover and do the right thing. Your relationship with them is changing under your feet; smart organizations are becoming more cooperative by sharing “control.” The Obama campaign, Air NZ, Mr Vintage - could not have grown without their supporters promoting it for them. It energizes people to contribute in a meaningful cause even more than if you had done everything for them.
  • - Carefully select a top member of your firm to champion Web 2.0. I can’t say it often enough: remember the mid 1990s when the prevailing wisdom was that the Internet was for geeks and no real business would do business online. Realize that many people in your management team will prefer the status quo.- Social media digitizes word of mouth, and people talk most about exceptions, what bothers them most or what inspires them. Think about ways that you can:Make it easier for people to talk by using social media to lower the cost for people to find others with their interestsHelp them communicate at a low cost (social networks are largely asynchronous, so they fit busy schedules)Act in remarkable ways, and give people tools to make it easy to talk about it. Participate in discussions, but enable stakeholders to own them.- Adopt an ecosystem mindset. You need to create an implementation plan that facilitates stakeholder activity in major branded venues like Facebook, but also field your own venue when you can add unique value to stakeholders, support business processes you care about, and ask for stakeholder support. The Obama campaign story is an excellent example. The Social Network Roadmap is a structured approach (full disclosure, I designed it).- Trust your stakeholders to discover and do the right thing. Your relationship with them is changing under your feet; smart organizations are becoming more cooperative by sharing “control.” The Obama campaign, Air NZ, Mr Vintage - could not have grown without their supporters promoting it for them. It energizes people to contribute in a meaningful cause even more than if you had done everything for them.
  • it easier for people to talk by using social media to lower the cost for people to find others with their interestsHelp them communicate at a low cost (social networks are largely asynchronous, so they fit busy schedules)Act in remarkable ways, and give people tools to make it easy to talk about it. Participate in discussions, but enable stakeholders to own them.- Adopt an ecosystem mindset. You need to create an implementation plan that facilitates stakeholder activity in major branded venues like Facebook, but also field your own venue when you can add unique value to stakeholders, support business processes you care about, and ask for stakeholder support. The Obama campaign story is an excellent example. The Social Network Roadmap is a structured approach (full disclosure, I designed it).- Trust your stakeholders to discover and do the right thing. Your relationship with them is changing under your feet; smart organizations are becoming more cooperative by sharing “control.” The Obama campaign, Air NZ, Mr Vintage - could not have grown without their supporters promoting it for them. It energizes people to contribute in a meaningful cause even more than if you had done everything for them.
  • it easier for people to talk by using social media to lower the cost for people to find others with their interestsHelp them communicate at a low cost (social networks are largely asynchronous, so they fit busy schedules)Act in remarkable ways, and give people tools to make it easy to talk about it. Participate in discussions, but enable stakeholders to own them.- Adopt an ecosystem mindset. You need to create an implementation plan that facilitates stakeholder activity in major branded venues like Facebook, but also field your own venue when you can add unique value to stakeholders, support business processes you care about, and ask for stakeholder support. The Obama campaign story is an excellent example. The Social Network Roadmap is a structured approach (full disclosure, I designed it).- Trust your stakeholders to discover and do the right thing. Your relationship with them is changing under your feet; smart organizations are becoming more cooperative by sharing “control.” The Obama campaign, Air NZ, Mr Vintage - could not have grown without their supporters promoting it for them. It energizes people to contribute in a meaningful cause even more than if you had done everything for them.
  • WikinomicsThe Wisdom of the CrowdsGroundswellWatch This, Listen UpHere Comes EverybodyTrust Agents
  • Cluetrain ManifestoWikinomicsThe Wisdom of the CrowdsGroundswellWatch This, Listen UpHere Comes EverybodyTrust Agents
  • WikinomicsThe Wisdom of the CrowdsGroundswellWatch This, Listen UpHere Comes EverybodyTrust Agents
  • Asking Better Questions in Social Media

    1. 1. Dave
    2. 2. Emily
    3. 3. 200,000,000 blogs
    4. 4. Only 14% trust advertisements
    5. 5. 78% consumerstrust peer recommendations
    6. 6. 81% of Generation Y use Facebook daily
    7. 7. The path to 50 million users - Radio: 38 years
    8. 8. TV: 13 years
    9. 9. The Internet: 4 years
    10. 10. Facebook: 100 million usersadded in less than 9 months
    11. 11. The catch-22
    12. 12. ROI
    13. 13. Conversational &buzz tracking Influencer identification&outreach Brand Teams&Fan Programs Community Building&Product Peer Groups Strategic Social Media Planning &BuyingNatural Seeding & Social Media Optimization Paid Seeding & Social Media Advertising Social Channels&Viral Widgets
    14. 14. Customer Campaign Relationshipunderstanding Analytics engagement managementBehavior Content Responding Toolsanalysis strategy to crises trainingReaching Content Anticipating Tracking out production needs statisticsCustomer Building Informing Launch service trust strategy
    15. 15. Start with the right questions
    16. 16. What can we get?
    17. 17. What can we give?
    18. 18. 3484 new participants
    19. 19. Mr. Vintage URL was 4th most tweetedkeyword globally on July 7th (759 tweets)
    20. 20. 3,575 new Facebookfans
    21. 21. 11,803 „tell-a-friend" emails sent
    22. 22. What should we be saying?
    23. 23. How should we be listening?
    24. 24. $500 million
    25. 25. How can we out-market?
    26. 26. How can we out-care?
    27. 27. What should we be doing?
    28. 28. What could we be doing?
    29. 29. “Welcome as a friend. Can do. Be yourself.Share New Zealand.”
    30. 30. Idea Paint
    31. 31. How can we drive sales?
    32. 32. How can we make their life better?
    33. 33. Stone Korean Kitchen
    34. 34. Cheese & Burger Society
    35. 35. Is traditional media dead?
    36. 36. How can we best play ping-pong?
    37. 37. How do we get their attention?
    38. 38. How do we give them our attention?
    39. 39. More content is created today, in 48 hours, than was createdfrom the beginning of time until 2003.
    40. 40. 24+ hours of video to YouTube every minute. 3,000+ images to Flickr every minute. 1 mil + companies have Linkedin Company Pages. 2bn+ video views on YouTube every 24 hours.Nearly 2bn people searches on Linkedin during 2010.
    41. 41. It‟s not about content.
    42. 42. The Equine Practice
    43. 43. Neenah Paper
    44. 44. Values > Behaviors >Relationships > Results
    45. 45. Authenticity,transparency, narrative.
    46. 46. Disasters
    47. 47. What‟s the ROI?
    48. 48. Do we want to be around in 20 years?
    49. 49. Immediate steps
    50. 50. 1. Stop thinking about what to say: rearrange resource to spend more time listening.
    51. 51. 2. Address management issues: what stops you listening?
    52. 52. 3. Select a top member of your firm to champion Web 2.0.
    53. 53. 4. Email me for a list of resources and make time to read.
    54. 54. Books
    55. 55. adele.barlow@gmail.com http://step-one.biz @adelebarlow
    56. 56. Follow us on twitter @NZ_tech

    ×