The Emergence of MOOCs: Opportunities for Reaching Out

459 views

Published on

Presentation to the Division of Human Genetics, 2014

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
459
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
9
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

The Emergence of MOOCs: Opportunities for Reaching Out

  1. 1. The Emergence of MOOCs OPPORTUNITIES FOR REACHING OUT DISCUSSION WITH DIVISION OF HUMAN GENETICS ANDREW DEACON, MARY-ANN FIFE, JANET SMALL, SUKAINA WALJI CENTRE FOR INNOVATION IN LEARNING AND TEACHING 12 August 2014
  2. 2. Emergence globally Introduction
  3. 3. Massive • Have many thousands participanting Open • Open to anyone with an internet connection Online • Everything is online Course • Courses structured with start and finish dates M O O C
  4. 4. MOOCs didn’t just appear…. Image – Giulia Forsythe
  5. 5. MOOCs - open & online MOOCs Online coursesOpen content
  6. 6. Traditional Online Courses MOOCs Participation Capped by facilitation and assessment resourcing Accommodates thousands by having almost no individual support Motivation Earn a qualification Take what is of interests Backgrounds Generally have similar academic backgrounds Often extremely diverse academic backgrounds Assessment Meets accreditation standards Not formally accredited Cost Pay to register for courses Free and optionally paying for certificates Lecturer Responsible for teaching a curriculum aligned to a qualification and providing support Engages people interested in the topic, with no responsibility for curriculum alignment
  7. 7. April 2012 http://edutechnica.com/moocmap
  8. 8. October 2012 http://edutechnica.com/moocmap
  9. 9. April 2013 http://edutechnica.com/moocmap
  10. 10. October 2013 http://edutechnica.com/moocmap
  11. 11. Participants
  12. 12. Completion Rates http://www.katyjordan.com/MOOCproject.html
  13. 13.  Reasons for doing MOOCs are of interest  but not completing does not mean failing http://www.edcentral.org
  14. 14. Mapping the landscape An institutional perspective
  15. 15. e.g. Short courses Global Citizenship Write Science courses e.g. most degree programmes
  16. 16. Showcase teaching and introduce topics with high-profile ‘rockstar’ presenters Introduce fields and support students in undergraduate study Develop skills and introduce topics for postgraduate study Showcase research and special interest topics of interest to postgraduate level Showcase professional careers for continuing education, professional development and qualifications
  17. 17. Category 1 Teaching showcase General interest high profile course Showcases the institution by means of an engaging subject or personality led. Global interest and matches a popular understanding of high profile MOOCs  n High production costs | high enrollment | loose curriculum ties
  18. 18. Category 2 Gateway skills Provides foundational, bridging or enhancement skills for pre HE entry or during undergraduate pathways towards specialisation. Could replace teaching for 'bottleneck courses.’ Local interest, either within the institution or at a country-wide setting. Moderate production costs | low enrollment | close curriculum ties
  19. 19. Category 3 Graduate literacies Post- graduate level courses to support application or programmes of study Focussed on building postgraduate literacies. Likely to be of local or national interest. Moderate production costs | low enrollment | close curriculum ties
  20. 20. Category 4 Professional showcase Geared towards vocational skills development, re-tooling and professional development. Could be offered in conjunction with professional bodies. Likely to be of local interest, although some specialised topics may be globally relevant. . Moderate to high production costs | medium to high enrollment Close curriculum ties | Potential pathway to formal courses
  21. 21. Category 5 Research showcase Showcase research or more specialised topics of interest Offered at postgraduate level and assume some background in the topicstill geared towards general or leisure learning. Likely to have global appeal. Moderate/high production costs | medium/high enrollment Loose curriculum ties
  22. 22. https://www.class-central.com
  23. 23. Course offered simultaneously as a formal and as a open course. Small private open course nested inside a MOOC Massive Online Course: formal course inspired by MOOC pedagogy Students in a course taking a MOOC with added local support and additional material Massive Open Online Course Formal course with lectures and support.
  24. 24. Wrapped MOOCs at UCT Meet-up Topic Meets every Monday for 5 weeks Critical Thinking in Global Challenges https://www.coursera.org/course/criticalthinking Meets every Thursday for 5 weeks Principles of Written English https://www.edx.org/course/uc-berkeleyx/uc-berkeleyx-colwri2-2x-principles-1348 Meets every Monday for 6 weeks Understanding Research: An Overview for Health Professionals https://www.coursera.org/course/researchforhealth Meets every second Wednesday for 5 weeks Model Thinking https://www.coursera.org/course/modelthinking Meets every Monday for 6 weeks Design and Interpretation of Clinical Trials https://www.coursera.org/course/clintrials Meets every Wednesday for 10 weeks Data Analysis and Statistical Inference https://www.coursera.org/course/statistics Meets every Thursday for 6 weeks University Teaching 101 https://www.coursera.org/course/univteaching101
  25. 25. Local initiatives MOOCs at UCT
  26. 26. Making the most of MOOCs Participants Institutional researchers Educators What MOOCs exist and why might I want to do a MOOC? What is there to learn from MOOCs? How can I use and develop MOOCs? When are MOOCs useful?
  27. 27. Participants: Why take a MOOC?  Learn new skills e.g., stats for research  Learn for enrichment e.g., understanding climate change  Explore a degree option i.e., before paying  Experience online learning i.e., learning about teaching online
  28. 28. What kinds of learning? Participant may choose to:  Have a look (like paging through a book)  Start but decide when is enough (like dipping into a book)  Explore only some parts (like a reference book)  Go along for the ride (like a quick read)  Engage fully with the intention of doing more than expected (like studying a textbook)
  29. 29. Educators: Using existing MOOCs  Flipping courses with MOOCs  Blending MOOCs with face-to-face classroom sessions  Use MOOCs as Learning Resources  Use for Professional Development  Wrapping a MOOC to supplementary skills for students
  30. 30. Research: Learning from MOOCs The massiveness of MOOCs, their accessibility, and the wide range of questions they raise make the topic a very fertile area for research, and this is likely to generate new methods of research and analysis in the educational field Bates. Tony. (2014) MOOCs: getting to know you better, Distance Education
  31. 31. If you’re interested in MOOCs  Enroll for a MOOC - check www.class-central.com/  Draw MOOCs into classroom - ask your students about their experiences?  Set up a study group - or join the CILT unstudy group  Scoop-it curated links http://www.scoop.it/t/moocswatch
  32. 32. Contacts  Andrew.Deacon@uct.ac.za  Mary-Ann.Fife@uct.ac.za  Janet.Small@uct.ac.za  Sukaina.Walji@uct.ac.za This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/za/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA. Twitter: #UCT_MOOCs

×