Andrew Deacon
Centre for Educational Technology, University of Cape Town
Janet Small & Nicola Pallitt
Centre for Open Lear...
Outline
• Global Citizenship programme at UCT
• Reimaging after 4 years
• Badging and gamification
• Designs as Enhancemen...
UCT Global Citizenship Programme
Global Citizenship: Leading for Social Justice
– Three short courses:
Continuing Educatio...
Goals of Global Citizenship Programme
1. Knowledge: Exposing students to global
citizenship and social justice issues beyo...
GC Media and Branding
GC marketing
GC classesGC class activities
GC service daysGC reflective writing
GC Course Website on LMS (2012)
Reimagining GC course site (2013)
After four years:
• Redesign to be more student-centred
• Actively promote course comple...
Badges: Physical vs Digital
• Badges in the physical world:
–Physical representing a rank or
accomplishment
• Badges in th...
Gamification: Not games
Using game-thinking and game mechanics
in a non-game context
to engage people and solve problems
-...
Gamification of education?
• Do universities use game elements?
– Students get “points” for completing assignments
– Point...
Learning Design Thinking
A complex, iterative process
of problem-defining and problem-solving
of ill-defined learning need...
Macro-level
becoming a global
citizen
Meso-level
reflective writing
Micro-level
coherent course
website
Learning Design
Ed...
Taxonomy of Design Problems
New Design
Problems
Enhancement
Problems
Selection
Problems
Tuning
Problems
Crises
Intractable...
Generic Design Cycle
Conceiving and giving
form to something
that addresses
a problems
User
experience
design
plan
produce...
Discovery
Dream
Design
Delivery
Decide what to learn about,
who to involve,
and how to involve them
Conduct the inquiry,
s...
Discovery: Activities in GC2
Activities Evidence Interface cues
Attend class sessions
x8
Signed register Acknowledge
compl...
Dream: Dashboard options
Design: GC2 choices made
• Interface communicates
completion requirements
• Simplify reflection expectations
• Tutors part...
Delivery: GC2 Dashboard (2013)
Delivery: Dashboard lightboxes
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
29-Jul
30-Jul
31-Jul
1-Aug
2-Aug
3-Aug
4-Aug
5-Aug
6-Aug
7-Aug
8-Aug
9-Aug
10-Aug
11-Aug
12-Aug
13-A...
Digital Portfolios
• Broad interest to
– Enable students to create portfolios
– Develop reflective writing skills
– Repurp...
Mozilla OpenBadges
• Mozilla Foundation project
– Provides infrastructure for hosting badges
– Control rests with badge re...
Mozilla OpenBadges: Backpack
Portfolio collection title
Evidence (with URL)
Criteria (with URL)
Conclusions
• Appropriateness of badges
– If not in Global Citizenship, then where?
– Fun and appreciated by students
– He...
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Global Citizenship badges: Using gamification to recognize non-formal learning in a university context

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Presented at the 15th Annual Conference on World Wide Web Applications, Cape Town, September 2013

The University of Cape Town offers a co-curricular Global Citizenship programme providing students with opportunities to engage critically with contemporary global debates and reflect on issues of citizenship and social justice. The required learning activities include writing blog posts on the course site, participating in voluntary community service and creating small campaigns on campus. While there is enthusiastic engagement with activities, it remains challenging to monitor and assess student participation. Additionally these learning experiences are sufficiently different to academic courses that students remark on the difficulties in knowing what is being required. Over the past four years we have developed a successful learning environment for the programme and now needed to consider a redesign. A widely discussed strategy to acknowledge skills and achievements developed through informal learning involves the use of badges and related gamification ideas. Badges can provide a focus and motivation, and provide a mechanism to help compile a portfolio of evidence. Gamification involves using game-thinking and game mechanics in a non-game context to engage people. These are typically employed to increase motivation and participations. We draw on experience redesigning a Global Citizenship short course to explore the emerging design process and the possible applications and limitations of gamification to recognise informal learning in a university context. The Appreciative Inquiry stages guided the engagement with tutors and lecturers to enhance what is already being done well in the Global Citizenship programme.

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Global Citizenship badges: Using gamification to recognize non-formal learning in a university context

  1. 1. Andrew Deacon Centre for Educational Technology, University of Cape Town Janet Small & Nicola Pallitt Centre for Open Learning, University of Cape Town Global Citizenship Badges using gamification to recognize non-formal learning in a university context
  2. 2. Outline • Global Citizenship programme at UCT • Reimaging after 4 years • Badging and gamification • Designs as Enhancement vs Problem-centric • Discovery – Dream – Design – Delivery • Towards digital portfolios • Conclusions
  3. 3. UCT Global Citizenship Programme Global Citizenship: Leading for Social Justice – Three short courses: Continuing Education certificate – Each year involves over 200 students from all faculties – Students becoming citizens rather than simply learners
  4. 4. Goals of Global Citizenship Programme 1. Knowledge: Exposing students to global citizenship and social justice issues beyond degree and discipline 2. Skills: Developing capacity for leadership on contemporary social justice issues by improving active listening and critical thinking 3. Values: Promoting awareness of themselves as future global citizens motivated to work for social justice through community service
  5. 5. GC Media and Branding GC marketing
  6. 6. GC classesGC class activities
  7. 7. GC service daysGC reflective writing
  8. 8. GC Course Website on LMS (2012)
  9. 9. Reimagining GC course site (2013) After four years: • Redesign to be more student-centred • Actively promote course completion • Draw on tutors to inform the redesign • Imagine new possibilities: – Supporting badges and gamification elements – Creating portfolios of reflective writing
  10. 10. Badges: Physical vs Digital • Badges in the physical world: –Physical representing a rank or accomplishment • Badges in the digital world: –Digital ‘clickable’ portfolios or collections –Accomplishment linking evidence to criteria http://www.flickr.com/photos/conner395/
  11. 11. Gamification: Not games Using game-thinking and game mechanics in a non-game context to engage people and solve problems - Sebastian Deterding (2011)
  12. 12. Gamification of education? • Do universities use game elements? – Students get “points” for completing assignments – Points translate to “badges” for passing courses – Students performing well “level up” at year end – Best performs get on the Dean’s “leaderboard” • Not really…
  13. 13. Learning Design Thinking A complex, iterative process of problem-defining and problem-solving of ill-defined learning needs that requires a creative and analytic approach through iterative prototyping based on formative feedback
  14. 14. Macro-level becoming a global citizen Meso-level reflective writing Micro-level coherent course website Learning Design Education - Technology Gap
  15. 15. Taxonomy of Design Problems New Design Problems Enhancement Problems Selection Problems Tuning Problems Crises Intractable problems
  16. 16. Generic Design Cycle Conceiving and giving form to something that addresses a problems User experience design plan produce gap (for problem-centric designs)
  17. 17. Discovery Dream Design Delivery Decide what to learn about, who to involve, and how to involve them Conduct the inquiry, share insights Envision the ideal impact or outcomes for those involved Develop principles to guide the changes Innovation, improvisation and more inquiry Appreciative Inquiry (for enhancement–centric designs)
  18. 18. Discovery: Activities in GC2 Activities Evidence Interface cues Attend class sessions x8 Signed register Acknowledge completion Community work days x2 Signed register or blog Badges Post reflective blogs x4 Blog post on LMS Badges Submit essays x2 Submission on LMS Acknowledge completion
  19. 19. Dream: Dashboard options
  20. 20. Design: GC2 choices made • Interface communicates completion requirements • Simplify reflection expectations • Tutors participate in design • Include feedback on progress • Badges (link evidence & criteria) • Students compile a portfolio
  21. 21. Delivery: GC2 Dashboard (2013)
  22. 22. Delivery: Dashboard lightboxes
  23. 23. 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 29-Jul 30-Jul 31-Jul 1-Aug 2-Aug 3-Aug 4-Aug 5-Aug 6-Aug 7-Aug 8-Aug 9-Aug 10-Aug 11-Aug 12-Aug 13-Aug 14-Aug 15-Aug 16-Aug 17-Aug 18-Aug 19-Aug 20-Aug 21-Aug 22-Aug 23-Aug 24-Aug 25-Aug 26-Aug 27-Aug 28-Aug 29-Aug 30-Aug 31-Aug 1-Sep 2-Sep 3-Sep 4-Sep 5-Sep 6-Sep 7-Sep Monitoring (‘game mechanics’) Falling behind with blogs Catch-up or starting next blog Blog done on-time previous blog deadline
  24. 24. Digital Portfolios • Broad interest to – Enable students to create portfolios – Develop reflective writing skills – Repurpose for others courses, CVs, … • Practical challenges – Difficult to anticipate student future needs – Difficult to curate and manage
  25. 25. Mozilla OpenBadges • Mozilla Foundation project – Provides infrastructure for hosting badges – Control rests with badge recipient – Shares success stories • OpenBadges – Criteria: URL with description and name of issuer – Evidence: URL to digital artefact meeting criteria
  26. 26. Mozilla OpenBadges: Backpack Portfolio collection title Evidence (with URL) Criteria (with URL)
  27. 27. Conclusions • Appropriateness of badges – If not in Global Citizenship, then where? – Fun and appreciated by students – Help align more formal structuring of reflection – Feedback on progress – Link criteria and evidence – Moving towards digital portfolios • Of course, designs should be mindful of – Appreciating what is working well – Side effects and social contracts

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