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Dogs and their Sixth Sense

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We’ve all done it. We return home to find our pups waiting for us by the door, as if they knew before we did that we’d leave work early that day, and we make a mental note: this dog is beyond special, she’s almost otherworldly. The anecdotal evidence among dog-owners of their furry friends sensing future events is everywhere. Distressed behavior preceding earthquakes and storms. Advanced knowledge of sicknesses or pregnancies. Dogs that can sniff out bad people, bad days and even ghosts. The science around proving these claims has been much hazier, though, with most scientists concluding that rather than dogs possessing actual psychic abilities, they are simply animals whose heightened senses of hearing and smell (not to mention intelligence and empathy) give them certain abilities that, while not technically magical, are reminiscent of the same mythologies surrounding our favorite superheroes. So move over Superman, you’ve got nothing on Fido!

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Dogs and their Sixth Sense

  1. 1. DOGS AND THEIR SIXTH SENSE Adam Croman
  2. 2. We’ve all done it. We return home to find our pups waiting for us by the door, as if they knew before we did that we’d leave work early that day, and we make a mental note: this dog is beyond special, she’s almost otherworldly. Most scientists conclude that rather than dogs possessing actual psychic abilities, they are simply animals whose heightened senses of hearing and smell (not to mention intelligence and empathy) give them certain abilities that, while not technically magical, are reminiscent of the same mythologies surrounding our favorite superheroes.
  3. 3. What a Dog Smells A dog’s sense of smell is between 10,000 to 100,000 times more acute than a human’s capabilities They contain up to 300 million olfactory receptors in their noses (compared to our 5 million), which are structured differently than ours, allowing separate flow paths for breathing and olfaction Storm prediction is largely attributed to dogs’ ability to smell chemical changes in the air, particularly faraway traces of ozone, a byproduct of lightning Dogs can also smell changes in our health Service dogs have been trained to alert owners to emergencies such as diabetic attacks and seizures, and many believe that dogs become more protective of their pregnant owners
  4. 4. What a Dog Hears Dogs hear four times the distance of an average human They can also hear higher-pitched sounds and detect a larger frequency range than us Your dog can identify the specific sounds of your car and your footsteps and hear them from an impressive distance Dr. Stanley Coren asserts that a dog’s earthquake detection skills can also be attributed to their ability to hear tectonic shifting In a 2012 study, 49 percent of the nearly 200 dogs studied showed a marked increase in anxiety the day before an earthquake
  5. 5. What a Dog Sees A dog’s vision is generally considered to be worse than its human counterpart because dogs can’t see well up close or far away A recent study found, however, that they also have ultraviolet vision, meaning your dog may see things that are invisible to you.
  6. 6. For more information Please visit: http://adamcroman.com/

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