Asian Golf Business April 2014

1,091 views

Published on

Asian Golf Business - April 2014 issue

Published in: Business, Sports
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,091
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Asian Golf Business April 2014

  1. 1. Issue #62 MARCH 2014 www.asiapacificgolfgroup.com | www.golfconference.org | www.cmaa-asia.com CLUBMANAGEMENT››FOOD&BEVERAGE››CLUBSERVICES››TURFMATTERS›› GENERAlNEWS Golf Trade Golf Course Architecture & Developers Turf Maintenance & Equipment Golf Clubs & Resorts Manufacturers Incorporating Club News AsianGolfBusiness–OfficialMagazineforCMAA-AsiaPacificChapter! ASIA CHA SPECIAL EVENT // 87th CMAA WORLD CONFERENCE AND CLUB BUSINESS EXPO B U I L D I N G A D R E A M T E A M TEAM DYNAMICS SPECIAL FEATURE WHAT IS THE GOLF MARKET IN INDIA CLUB MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS FOR SUCCESS BY JAMES CRONK PRUSA’S POINT COMMUNICATION SKILLS CLUB LEADER STEWART LEE STEPPING OUT IN STYLE MIKE ORLOFF BUSINESS OF GOLF BRUCEWILLIAMS THE GOLF SAGE – REVIEW of THE 2014 GOlf industry Show
  2. 2. PUBLISHER's OFFICE  MIKE SEBASTIAN mike@asiapacificgolfgroup.com Publisher/Editor: Mike Sebastian Executive Director: Angela Raymond Art Director: Saiful Sufian Video: EditorWayne Lwee Finance: Myra Paras Marketing Executive: Alice Ho PUBLISHED BY: Asia Pacific Golf Development COnferences Pte Ltd Contact: mike@asiapacificgolfgroup.com OFFICIAL Websites:www.asiapacificgolfgroup.com; www.golfconference.org Office ADDRESS: Suite 05-06, Hong Aik Building, 22 Kallang Avenue, Singapore 339413 Tel: 65-6323 2800 Fax: 65-6323 2838 ALLRIGHTSRESERVED.NopartofAsianGolfBusinessmaybereproducedinanyformormeanswithoutthewrittenpermissionofthepublisher.OpinionsexpressedbywritersandadvertiserswithinAsianGolfBusinessarenotnecessarilyendorsedby AsianGolfBusiness.AsianGolfBusinessacceptsnoresponsibilityforunsolicitedmanuscripts,transparenciesorothermaterials.Manuscripts,photographsandartworkwillnotbereturnedunlessaccompaniedbyappropriatepostage. 2014 will go down in the annals of golf’s history as the year in which a concerted move was made to change how the game of golf is played. The one initiative that has caught the imagination of many in the industry is that put forward by Mark King, chief executive officer of TaylorMade adidas Golf who launched“Hack Golf”with a US$5 million war- chest to seek ideas to help innovate and change the game of golf.   The Asia Pacific Golf Group (publisher of Asian Golf Business and Asian Golf Monthly) is a strong supporter of this call. In this issue, we decided to seek the reaction of one of the world’s leading golf architectural firms on“Hack Golf”. We elected to speak to Brian Curley, principal of the award- winning Schmidt Curley Design. This is what he had to say: “I have been a long time fan of the concept. I am not sure 15 inches (in reference to the proposed size of the cup) is the answer as that is too big in my opinion but a larger diameter hole has a number of merits including  faster pace of play and placing a greater emphasis on shot making over putting, which is the fun part of the game.  Keep in mind that  there have been discussions long ago that tried to place less scoring value on a putt versus a full shot ... this is not a new discussion.  I am pushing to incorporate two hole size options on our Fantasy course so that elite players and beginners alike can play at the same pace while enjoying the main emphasis of the course, the imagery and shot making over whacky, fun features.   I personally think that 6 to 8 inches would keep the integrity of the game in place but speed things up by 25%. Think of all the putts you miss at the edge and all the putts you leave short for fear of the 4 footer coming back. That goes away with an even slightly  larger hole. Slowing green speeds is an obvious cure as well but I do like the larger hole concept.   One of my hypotheticals  I have used  for many  years is  this – imagine the game of golf did not exist and you were pitching the idea to someone. The conversation would go something like – "I have a great new idea – the game is called "Golf "and the idea is to hit a ball from one area  to another. Along the way the playing surface weaves between and around hazards of sand and such and you try to keep the ball on grass.  The wind and the elements  cause havoc along the way and it is great exercise.  The  grass  gets maintained tighter where  the ball runs easily along the ground until you get to the "green" where the surface is very 02/03Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News MARCH 2014 Thoughts From An Architect On Change tightly mowed and you "putt" the ball into a hole - "How big is the hole?'" someone asks - I don't know, maybe about like this ( you say as you arc your fingers on each hands together  forming about an 8 inch circle). NOBODY would say the hole should be 4 1/4 inches! If someone offered that  the hole be small, the response would be "nope, that will take too long to play and it would be too expensive to keep the greens in  proper shape".   The hole is the size it is not because there was a lengthy  debate about the issue (as any current sports organization would debate the intricate rules of its sport )  but because  long ago, some Scotsman stumbled into his shed and dug up a piece of pipe that was round and able to penetrate the turf - that dimension  (that mirrored the  slow green speeds of the time) stuck and was never challenged in a sport that holds so dearly to traditions. Now we have a competition for green speeds that, in effect, has reduced the  hole size even further. And people  now wonder why it takes so long to play.   The great thing about golf is its traditions . Unfortunately, it is the clinging to traditions that could cause its slow demise. I think the issue is one that needs an honest analysis rather than a knee jerk reaction.” "Ipersonallythinkthat6to8incheswouldkeeptheintegrityofthegameinplacebutspeed thingsupby25%.Thinkofalltheputtsyoumissattheedgeandalltheputtsyouleave shortforfearofthe4footercomingback.Thatgoesawaywithanevenslightly largerhole. SlowinggreenspeedsisanobviouscureaswellbutIdolikethelargerholeconcept." –BrianCurley,principaloftheaward-winningSchmidtCurleyDesign.
  3. 3. CONTENTS By understanding what inspires the people in your team, you will be able to get the buy in you need for any undertaking. Instilling the highest standards for training in your operation will give your team the knowledge base needed for your success. Really communicate with everyone in a way that they feel connected and you will have the most loyal people and be known as the place to work.The best part is that this is so simple and doable - why wouldn't you do it? And if you are ... Don't stop now and teach others what you are doing!! Jessica Glidewell shares her knowledge on how to be an effective leader - one needs to continually look for new ways to discover excellence in every part of his or her team and operation. Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News ISSUE #62, MARCH 2014 – TEAM DYNAMICS Pg8 COVER STORY: Building a Dream Team!
  4. 4.  Pg14 SPECIAL EVENT 87th CMAA World Conference Displays Optimism Pg12 Staged at the sprawling Orlando World Centre Marriott from February 4 – 8, club managers from America and Canada,Europe,South America,Asia and Australia networked and participated in various sessions.This  enthusiasm was most noticeable at the International Symposium,a popular workshop that provided perspectives on global club management problems and solutions. BRUCE WILLIAMS GOLF SAGE Golf Industry Show 2014 – The Review Pg14 The show is run by the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America (GCSAA) but it is also a time and place for the American Society of Golf Course Architects,National Golf Course Owners,Golf Course Builders Association of America,the United States Golf Association,the National Golf Foundation and the Society of Golf Course Appraisers to network.This event is held annually in the USA but draws people from all around the world. GCSAA reaches out to the many international friends and members across the globe. The international lounge is always filled with people from around the world as a place to meet and greet.Bruce Williams gives his take on the event. SPECIAL FEATURE Golf in India – What is the Market? Pg22 India is set to become the next China in terms of golf development.Pacific Coast Design (PCD) has been site planning and designing golf courses in India since 1993 and have so far completed 15 golf projects around India.Paul Reeves and Phil Ryan of PCD give their insights on the Indian Golf market and reflect on what is actually happening in India with regards to golf development. Golfplan Spreading Its Art & Science in the Region Pg30 This is a company that prides itself in its belief that golf course architecture is a combination of Art and Science.According to Kevin Ramsey,vice president and principal of Golfplan,regardless of whether the completed project is a resort, residential golf community,daily fee course or municipal golf course,the firm’s unique design solutions guarantee long-term success and profitability.“Remodeling and renovation,upgrading and expansion of existing golf courses receive equal consideration with new golf projects,”according to Ramsey.The firm’s partners recently sat down with Asian Golf Business to discuss their operations in the region. Judgement Day – Understanding Club Culture Pg40 “I’m a Secret Shopper – not a professional mind you.No training needed. But secret. Unannounced. Like everyone who walks in your front door. You may not think we’re“secret shoppers.” Filling in a scorecard. But we are. And I’m looking,soaking it all in,assigning numbers to experience. In my head. Evaluating and Judging.”An interesting insight to club management by Gregg Patterson. ANNOUNCEMENTS  Banyan Golf Club Turns Five in Grand Style  Schmidt-Curley Breaks into Myanmar!  Bernhard Grinders New International Sales Manager Pg18-19 Pg12 04/05MARCH 2014
  5. 5. Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News CONTENTS MARCH 201406/07 CLUB LEADER Stepping Out in Style Pg48 Asian Golf Business looks at Stewart Lee King See,Head of Golf at the 27-hole Orchid Country Club in Singapore who has spent all his life working for a club and he shares his thoughts on delivering the ideal club experience to members.An all-new column on various occupations within the club industry CLUB MANAGEMENT Systems for Success – Planning for Success! Pg52 The business of golf is a complicated one,and although developing a plan is not a guarantee for success,it will provide a road map that everyone can use.If created effectively,and if it’s aligned with your goals and objectives,it should make the road travelled that much smoother and you should reach your desired destination that much quicker.James Cronk shares his thoughts on this vital topic. PRUSA’S POINT Improving Your Business Communication Skills Pg56 James Prusa reminds us all that the lack of confidence in communication skills impedes the ability to obtain resources or to convince executive/ownership of real needs and financial requirements.These weaknesses also show up in a failure to effectively communicate to co-workers and to subordinate staff.Owners of golf courses deserve better. BUSINESS OF GOLF WITH MIKE ORLOFF The New Dimensions to Golf Membership Marketing Pg62 If we get to know more about the people we want to market to,we can devise new, more specific,strategies and products to attract them and more importantly retain them longer.Golf marketing Specialist,Mike Orloff presents his thoughts. MODERN MARVEL Simulators: The Future of Golf Pg68 NEWS, NEWS, NEWS ...  CMAA Introduces New Team for 2014 Pg76  Troon International Facilities Shine Pg78  Laguna Lang Co Is A Big Hit! Pg80  Rio is Moving But the Pace is Worrying! Pg82  Jacobsen’s Mowing Power! Pg84 ISSUE #62, MARCH 2014 – TEAM DYNAMICS Pg48 Pg56 Pg68 "Simulators make a lot of sense in Asia. Golf courses are few in numbers, usually far away, often private, and very expensive. Golf simulators can bring the game of golf to the masses, where technology is usually well-embraced by the Asian public."
  6. 6. Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News It's all your fault ... How do you get a dream team? We all need suggestions for development – personal and professional development. When it comes to your team, if they aren't producing the way you'd like, it's because you're not being the boss they need. Now this isn't an accusation, as much as it is an observation. Most employees have a hard time coming to the boss and telling him/her the operation could be better. They've been trained to respect your decisions and aren't sure what words to use when inspiring ideas occur to them. To be an effective leader, one needs to continually look for new ways to discover excellence in every part of his or her team and operation. BUILDING A D COVER STORY BY JESSICA GLIDEWELL – Senior Consultant, Profitable Food Facilities
  7. 7. MARCH 2014 08/09 DREAM TEAM!First you want to understand what each person needs to grow and develop within your team. It will take some time and effort to realize that with each person. Being at the top, You are the coach that will see what the potential is in your team, especially when they don't see it in themselves. Many times we forget to be the mentor to our team, day to day operations take up a lot of time and energy. One of the biggest motivating factors for anyone is achievement in professional goals. Being able to see the evidence, that your dream has become reality, is what gives a certain and real satisfaction to us all. Now let's take a look at what it means to be a motivator. I like to think of it more as inspiring than motivating, because when you're inspired there is no lack of enthusiasm. When you are inspired the job seems simple and easy to do, so it usually is done quickly. Now, at a golf club there will be a constant, steady stream of occurrences(jobs) that need attention. Jobs that will require your team, and if they are not inspired, then the job will seem like a chore and not be welcomed. If you find yourself talking to yourself saying "why can't he/she do it like I do?" then you're definitely not leading by example. And this is the 'only' way to get things done the way you want them done. Never WATCH HOW AN F1 PIT CREWWORKS
  8. 8. Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News10/11 MARCH 2014 expect someone to know what to do, instead rely on your ability to give clear and simple direction to get the intended results. No one else will make what you want to happen – happen, they are not you and therefore need your vision. It is crucial to maintain an atmosphere of personal and professional growth with training/development within your team for maximum performance. We can't expect them to know it all, but we can have education and training so they will know what's required. Professional growth will expand your whole operation, on every level, that's why it's so important to have a training regimen that is solid. Oftentimes the people on our team are only there for a paycheck and not very full of life. They will come to work and fill a spot with a warm body. While it is nice to have a body - a dream team needs more! Take a look at your team in with a new perspective. Every person you have on your roster is an opportunity to create the ideal teammate. In my observation I've seen many people promoted within without any proper training for their specific position. It is very challenging to know what to do without guidance, don't make the mistake of letting the successor go in unprepared. I've often wondered ... Why should we have to walk around and get our bearings when taking on a new COVER STORY BY JESSICA GLIDEWELL – Senior Consultant, Profitable Food Facilities position at a club? Why couldn't there be a manual on how to work this particular operation with all the peculiarities identified? It is critical for communication to be timely and delivered to each level so there is no lack of concrete understanding. Being involved, knowing what's going on at work makes everyone feel more secure. It also gives your team members the opportunity to bring thoughts and ideas to the table. Communication can be done in large groups or small but I've found one on one meetings to be the most reliable, I can tell if you are listening or not if it's just you and I. With a constant and transparent communication you will build confidence and trust within your team. People will be open and fully self expressed rather than withdrawn and waiting for commands. It will encourage the presence of leaders within your team, making your job so much easier. Regularly your team wants to know what you know but doesn't ask you out of respect for your position and fear of stepping on toes. The way to begin the journey for employee buy in starts with simple conversation. Get to know the people in your community, you will know what it takes to be inspiring(get buy in) once you have the personal connection. The every day job at your Club can become fun and exciting, with everyone wanting to be at work. Personal growth brings a community together in a tighter bond. By creating job satisfaction within your team, you will be able to retain your team for longer periods of time, although sometimes being in one place too long can be stifling so don't be afraid to move. Using strong team building exercises effectively increases morale and performance as well as brings camaraderie and fun to the operation. Implementing systems for recognition of performance and utilizing organized goal fulfillment structures will produce an 'on the team' spirit and job loyalty from every person on the team. Buy in doesn't always involve money, although we need our paychecks, most people are happy with recognition and a higher level of understanding as a motivator. I promise that if you take the time and put in the effort to really get to know your team, you will start to see results you would not believe. By understanding what inspires the people in your team, you will be able to get the buy in you need for any undertaking. Instilling the highest standards for training in your operation will give your team the knowledge base needed for your success. Really communicate with everyone in a way that they feel connected and you will have the most loyal people and be known as the place to work. The best part is that this is so simple and doable - why wouldn't you do it? And if you are ... Don't stop now and teach others what you are doing!!
  9. 9. Professional Recognition For The Club Manager Has Finally Arrived In Asia! ASIA PACIFIC CHAPTER ASIA PACIFIC CHAPTER www.cmaa-asia.com cmaa.asia@cmaa-asia.com Take the bold decision to become an active member of the Asia Pacific Chapter of the Club Managers Association of America. Act Now! Download the application form and fax it to us for processing. The Asia Pacific Chapter of the Club Managers Association of America Advancing The Profession of Club Management ASIA PACIFIC CHAPTER If you are a golf club manager anywhere in the Asia Pacific, you can now become a proud member of the most prestigious association representing your profession – the Asia Pacific Chapter of the Club Managers Association of America. The Club Managers Association of America (CMAA) is the professional Association for managers of membership clubs. CMAA has close to 6,500 members across all classifications. Our manager members operate more than 2,500 country, golf, athletic, city, faculty, military, town and yacht clubs. The objectives of the Association are to encourage the education and advancement of members and to assist club officers and members, through their managers, to secure the utmost in efficient and successful operations. CMAA provides its members with the expertise to deliver an exceptional club experience that fulfills the unexpressed needs and desires of its members and guests consistent with their lifestyles. We enhance our members' success by offering professional leadership development, ethical standards and responsive services. This mission is accomplished through the following strategic priorities:  Providing state-of-the-art educational programmes;  Representing the members to allied associations, club members and a broader public; and  Providing unique information and resources that increase member performance and career potential. Suite 06-06, Hong Aik Building, 22 Kallang Avenue, Singapore 339413 Contact: Mike Sebastian +65 9152 8162 (Mobile) ©Bruce Mathews
  10. 10. Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News 87th CMAA World Conference & Club Business Expo SPECIAL EVENT 87th CMAA World Conference Displays OptimismFor almost a whole week in February, some 2000 executives from the club industrycongregatedintheNorthAmericanresortcityofOrlandofortheannual World Conference hosted by the Club Managers Association of America.
  11. 11. MARCH 2014 12/13 Staged at the sprawling Orlando World Centre Marriott from February 4 – 8,  club managers from America and Canada, Europe, South America, Asia and Australia networked and participated in various sessions. This enthusiasm was most noticeable at the International Symposium, a popular workshop that provided perspectives on global club management problems and solutions.   Some of the world’s best education seminars and workshops took place at the World Conference, with multiple colossal halls filled to the brim with club managers, all eager to learn about how they can improve their operation. Apart from learning new skills and benchmarking existing knowledge, the seminars and workshops made one think differently about club management. Key speakers asked questions and made statements that gave delegates a different perspective on problems club managers are constantly battling.   The dynamic itinerary featured more than 70 education sessions with  approximately 47 percent new speakers. Attendees engaged with speakers such as:   Pat Williams, Senior Vice President of the Orlando Magic, presented the first General Education Session; Charles Hazlewood. Award- winning British Conductor and founder of the British Paraorchestra, was featured at the second General Session and Bo Jackson, retired All-Star baseball and football player, closed out the event at the Awards and Conference Finale.   The 88th World Conference will be held in San Antonio, Texas on March 8 – 12, 2015. "Some of the world’s best education seminars and workshops took place at the World Conference, with multiple colossal halls filled to the brim with club managers, all eager to learn about how they can improve their operation... Key speakers asked questions and made statements that gave delegates a different perspective on problems club managers are constantly battling." Watch VIDEO Highlights of the Event. To View All Photos Click here
  12. 12. 2014 Golf INDUSTRY SHOW BRUCE WILLIAMS THE GOLF SAGE
  13. 13. MARCH 2014 This event is held annually in the USA but draws people from all around the world. GCSAA reaches out to the many international friends and members across the globe. An international lounge is always filled with people from around the world as a place to meet and greet. From my perspective I was able to chat with a number of people working in Asia and also Asian companies either doing business with American companies or wanting to become distributors of products and services. by the Numbers ... Oneofthebestwaystosensethesuccessofashowofthismagnitudeisbycapturing andanalyzingthenumbers. Herearethemostimportantindicators:  Attendance was 14,147 which is an 8% increase over 2013  Educational seats sold for seminars were 5,192 over the short week and that is an increase of 15% over 2013  There were 6,845 qualified buyers (people making decisions for purchases or expenditures) and that is a 14% increase over 2013  561 companies exhibited at the GIS and that is a 9% increase 184,500 sq. ft. of booth space was sold and again an increase of 7% over 2013. It is obvious that numbers were up and soon attendee surveys will tell GCSAA what members liked or what they felt needed improvement. These stats indicate a positive direction for the GIS and also mark an upward trend after seeing 5 or more years of decline that mirrored the US Economy, golf courses opened, and rounds of golf played. THE MOOD The mood of the attendees was very positive. In years past there seemed to be a question as to whether or not the golf industry had reached the bottom of a downward trend. Most have put that behind them and made the appropriate corrections in the marketplace and are now focused on moving forward in what is considered“The New Normal”for golf in the USA. Golf courses are beginning to spend money on much needed capital improvements. Many courses had put expenditures on equipment on the back burner and now many operations are back on track with the needed equipment replacement programs and updating of infrastructure that resulted in significant deferred maintenance scenarios. ThefirstweekofFebruarymarkedtheannualpilgrimageofgolfcoursesuperintendents and industry related people to the Golf Industry Show in Orlando, Florida USA. For years I have thought of this event as “The Greatest Show onTurf” but it also transcends that as it covers all facets of golf course operations. The show is run by the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America (GCSAA) but it is also a time and place for the American Society of Golf Course Architects, National Golf Course Owners, Golf Course Builders Association of America, the United States Golf Association, the National Golf Foundation and the Society of Golf Course Appraisers. Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News 14/15 AnnikaSorenstam
  14. 14. 2014 Golf INDUSTRY SHOW Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News BRUCE WILLIAMS THE GOLF SAGE Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News "Even though the buzz was positive there are still a lot of challenges facing the golf industry our lessons of overbuilding. We must work endlessly to promote the game and provide a various means to keep the game strong. Affordability is a major challenge in that golf nee and not just the affluent. Superintendents have never been more challenged to provide m important but being fiscally and environmentally responsible will be the greatest assets and and beyond." "Golf courses are beginning to spend money on much needed capital improvements. Many equipment on the back burnerand now many operations are back on track with the needed e and updating of infrastructure that resulted in significant deferred maintenance scenarios superintendents were all very positive and upbeat about the direction golf is headed. During it was a unanimous affirmation that golf is recovering quite nicely."
  15. 15. MARCH 2014 16/17 Manufacturers, distributors and superintendents were all very positive and upbeat about the direction golf is headed. During the week the vibe was good and it was a unanimous affirmation that golf is recovering quite nicely. CHALLENGES Even though the buzz was positive there are still a lot of challenges facing the golf industry in the USA. We must learn from our lessons of overbuilding. We must work endlessly to promote the game and provide an influx of new golfers through various means to keep the game strong. Affordability is a major challenge in that golf needs to be available to the masses and not just the affluent. Superintendents have never been more challenged to provide more with less. Growing grass is important but being fiscally and environmentally responsible will be the greatest assets and skills of the superintendent now and beyond. FUTURE DIRECTION OF THE TURF INDUSTRY Inordertomeetthecurrentneedsoftheindustryitwillbenecessaryfor superintendentstobecomemoreeducatedthaneverbefore. Grassgrowingskills cannolongerbethesoleskillrequiredforemployment.Itwillbeimportantfor superintendentstohaveskillsin:  Business  Scheduling  Labor relations  Management  Training  Fleet Management  Thorough understanding of Laws and Regulations  Competitive Purchasing  Strong communications  Technological competence  Not only a basic education but never ending ongoing education as well SUMMARY Hats off to Rhett Evans, CEO of GCSAA, and his team for putting on a stellar show in Orlando. The overall event certainly rated an A on my report card. Like most events of this magnitude the team is working on plans for the next event to be held in San Antonio, TX February 21-26, 2014. This is a must attend event. While it can be expensive for anyone in Asia to attend I can make the case for an excellent return on investment for the time and money spent. For a cost of about $2000 US there are a variety of educational sessions that are free and more that are available at a low cost. These sessions have the best educators and practitioners in the business to share their knowledge and also to help educate the industry on how to solve problems on their golf courses. It is still important for the Asian Golf Industry to attend and support their local events but take my advice and consider an occasional trip across the pond to see“The Greatest Show on Turf”! y in the USA. We must learn from an influx of new golfers through eds to be available to the masses more with less. Growing grass is d skills of the superintendent now courses had put expenditures on equipment replacement programs s. Manufacturers, distributors and g the week the vibe was good and
  16. 16. ANNOUNCEMENTS Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News GENERAL NEWS In just five years Banyan Golf Club in Hua Hin Thailand has won both international awards and many friends to become one of the top courses in Asia. The list of VIP’s who took part in the club’s 5th Anniversary tournament in February showed the club’s ability to attract golfers, celebrities and politicians to this popular Hua Hin club. The governor of the Tourism Authority of Thailand, Thawatchai Arunyik, spoke to the 200 guests after playing in the 5th anniversary tournament, and praised the management for creating a superb golfing experience, which he said was a credit to Thailand’s golfing experience. Golf course architect Pirapon Namatra and Smith Obayawat, Principal Clubhouse architect (OBA) have achieved the perfect blend of a challenging 18 holes across some beautiful countryside. Pirapon Namatra and his company Golf East have built and renovated over thirty courses, including the Banyan, Singha Park and the Santiburi courses plus renovations including Blue Canyon and Alpine. Namatra said‘I am currently building the new Waterside golf course at Siam Country Club in Pattaya, however I have many fond memories of creating Banyan which we actually complete in just 18 months. It’s a beautiful piece of land, and I think the final product is proof of that.’ Namatra added,‘The owner didn’t want us to touch any of the trees so we left them alone too. All but one, the big Banyan tree that was in Banyan Golf Club Turns Five In Grand Style the middle of the 10th fairway which we moved about 50m to the left. Perhaps one of the highlights is driving along to the course and seeing the magnificent club house overlooking the front nine holes. Designed by famed architect Smith Obayawat, Principal Clubhouse architect (OBA) who has also created several iconic projects including the So Sofitel and K Village in Bangkok and the Thai Consulate in Guangzhou. ‘Our Thai style clubhouse has been awarded several international awards, including winning Best Clubhouse in Asia Pacific for two consecutive years, which were very gratifying. The location is beautiful and the weather is always nice in Hua Hin, and thanks to the owners they allowed me to exercise my imagination,‘said Obayawat. The Dutch based owners are continually looking at ways to improve the golf club and their 75 villa Banyan Resort. But perhaps the biggest success has been the dedicated behind the scenes work headed by General Manager Stacey Walton and Stuart Daly Director of Operations. After just 12 months of opening the club was recognized as the“Best New Course in Asia Pacific”in 2010 by Asian Golf Monthly, and has continued to collect a number of awards annually. General Manager Walton said,‘The demand for golf in Hua Hin is still growing and our long term plan, using land we own adjacent to the current course, would be to eventually create a sister course with the same natural feel of the Banyan, but a bit different in character.’ "Golf course architect Pirapon Namatra and Smith Obayawat, Principal Clubhouse architect (OBA) have achieved the perfect blend of a challenging 18 holes across some beautiful countryside. Pirapon Namatra and his company Golf East have built and renovated over thirty courses, including the Banyan, Singha Park and the Santiburi courses plus renovations including Blue Canyon and Alpine." From Left: Stacey Walton (Director GLS), Khun Thawatchai Trunyik, Governor of the Tourist Authority of Thailand (TAT) and Stuart Daly (Director GLS)
  17. 17.  18/19MARCH 2014 Nixon, a Bernhard team member since 2001, will be based at the company’s Rugby, U.K. headquarters and assume responsibility for all worldwide sales and marketing activities. “Our growing sales and re-energized focus on customer support demanded reallocation of management team responsibilities,”Stephen Bernhard, Executive Chairman of Bernhard and Company.“Steve will call upon the three years he spent for us in Florida to guide Gary Ray and the U.S. sales team, while also overseeing Bernhard initiatives in Asia and Europe.” Well known by the professional golf tours worldwide as the premier blade sharpening machines, Bernhard Grinders ensure maintenance equipment at daily-fee, private, resort and municipal courses is always in ideal cutting condition. They are favored by course superintendents, owners and operators for their precise cut, ease of use, reliability, safety- first design, value proposition and more. BernhardGrinders NEWInternationalSalesManagerBernhard and Company has named Steve Nixon International Sales Manager “Steve will call upon the three years he spent for us in Florida to guide Gary Ray and the U.S. sales team, while also overseeing Bernhard initiatives in Asia and Europe.” Steve Nixon It’s official – the fast emerging Republic of the Union of Myanmar is all set to start work on the construction of a world class golf course. The plum job of designing and building this premier project has been landed by Schmidt-Curley Design (SCD), headquartered in Scottsdale, Arizona. This win is further acknowledgement of the company’s world ranking and the quality of work that it delivers. SCD has been recognised as the top golf course architect in the Asia Pacific region for the past few years and has walked away with top honours at the annual Asian Golf Monthly Awards presented by the Asia Pacific Golf Group. The new project is the Mandalay Myotha Golf Club which will be located southwest of Mandalay, the last royal capital of Myanmar, widely regarded as the hub of Myanmar’s culture its commercial and business activities. “The layout of the new course will include an 8,000-yard championship golf course along with a full service driving range and golf academy,”according to Lee Schmidt, principal of SCD. He went on to add,“An innovative design will take full advantage of the site’s dramatic terrain, with golf holes playing along deep river canyons and fairways routed through a vast rolling landscape.” The par-72 layout will be designed with Kyi Hla Han a former professional golfer and executive chairman the Asian Tour.“As the layout is set to play host to international events, Kyi Hla will provide valuable input on the course design to help produce a stern test for today’s best players,”said Schmidt. In addition to a state-of-the-art 18-hole golf course, this 11,000-acre project will include schools, hospitals, factories, warehouses, small businesses, parks, and various residential components able to accommodate an estimated population of 250,000 people. Golf course construction is projected to begin in the middle of 2014 with a grand opening planned for late 2015. Schmidt-Curley Breaks Into Myanmar!
  18. 18. Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News special Feature BY Paul Reeves & Phil Ryan – Pacific Coast Design In magazine articles and at Industry events across the world you often hear that India is set to become the next China in terms of golf development. PCD has been Site Planning and designing golf courses in India since 1993 and have so far completed 15 golf projects around India so when we were asked to do an article on the Indian Golf market we wanted it to reflect what was actually happening. As comparisons to China seem to be the norm we thought it best to look at a few points of difference also. Golf in India What is the market?
  19. 19. MARCH 2014 22/23 "In China the Communist Party of China owns all of the land in urban areas through the Local Governments. So if you’re a Developer and you want to put up a private residential / resort project, you have to purchase the land from the local government. What you purchase is actually a land lease.You purchase the rights to use the land for up to 70 years for residential development. In India the land is privately owned and Developers need to arrange purchase of the land directly from individuals." Those of us who are involved in the development of golf in Asia know that China has gone from zero to nearly six hundred golf courses in 30 years and is set to be a major player in world golf within the not too distant future. Golf in China has developed very much along the American model with large 18 hole golf courses of an average 60 ha (150 acres +), clubhouses and villa development being the norm. There has been little deviation from the China golf model with virtually no smaller or nine hole golf projects being developed which is quite a contrast to Indian golf development. India has had golf courses for over 80 years and in the past 30 years has had only 49 new golf courses built. The majority of such new golf courses have been developed very much under the“Indian model” being a hybrid of British, American and Indian influences with the average 18 hole golf course area being under 48 ha (120 acres). The size of the average golf course is not the only differentiation with China though as around half of the 45 golf projects constructed in India are smaller nine hole or Par 3 golf products. The point should be made that while land area for golf in the two countries and the type of golf product varies significantly the majority of all golf projects in both countries are linked to residential development. It is obvious to those who have worked in India that these two major Asian powers have very different golf markets, and there are a number of factors that have led to this very different development scenario for golf in India. Firstly, India has actual land area of 2,973,193 sq km while China has actual land area of 9,569,901 sq km which is more than triple India’s. GDP – per capita (purchasing power parity) in India is US$3,900 (2012) while in China it is US$9,300 (2012 – World Bank) which is more than double India’s. In China the Communist Party of China owns all of the land in urban areas through the Local Governments. So if you’re a Developer and you want to put up a private residential / resort project, you have to purchase the land from the local government. What you purchase is actually a land lease. You purchase the rights to use the land for up to 70 years for residential development. In India the land is privately
  20. 20. Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News special Feature BY Paul Reeves & Phil Ryan – Pacific Coast Design KEVIN RAMSEY owned and Developers need to arrange purchase of the land directly from individuals. Following India’s independence in 1947, land reforms were undertaken by the new and successive Governments that included three major aspects (a) abolition of the intermediaries (b) tenancy reform and (c) the redistribution of land, using land ceilings were undertaken. The outcome of such reforms led to many former tenants and farmers gaining ownership of land but in many, often very small holdings. These land reform programs, increasing population and a better economy have led to land parcels diminishing in size / area and thus making land accumulation for a potential residential or golf project a more difficult task. What may have started as a small to medium farm area, after a few generations with such land being divided among surviving children and then their children, many very small parcels of land is the result (often only a few acres), or land with many registered owners. As of today (it is changing) in many Indian States there is no central registry of land holding titles and many records of land ownership are on bits of paper with vague references to actual site conditions. As an example, one of PCD’s first residential / resort projects in India accumulated 202 ha (500 acres) of land and to do this had to get signatures of over 4,200 persons, many of whom now lived in distant parts of India or even overseas. Obviously such a process did take many years and even when we started the project we had “outparcels”within the site, small areas of land that did not belong to the Developer that we had to avoid. To this day this is still a common issue for most Developers. Land acquisition processes have improved in India over the past five years with many State Governments implementing township policies, that is regulations covering land for residential type projects over 40.5 ha (100 acres) in size. Such legislation normally sets out minimum areas for recreational“open space”to which a potential golf course may fit into and this may vary between 20 to 45% of the property. Land may be compulsory acquired by Government and legislation has just been put in place outlining the requirements for compensation, resettlement and social impact. The Right to Fair Compensation and Transparency in Land Acquisition, Rehabilitation and Resettlement Act, stipulates mandatory consent of at least 70% of affected people for acquiring land for Public Private Partnership (PPP) projects and 80% for acquiring land for private companies. However being a democratic country, social activism is very strong in India and everyone is entitled to take an issue to Court which may then involve many, many years of legal argument, mainly due to the current slow pace of India’s overworked legal system in relation to such matters. The economic situation also comes into the equation with the cost of land in India increasing exponentially as both the population increase adds pressure for housing and many more Indians have an increasing amount of disposable income, leading to more speculative investing in land. The ownership of land has always been a significant status Golf Development in India 2013 DOWNLOAD PDF AlistofallthegolfprojectsdoneinIndia includingall15current(2013)projects. APARTMENT COMPARISON RESEARCH DOWNLOAD PDF PCDComparisonchartofinvestmentreturn ongolfrelatedApartmentprojectsinNoida comparedtosimilarnon-golfApartments. "With space being at a premium within new residential apartment developments, if there is a golf course planned then the golf course is usually a 9 hole or Par 3 golf course, the views are still golf and the courses are a great place for beginners to learn or the expert to hone their all important, short game skills. Such golf related apartment projects are coming up all around India but the first such examples came from the Jaypee Greens Golf in Greater Noida a few years ago, these have been so successful that the JPGroup has completed another project in Noida (Wishtown)." "Given the above land related issues it is not surprising that out of the fifteen current golf projects in India (under construction as of December 2013) only two have no residential component (remote golf situations), only three are 18 hole golf projects with a golf area of more than 40.5 ha (100 Acres) and the balance are either nine hole or Par 3 golf projects mostly associated with Apartment style developments. All of these smaller golf courses have both membership (from the residential) and green fee play making them quite accessible."
  21. 21. MARCH 2014 24/25 symbol in India and now with the economy doing well over the past ten years many Indians have the opportunity to invest. China’s population is larger than India’s at the moment, but India’s population is expected to surpass China’s by 2025 (World Bank, 2012). The population increases are putting real pressure on infrastructure around Indian cities which unfortunately is simply not keeping up with the pace of population growth / requirement for new dwellings. Without the required infrastructure, Developers often cannot move outside of the fringes of major urban areas or newly planned urban zones, both of which have high land values and make providing land for recreational purposes like a golf course as a part of any proposed project a very expensive option. Due to the excellent infrastructure in China, Developers can look to do villa type residential / resort golf projects well outside urban areas, with investors still able to link into the urban business community nearby. In India many Developers have to stay closer to the existing infrastructure and are tending to go upwards with many golf projects now being set among high rise apartments. The investment in land does not stop at the domestic market either, many educated Indians have done very well in business in the USA, UK, Asia or the Middle East and they are also investing in land in India, which in turn adds more pressure to prices. Given the above land related issues it is not surprising that out of the fifteen current golf projects in India (under construction as of December 2013) only two have no residential component (remote golf situations), only three are 18 hole golf projects with a golf area of more than 40.5 ha (100 Acres) and the balance are either nine hole or Par 3 golf projects mostly associated with Apartment style developments. All of these smaller golf courses have both membership (from the residential) and green fee play making them quite accessible. With space being at a premium within new residential apartment developments, if there is a golf course planned then the golf course is usually a 9 hole or Par 3 golf course, the views are still golf and the courses are a great place for beginners to learn or the expert to hone their all important, short game skills. Such golf related apartment projects are coming up all around India but the first such examples came from the Jaypee Greens Golf in Greater Noida a few years ago, these have been so successful that the JP Group has completed another project in Noida (Wishtown). Now other cities around India are getting in on the act. In Delhi the new Ambience Caitriona apartments overlook a Par 3, nine hole golf course, Unitech Karma Lakelands (Gurgaon) has apartments being developed with a view over the full 9 hole golf course. In Noida the Unitech Country Club has apartments nearing completion which overlook the 9 hole championship style golf course. Several new projects are coming up in this area also with 9 hole / Par 3 golf courses associated with the community Club facilities. In Chennai the Aavisa township with currently a nine hole golf course (18 holes planned) has (167.3 acres) of apartments planned. The Hirco ThePar3,nineholePCDdesigned BlueRidgeGolfsetamongthe Apartmenttowers.
  22. 22. ThePCDdesigned18holeOxfordGolfCourseinPune, votedthebestgolfcourseinIndiaatAsiaGolfSummit, November2013.
  23. 23. "India, like China has and will continue to develop world class International standard 18 hole golf courses but we get the feeling that the large number of accessible smaller golf facilities in India may well lay the foundation for a more sustainable growth of golfers in India over the longer term."
  24. 24. Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club NewsFEBRUARY 2014 special Feature 28/29 BY Paul Reeves & Phil Ryan – Pacific Coast Design Palace Gardens with a 9 hole golf course has apartments already completed with residents moving in. In Pune the Blue Ridge Apartment project (Paranjape Schemes) at Hinjewadi has its 9 hole / Par 3 golf course and golf academy completed with all the apartment purchasers able to see the view from existing towers. Outside of Mumbai, Indiabulls has a new project at Savroli with an 18 hole / Par 3 golf course and apartments which is under construction. In Navi Mumbai apartment towers overlooking the new 18 hole Kharghar Valley Golf Course are capitalizing on the CIDCO constructed public golf course with CIDCO also planning future apartments within the golf course. This is not to say that such apartment / small golf style projects are the only golf happening in India. Kolkata has a planned 18 hole golf course (GreenTech City) with villas and apartments and another (Calcutta Riverside) 9 hole course with both villas and apartments. In Mysore, the 18 hole Eagleburg Golf project of Par 72, 7300 yards in length has already commenced construction and have villas under development with apartments overlooking the golf planned for its third phase. The 18 hole golf projects in Bangalore (Golfshire & Clover Greens) completed over the past few years have only villas for sale which is going away from the trend but the newer projects planned will likely all include some apartments. Even the new 9 hole residential / Kimmane resort golf course under construction in the regional city of Shimoga (Karnataka) has eight apartment towers planned for its phase 4. Do the“Indian model”/ smaller golf course / Apartment style projects give the added return on investment that is normally expected of residential golf projects in other parts of the world? Well PCD undertook research on villa and apartment sales in six major cities around India in mid 2013 and this confirms such investment returns. Reviewing the price differences / statistics between the apartments within golf projects and similar standard (bedrooms, area, level & amenities) apartments nearby or closer to the main city we found that in Pune, a golf facing apartment will achieve a minimum additional 22% (Rs/ft2) price over non golf apartments. In Noida the actual percentage increases to around 60% to 80% (Rs/ ft2) price over non golf apartments, which gives real weight to the theory that the golf view apartments give a greater return. India is a different golf market to China in relation to golf projects and it will be interesting to see over the next ten years how this impacts on the quality of International golfers coming out of each country as well as the general growth of golfer numbers. India, like China has and will continue to develop world class International standard 18 hole golf courses but we get the feeling that the large number of accessible smaller golf facilities in India may well lay the foundation for a more sustainable growth of golfers in India over the longer term. PCDDirectorsPaulReeves(left) &PhilRyan
  25. 25. Banyan is your Number OneLifestyle Golf and Resort Destination in Thailand Banyan is a premium resort with an 18- hole championship golf course www.banyanthailand.com IT’S ABSOLUTELY PERFECT The great escape for golfers and families Resort booking@banyanthailand.com facebook.com/BanyanTheResortHuaHin +66 (0)3253 8888 Golf reservations@banyanthailand.com facebook.com/BanyanGolfClubHuaHin +66 (0)3261 6200 BEST COURSE IN THAILAND, 2ND RUNNER UP BEST CLUB HOUSE IN ASIA PACIFIC, WINNER BEST PRO SHOP IN ASIA PACIFIC, TOP 10
  26. 26. Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News FOCUS ON GOLFPLAN special Feature "There are definitely some spots through Southeast Asia that are due or overdue for renovation. A lot has changed in the last 20-25 years both within the design and construction of golf courses and the technological advancements in equipment that have virtually made all fairway bunkering done at that time irrelevant." Golfplan Spreading Its Art & Science In The Region
  27. 27. MARCH 2014 A partnership that requires very little introduction to the golf industry in the Asia Pacific is a company called Golfplan. This is a company that prides itself in its belief that golf course architecture is a combination of Art and Science. “With more than three decades of experience, Golfplan combines the art of creative golf course architecture with technically exacting construction working drawings and the modern science of turfgrass agronomics and maintenance,”is how David Dale, president and principal of the company describes the firm. Kevin Ramsey, principal and vice president added by saying,“Golf course architecture with Golfplan brings environmental awareness, focus on the end-user market, comprehensive construction working drawings and hands-on construction services.” According to Ramsey, regardless of whether the completed project is a resort, residential golf community, daily fee course or municipal golf course, the firm’s unique design solutions guarantee long-term success and profitability.“Remodeling and renovation, upgrading and expansion of existing golf courses receive equal consideration with new golf projects,”he said. 30/31 ThepartnersrecentlysatdownwithAsianGolfBusinesstodiscusstheiroperationsintheregionandthe followingareexcerptsfromthatdiscussion: ASIANGOLFBUSINESS:GolfplanhavebeenbusywithtwoprojectsinthePhilippines–GiventheupsurgeinthePhilippineeconomy, doyouseeamatchingsurgeinthedevelopmentofnewgolfcoursesinthecountry? GOLFPLAN: Yes, the Philippine economy has been robust and steady. However, with this being said we are not seeing a huge demand for golf. We happen to be working with a highly respected residential developer that is making a push into a leisure development and therefore we are seeing golf as one of the amenities being offered. "The most challenging market is India due to the challenges to assemble enough land and water for the projects. Singapore has great possibilities for renovation provided the clubs are prepared to reposition their courses. A few of these courses are really fantastic hidden gems waiting to be rediscovered."
  28. 28. Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News FOCUS ON GOLFPLAN special Feature ThePhilippineshasalonghistoryingolfanditlookslikenew glorydaysareaheadforthecountryinsofarasgolfisconcerned. WhatisyourvisionforgolfinthePhilippines? We are definitely not seeing a return to a boom time. There are select pockets for growth, primarily leisure/second home real estate driven to add value. The golf must be sustainable both environmentally and financially. Site selection and good planning allows this to happen. Anvaya Cove Golf & Sports Club is an excellent model of this. We work hand in hand with the owner's team to find the best solution that creates a great golf experience while adding the greatest value to the development. YouhavespentagreatdealoftimeinSouthKorea–giveusan assessmentofthecurrentstateandmoodforthedevelopmentof golfcoursesinthatcountry? There remains a strong demand for Public Golf however there is an issue as it relates to affordable green fees since the economy and the sustainable middle class leisure time has diminished. Location and demographics is key to the survival for many clubs near Seoul, Daegu, Gwangu, Daegu and Jeju during these challenging times. Our activity with new course design work has been all about Public Golf. Nearly every job we have currently under design is public. This is the next logical step. The private membership market has topped out for the time being and there is a natural demand for public access by society with passion to play. The key to the success of this model is land cost and site selection and how it relates to demographics and construction cost. There’salotoftalkthatSouthKorea’sgolfdevelopmentis showingsignsoftankingandthatitwillfollowapathofdecline verysimilartowhathappenedinJapan.Doyousubscribetothis? We do not envision a total tank but there has definitely been a decline. There are a lot of parallels that can be drawn to the Japanese market. Membership sales are nearly non-existent. Bankruptcies are ongoing with 20 plus golf facilities in receivership. Private Clubs that came onto the market in the last two to three years are trying to hold on with the play they receive during these past summer months but it won’t be enough to sustain the operations so many of these clubs are converting the operational status with the government from Private to Public Golf Clubs. Renovation–againGolfplanseemstobedevotingagooddeal ofitstimetorenovationofgolfcourses.Let’stalkaboutthisfora while–SoutheastAsiaseemstopresentitselfasagoldminefor renovationespeciallywhenyouconsiderthatmanyofthenewer coursesarenowreaching20and25yearsinageandareripefor majormake-overs.Whatareyourthoughtsonthis? There are definitely some spots through Southeast Asia that are due or overdue for renovation. A lot has changed in the last 20-25KEVIN RAMSEY
  29. 29. MARCH 2014 32/33 years both within the design and construction of golf course and the technological advancements in equipment that have virtually made all fairway bunkering done at the time irrelevant. Giventhechallengesoflandacquisitionandthehighcostof landanddevelopmentintheregion,wouldn’tyouagreethat renovatinggolfcoursesisano-brainer? Absolutely. These courses are far better located then most new course proposed locations. There are always some developers with large land holdings that will still have new courses open up in key locations but these will be more the exception. Weseethatyouhavebeenactiveinsomerenovationprojectsin theUnitedStates.Isthisatangiblesignthatgolfisshowingsigns ofcomingoutofthedoldrumsinNorthAmerica? Survival for most architects in the US has revolved around remodel and renovation. There has been little new construction for the past "Private Clubs that came onto the market in the last two to three years are trying to hold on with the play they receive during these past summer months but it won’t be enough to sustain the operations so many of these clubs are converting the operational status with the government from Private to Public Golf Clubs." PineBeachGolfLinks inHaenamKorea.
  30. 30. dAVID DALE
  31. 31. "Survival for most architects in the US has revolved around remodel and renovation. There has been little new construction for the past 4 years. We continue to see small to medium renovation projects usually phased over 1-3 years depending on the scope of work. The budgets for renovation works have been small for green renovations, bunker repositioning or restoration along with irrigation system upgrading. Typical projects well under a million dollars are the norm. There is the exception like any mature golf market where a club will undergo a major rebuild for a new appearance and character that is intended to maintain and capture new membership."
  32. 32. Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News FOCUS ON GOLFPLAN special Feature 4 years. We continue to see small to medium renovation projects usually phased over 1-3 years depending on the scope of work. The budgets for renovation works have been small for green renovations, bunker repositioning or restoration along with irrigation system upgrading. Typical projects well under a million dollars are the norm. There is the exception like any mature golf market where a club will undergo a major rebuild for a new appearance and character that is intended to maintain and capture new membership. Let’sdiscussChina–whereisthisgiantnationgoingasfarasgolf isconcerned?Hasthedevelopmentofnewcoursespeakedand isthereafuturefornewcoursedevelopment,especiallycourses thatarenotdependentonbeingproppedupbyrealestate development? Golf community master planning is ongoing. Approval process for these projects is a bit of a mystery as the story is always different from one developer to the next. China – the desire by all the developers is go, go, go but red tape is difficult to wade through along with finance friendly bankers as there is caution to avoid a real estate collapse. "The Philippine economy has been robust and steady. However, with this being said we are not seeing a huge demand for golf. We happen to be working with a highly respected residential developer that is making a push into a leisure development and therefore we are seeing golf as one of the amenities being offered." “With more than three decades of experience, Golfplan combines the Art of creative golf course architecture with technically exacting construction working drawings and the modern Science of turfgrass agronomics and maintenance,”
  33. 33. MARCH 2014 Whatabouttheso-calledmoratoriumongolfcourse development?Isthisstilleffectiveorisitbeingconveniently ignoredbyboththebureaucracyanddevelopers? Yes, the moratorium is still in effect for golf real estate development. As for projects still under construction, the effectiveness to move forward depends upon financing. The banks are not ready to fuel the growth at this time. We all can be hopeful that government attitude changes but what is most important is a healthy economy for the developers to sustain the projects once completed. As for the projects still moving forward they are all subject to scrutiny by the central government. Be aware of the local watch dogs. We receive emails weekly from golf construction personnel looking for work due to their China golf site just being shut down. Whatareyourthoughtsaboutthefutureofgolfdevelopmentin Asia–whichgeographicregiondoyoureckonshowspromiseand offersgoodpotentialgoingforward? The most challenging market is India due to the challenges to assemble enough land and water for the projects. Singapore has great possibilities for renovation provided the clubs are prepared to reposition their courses. A few of these courses are really fantastic hidden gems waiting to be rediscovered. Malaysia is in need of course renovation in that the equipment has advanced and the fairway bunker is most often out of position for the average golfer. To many bunkers used as eye candy is a burden on course operations and profitability and takes away from the time to address the turf cultural practices to maintain a quality playing surface. Japan should be a significant renovation market with many of the courses operated using the double green system, old caddy systems, need for new cart path construction for user and maintenance. There are some fantastic golf course locations that would benefit greatly if they could go through a repositioning for increased profitability. Even South Korea is in need of course renovation on nearly half the courses in the country but each developer would say show me the money as it is all about cash flow. What is needed is golf operation audits to value-budget the operations to improve the course quality and repeat play. "Regardless of whether the completed project is a resort, residential golf community, daily fee course or municipal golf course, the firm’s unique design solutions guarantee long-term success and profitability. Remodeling and renovation, upgrading and expansion of existing golf courses receive equal consideration with new golf projects,” TheClubatNineBridges inJeju Korea 36/37
  34. 34. Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club NewsFEBRUARY 2014 FOCUS ON GOLFPLAN special Feature 38/39 Home to a new 7,030 yard golf course, has been unveiled on the west coast of the Philippines. The 18-hole, 7,030-yard course was designed by Golfplan partner Kevin Ramsey. GCA has covered the project, developed by Phillipine real estate company Ayala Land, since plans were announced in February 2011. Ramsey said after the first nine holes had been constructed that the site in Bataan was the best he’d ever worked on and expected the finished eighteen to be a career highlight. Several holes run directly alongside the beach, while others are located in bluffs up to 30 metres above sea level. Golfers will have to negotiate thick jungle on many holes, while others play along ridges 100 metres above sea level. Speaking following the course’s opening, Ramsey said:“With that sort of elevation change, there are only a few holes that don’t have an ocean view, but it’s always a thrill to deploy salt water as a legitimate hazard, and we did that multiple times out here at Anvaya Cove.” “Truly great golf courses can exist in a single environment, but I prefer those that play through a diversity of environments,” added Ramsey. “The terrain here – the elevation change, the vegetation and Ayala Land Premier’s overall land-planning acumen – allowed us to create an uninterrupted string of really strong golf holes that play through five distinct environments, never repeat themselves, and never fail to elicit a strong emotional response.” Ramsey is particularly proud of holes eleven through to thirteen at Anvaya Cove, saying these holes‘form our own Amen Corner, only this one’s at seaside.’Hole eleven is a driveable par-four that look out across the Subic Bay, while hole twelve, also a par-four, plays downhill to the beach. Hole thirteen is located on top of a bluff and features a peninsular green that falls off some 30 metres into the ocean, on three sides. Like the recently opened Laguna Lang Co course in Vietnam, Anvaya Cove uses native manila grass (Zoysia matrella) through the green, in the hope of achieving fast and firm conditions. “From the tips, it’s long and tough enough to challenge tour pros, which is something the client specifically requested – but it’s very playable track from the multiple forward tees we created,”said Ramsey.“At 470 hectares, this is an enormous property. We were given the latitude to provide these golf holes the width they needed. By the same token, the homes here are barely visible from the golf course, which is a welcome anomaly in the golf real estate context.” “With Anvaya Cove, we saw the opportunity to meet the demand in the Philippine domestic market while also competing effectively in the international second-home market,”said Jose Juan Jugo, head of Ayala Land Premier.“We’ve already welcomed retired expats who’ve chosen to make Anvaya Cove their primary homes. With a golf course of this quality now in place, we anticipate further interest in this sort of investment – from what we see as a global market.” Watch Video: The Anvanya Cove Golf & Sports Club
  35. 35. Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News BY Gregg Patterson – General Manager, The Beach club special Feature "We Secret Shoppers are keeping score. Know what we’re looking for. Deliver “The Goods”. Prepare to be judged. Enjoy the Journey."
  36. 36. MARCH 2014 40/41 I’maSecretShopper–notaprofessional mindyou.Notrainingneeded. Butsecret. Unannounced. Like everyone who walks in your front door. You may not think we’re “secret shoppers.” Filling in a scorecard. But we are. And I’m looking, soaking it all in, assigning numbers to experience. In my head. Evaluating. Judging ... You might be asking –“who are you? Who are you, a non-professional, to judge me, The Professional, and my professionally run operation? You don’t know the first thing about hospitality or club management! You’ve never washed dishes, opened doors, slipped on spilled drinks or served coffee. Qualified to judge – you’re not!” And I respond – don’t be naive. Everyone judges. Continuously. You and your club are being judged – rated on a scale of one to ten – by everyone who drives by, parks at, enters into and walks through the club. They’re doing The Audit. Looking. Feeling. Listening. Giving you a score. Telling others. It’s a universal. A constant. Get used to it. It’sJudgmentDay.Everyday.Theseare“MyEyes.”LetmeshowyouhowIsee. [On Arrival – Trepidation] I’mnodifferentthananyoneelse. Whethertenyearsofageorninety. I’vegotthesame needsastheydoinHawaiiorSingapore,ShanghaiorOslo. I’ll arrive “empty” and needy. I’ll ask – will they know my needs? Will they leave me EMPTY? I’m lonely. Who knows me? Who wants to know me? Will they like me if they know me? Will they erase my loneliness? Will they leave me LONELY?
  37. 37. Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News BY Gregg Patterson – General Manager, The Beach club special Feature Do they make me happy? Does the staff smile? Is there laughter in the air? Are they really in this thing called“The Happiness Business???” Score? Do they give me dignity? Do they know if I’m a member or a guest? Do they make me feel special about myself? Do they know my name? To they care why I’m here? Are they interested in who I am and what I do? Score? Do they anticipate my needs? When I walk into the Grill do they greet me, seat me, menu-me, drink-me, water-me, bread-me, food-me and ask if I need MORE of ANYTHING before I ask??? Score? Do they keep it clean? Does the furniture survive“the rub test?” Are the pillows fluffed? Do the windows have streaks? Are there cobwebs in the corners? Do the staff answer questions“cleanly?” Do they have “clean priorities”– people before stuff? Score? Do they “do the details?” Are they professional? Adept at doing the details of what needs doing? Do they know how to take orders, deliver food, remove the empties? Score? Do they have a “presence”? Are the people who are supposed to be doing the stuff that needs doing visible? Are the people I see focused on me or diverted by their smart phone, their computer or their chatter with staffers? Score? Do they “see things” that need doing – then do something about the things that they’ve seen? Are the staff seeing the little details that need attention – the dust on the ventilator, the wobbling fan, the I’m scared. Am I parking in the right place? How should I greet the gardener? Should I register when I arrive? Will they ease my fears? Will they leave me SCARED? I need dignity. I want to feel good about myself. But this is a private club! I didn’t go to Yale or Harvard! I don’t drive a Porsche! Will they make me feel special, like I’m really worth something, when I walk through the clubhouse? Will they give me DIGNITY? I need Status. I want to stand out in the crowd. To be somebody in the midst of many. Will they take note of me, acknowledge me amidst a crowd of people? Will they give me STATUS? I need The Buzz. I want excitement in my life. I want to be lifted above “ground zero.” I need memorable moments. I want to be energized and inspired and amused and amazed and entertained. Will they give me THE BUZZ??? And as I walk the long walk through the parking lot, I’ll be asking – will they fill my Big Empty? Will they take care of my“needs”? We“secretshoppers”havetrepidations.We’rekeepingscore. Andjudging. [While There – Expectations] WhenIwalkthroughtheclubhouse,whenIorderadrink,dineinthe diningroomorbuyaputterintheproshop,I’llhaveaservicescorecard inmybrain. AndI’llbejudging.
  38. 38. MARCH 2014 42/43 "Come Judgment Day, shoppers are primed to judge whatever you’re selling – and the criteria for judging are pretty much the same whether The Shop’s for fast food or clubs, hotels or motels, gas stations or convenience stores." Photo courtesy of David Kirkland
  39. 39. Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club NewsFEBRUARY 2014 BY Gregg Patterson – General Manager, The Beach club special Feature 44/45 PCDDirectorsPaulReeves(left) &PhilRyanpopcorn on the floor, the light bulb that’s dead? Are the staff doing something about the stuff that needs doing? Score? We“secretshoppers”haveexpectations.We’rekeepingscore. Andjudging. [When Gone – Revelation] Thequestionsarealwaysthere,intheforefront,immediate. “WillIcomeback? Wasitworththebucks? Wasitagooduseofmy time? WillIbuyitagain? WillIjoin???”I’llbeasking. Did they know ME? Do they know my name, face, something about me – personally? Did they know what my“market segment”(man, woman, young child, old geeker, etc.) wants? Score??? Did they meet my EXPECTATIONS? Did they know what my expectations were? Did they give me happiness, did they give me dignity, did they anticipate my needs, was the place and the thinking“clean”, did they do the basics that needed doing, were they a“presence”and did they see things and then do something about the things they saw? Score??? Did they make my life EASIER? Did they make golf easier? Tennis-- -easier? Dining – easier? Making reservations – easier? Ordering drinks on the course – easier? Buying stuff in the pro shop – easier? Score??? Did they make my life BETTER? Did they enhance the quality of my “life experience?” Did they make my social experience---better? Did they make my health – better? Did they make my family’s“family experience”– better? Did they make the game of golf – better? Score??? Did they do it DIFFERENTLY than I could get it elsewhere? Is there anything really different about this place that they don’t do equally as good at the hotel resort down the street? Did they really make the staff encounter any different than staff encounters anywhere? Were there any“memorable moments”that I couldn’t find elsewhere for the same money? Score??? WeSecretShopperswillask–amIcomingbackorgoing elsewhere?We’rekeepingscore.It’sJudgmentDay. [Judgement Day] Everyshopperhasatemplateintheirbrainforjudginganexperience. They’refillingintheblanksandscoringtheperformance. Every Shop – like any great journey or any great novel – has a beginning, a middle and an end. People arrive with“trepidations”. They experience with“expectations.” They leave and sum it all up with a“revelation.” Come Judgement Day, shoppers are primed to judge whatever you’re selling – and the criteria for judging are pretty much the same whether The Shop’s for fast food or clubs, hotels or motels, gas stations or convenience stores. We Secret Shoppers are keeping score. Know what we’re looking for. Deliver“The Goods”. Prepare to be judged. And enjoy the journey! Photo courtesy of David Kirkland
  40. 40. 10/11 AUSTRALIA MIZUNO CORPORATION AUSTRALIA PTY LTD Tel: +613-9239-7100 CHINA MIZUNO(CHINA)CORPORATION Tel:+86-21-3222-4688 #317 HONG KONG ICHIKAWA SANGYO CO, LTD Tel:+852-2428-5965 INDONESIA PT MITRAADIPERKASA TBK Tel: +62-21-574-5808 ext. 195 KOREA MIZUNO KOREA LTD Tel:+822-3143-1288 MALAYSIA R.S.H.(MALAYSIA) SDN BHD Tel:+ 603-5123-2668 NEW ZEALAND SPORTS NETWORK LIMITED TEL: +64 9 479 8632 PHILIPPINES MASTER SPORTS CORPORATION T: +632.757.3160 SINGAPORE R.S.H.(SINGAPORE) PTE LTD Tel:+65-6746-6555 TAIWAN MIZUNO TAIWAN CORPORATION Tel:+886-2-2509-5100 THAILAND I.C.C. INTERNATIONAL PUBLIC COMPANY LIMITED Tel: +66-2-293-9000
  41. 41. HEROES OF THE CLUB INDUSTRY CLUB LEADER Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News Stewart, Lee King See Head of Golf, Orchid Country Club Singapore “I started at the club at the bottom of the totem pole and worked my way up the ladder and over the years, I have been fortunate to have been exposed to virtually all operational aspects of managing a club,”
  42. 42. MARCH 2014 For a whole week in February, I sat down and listened to speakers from the club industry extolling the importance of service and the delivery of a“wonderful club experience for members.”These service platitudes kept rolling out on the hour and every hour for a full five days at the 2014 Club Managers Association of America’s World Conference in Orlando, Fl. I returned to Singapore“fattened”with so much information about what quality club service meant that I really was not in a mood to have another minute of discourse on this topic. However, all this was about to change when I bumped into a guy who was the perfect embodiment of what service excellence is all about. He just epitomized everything that I heard service gurus talk about at the CMAA World Conference. This guy was on the ball, sharp and committed to ensuring that his entire team delivered a service experience designed to have members For2014,AsianGolfBusinesshasdecidedtodospecialfeaturesonvariousoccupations within the club industry. It is our hope to seek out the people who are silent heroes and heroines who make the club experience a memorable one for thousands of members of clubs throughout the Asia Pacific region. These exemplary employees are the ones who go that extra mile to make a club special. In this issue, we look at a man who has spent all his life working for a club and he shares his thoughts on delivering the ideal club experience to members. coming back time after time.“That’s what we are paid for – to deliver the best experience that we can muster so that our members are kept happy and that they keep patronizing their club,”declared Stewart Lee King See, Head of Golf at the 27-hole Orchid Country Club in Singapore. Stewart who is now 51 years old, started with the club in 1993, about two years after the club threw open its doors back in 1993.“I started at the club at the bottom of the totem pole and worked my way up the ladder and over the years, I have been fortunate to have been exposed to virtually all operational aspects of managing a club,”he said. According to him, this exposure has provided him with an intimate understanding of what a club should be and what members expect from a club.“Our members pay for the privilege of belonging to Orchid Country Club and by virtue of this investment, I firmly believe that they are entitled to a standard of service that is second to none,”is Stewart’s credo. 48/49 Any Guy In LoudMouth Fashion Has Got To Be A Good Guy!
  43. 43. HEROES OF THE CLUB INDUSTRY Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News CLUB LEADER Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News He is“Stewart”to everyone in his organization, starting with his bag- drop boys, golf registration desk and marshals. He greets everyone with a friendly smile and makes it known to all of them that he is a part of the team. “I am all about building and fostering a strong team spirit …. I believe in engaging with all the staff and the members alike because I believe that members must feel happy when they come to play at the club and likewise, I want the entire staff team to be happy to come to work every day,”he explained.“Everything starts with that first contact and if one strives to make the first contact a friendly experience, everything that follows becomes part of a good experience.” He continued,“My idea of management is not just about getting the job done. The art of managing your team is about getting the right people to do the right job. To do this, one needs to know your subordinates well, understand their strengths and weaknesses and work with them to fully explore their potential.” This guy really gets it about customer service and satisfaction! Just imagine, if every club adopts this simple philosophy of keeping both members and their staff happy, it can only enhance the overall club experience and help the club business grow. Stewart does not really have it all that easy.“Over the years, I have seen all sorts of members – those who are demanding, those who are rude and those who are downright impossible to handle but we must understand that we are dealing with human beings and it takes all sorts to make the world.”So how does he handle the rough and tough ones? “Well, to start with I do not get defensive and neither do I adopt a threatening posture ….. I look upon every obstacle as an opportunity to do something right and win an irate member over. This is my modus operandi – no confrontation is dealt with a counter action of aggression because this is really an exercise in absolute futility!” Now you get the picture why Stewart is a friend to everyone – member and staff alike. Besides, he is also the perfect reflection of friendliness. It is not uncommon to see him attired in clothes that shout out loud that he is all about being happy and friendly. He is the only golfing manager that we’ve met in our rounds who appears dressed in outfits designed by LoudMouth, the in-your-face golf fashion apparel endorsed and worn by golfing legend John Daly. “How I dress reflects my persona and in turn it is also a reflection of the friendly disposition of the club I represent,”is how he sums it up. Well said Stewart – any guy who is up to wearing LoudMouth is a fun loving extrovert and you earn top points for this! Stewart believes in fun – so how does he work to deliver fun at StewartdressesupasSantaClaus atlastyear'sChristmasGolfgame.
  44. 44. MARCH 2014 50/51 his club?“I am glad that you asked – making golf fun and keeping golfers happy is a massive challenge – everything that we do has to be thought through and kept constantly fresh.”With this in mind, Stewart and his team are always at work to explore new ideas to keep members and golfers coming back.“Not all of our ideas work but we have a good batting average and we are very gratified when the majority of our members compliment us on our programmes – it just goes to show that we are being appreciated and this serves as a tremendous source of motivation and inspiration to the team,”Stewart pointed out.“My strategy is to promote golf in a fun yet competitive way for all levels of golfers and our recent Christmas Golf Game was a good example where my team dressed up for the occasion, including the golf stations and buggies and we transformed the entire golf course into a Christmas wonderland for our members and they loved it.” Stewart is tuned in to the needs of the club industry. He is fully cognizant of the need to make golf a fun experience and that clubs need to become more“family-centric”and friendly.“We have to reach out to the family unit and as an all-purpose, full-facility club, we have to keep on working at getting every member of a family involved with Stewartattendedthe2013AsiaPacificGolf SummitheldinJakartaandhewasthe onlydelegatewhochallengedconvention andcomedressedinLoudMouthapparel. Hemadeastatementandaloudoneat thatthattoldallthedelegatesthathe waspartofanexcitingindustry–theclub managementindustry! what we have to offer which is a lot,”Stewart explained. Does he see any particular challenge for the club industry?“Yes one of the biggest challenges for the industry is getting youngsters to work in the golf industry. We need proper Club Management Programmes and schools specializing in golf to train existing and new staff for the industry throughout the region.” Even though he is faced with staff challenges, Stewart takes on a positive outlook –“I have pride in my job, passion for what I do, and proud to be a part of my club.” “A smile says everything and I hope that my staff and I can continue to deliver service with a smile,”was Stewart’s parting words. As he waved good-bye he made one final statement –“my office is in the club house and out on the golf course meeting and staying in constant touch with my members.” Keep it up Stewart! You are a special breed and it’s guys like you who are going to grow the club industry throughout the Asia Pacific. Continue doing it with a smile! DOWNLOAD PDF BOOKLET BY USGA StewartLee(farright) attheAPGS2013
  45. 45. A FIVE-PART Series to help improve your staff, products and profits CLUB MANAGEMENT WITH JAmes Cronk Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News Truestory!AfewyearsagoIreceivedacallfromtheambitiousownerofadestination golf resort, and he needed some serious help. They had been open for three years and they were only at 15% capacity. So I asked them some initial questions; “Did they have a great property?” “Yes” they said, “We have spent 50 million dollars on an award-winning golf course and a 40,000 square foot clubhouse”. I asked, “Did they have good accommodations?” “Of course” they said, “We have built forty cabins around the property that have an amazing view of the ocean”. Impressive I thought, so then I asked, “Can people get to your resort easily?” “Most certainly” they answered, “ a couple years back we bought our own Jet to fly people directly from the mainland to our resort”. Wow I thought, now that is commitment. So finally I said, “Okay then, please send me your business plan and your marketing plan so that I can see what is not working”. PART TWO – PLANNING FOR SUCCESS!
  46. 46. MARCH 2014 Well, based on the long silence on the phone followed by a clearing of the throat, I quickly realized that they didn’t have a business plan, nor had they completed a market study before they started. Quite simply, they didn’t have a plan! They did however have a jet! They found the time and money to buy a jet, but they never took the time to develop a plan. It was only a couple months later that the next call I received was from the bank that now owns the resort after the ambitious owners went into bankruptcy. It is surprising the number of clubs that either don’t have a plan or don’t have an up to date plan. Too often clubs are still using the original concepts that were created before the club got built, when it was simply a dream in the eyes of a billionaire. But today that same club can sometimes be dramatically different in the way that it delivers a golfing experience. Over the years a club can create its own brand, by catering to a certain type of clientele or staff delivering a certain style of service. It may be delivering results but is that because they are delivering on a plan or simply just luck? More importantly, if they are not achieving their goals, how can they create a plan that will change that? So whether we are creating a brand new plan, or updating an old one, there are three important steps for successfully‘planning for success’. The first step is to determine how do we define our success. What is the end goal of our plan? How do we keep score? The second step is to develop the plan itself. What are our key goals and our specific objectives, and what are the required tasks that are needed? Finally, our third and often overlooked step, is how have we communicated our plan to our team? Does everyone know what we are striving for and how each employee can help us get there? 52/53 DEFINING SUCCESSHow do we define our success? Is our goal to create member satisfaction, sell real estate, book more hotel room nights, increase land value or simply to make more money. A different answer will produce a different plan. We all define success is different ways, and it’s critical that as managers, and as a business, that we have clear and measurable terms of success. More importantly, we need to identify what separates our club from our competitor across town. What is unique about our club that makes it special? A well-known course designer? A big clubhouse with a grand ballroom? Many clubs have that, but what is our Unique Selling Proposition and better yet, does every staff member know how to answer that question? If they are in an elevator and someone says, where do you work – do they say at a club that welcomes families? Or at a club that provides the highest level of service in the region? Or at a club that protects the environment? Or do they simply not know what to say… so instead they say“at a club that doesn’t pay me enough”. There is great value that will come from clearly identifying what success means at our own club, and that is because golf is‘un- definable’! That’s right – we work in a business where we are unable to define what we sell and what makes it great. If we stood on the first tee of any golf club in the world, and asked the first ten golfers why they played the game, we would likely get ten different answers. The game is great because it provides so many different benefits, from quality time with customers or family, to self-improvement, to a brisk walk in a beautiful setting. It is different for each of us and that is what "How do we define our success? Is our goal to create member satisfaction, sell real estate, book more hotel room nights, increase land value or simply to make more money. A different answer will produce a different plan. We all define success is different ways, and it’s critical that as managers, and as a business, that we have clear and measurable terms of success."
  47. 47. A FIVE-PART Series to help improve your staff, products and profits Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News CLUB MANAGEMENT WITH JAmes Cronk Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News makes managing the experience so challenging. We need to identify the reasons why our members play at our club and what they enjoy most, and then we need to implement those systems that will create a consistent and memorable experience. Lastly, in regards to defining success, there is a great saying“What can’t be measured can’t be managed”, and when we define what success means to our club we want to make sure that our goals are measurable. If success means member satisfaction, then how do we quantify that? An annual membership satisfaction survey, quarterly focus groups and new membership sales are three ways to ensure that we can define membership satisfaction and also, compare improvements year over year. BUILDING OUR PLANJust like there are hundreds of different golf swings there are many, many different ways that you can go about developing a plan for success. However, no matter how you put the puzzle together, a solid plan should include some of the following basic pieces. First, a Vision Statement, which describes a vision or a mental picture of what the organization wants to achieve in the future. The words are inspirational in nature and easy for all employees to repeat at any given time. Second, a Mission Statement defines our current situation and answers three questions about why our club or organization exists. It tells us‘What we do’,‘Who we do it for’and‘How we do it’. Third, we will benefit from defining our Core Values, which help define behavior that we want our employees to follow. Core Values should be something that all employees can easily recall and should describe best practices for working together. Fourth, our plan needs Strategic Goals, which outline for everyone specific and immediate goals and objectives that if achieved, help us achieve our vision. A strategic goal should be a‘SMART’goal, which is an acronym for‘specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and timely’. Finally, and most importantly, we need an Action Plan that provides a list of daily, weekly and monthly tasks that require completion. If our
  48. 48. MARCH 2014 54/55 InfutureissuesofAsiaPacificGolfMagazinewewillexploreinmoredetaileachofthefourSystems forSuccess(Plan,Prepare,DeliverandMeasure).Inthenextissue,howbesttoPlanforSuccess! Action Plan supports our goals, and if we are successful in completing all of our tasks, then there is a much greater likelihood that we will achieve our mission and ultimately, our company vision. COMMUNICATING OUR PLAN A plan, no matter how concise our extensive, is useless without team buy-in. Many managers are great at developing plans and systems but often fail when it comes to communicating those plans to the team. New employee orientations, regular staff meetings, employee bulletin boards, staff newsletters and departmental log books are all effective tools for ensuring that everyone knows what game you are playing, what the score is at the moment and what it takes to win. IN SUMMARY The business of golf is a complicated one, and although developing a plan is not a guarantee for success, it will provide a road map that everyone can use. If created effectively, and if it’s aligned with your goals and objectives, it should make the road travelled that much smoother and you should reach your desired destination that much quicker. Safe travels! JamesCronkPresentingonSystemofSuccessattheAsiaPacificGolfSummit2013heldinJakartaIndonesia. "A plan, no matter how concise our extensive, is useless without team buy-in. Many managers are great at developing plans and systems but often fail when it comes to communicating those plans to the team. New employee orientations, regular staff meetings, employee bulletin boards, staff newsletters and departmental log books are all effective tools for ensuring that everyone knows what game you are playing, what the score is at the moment and what it takes to win."
  49. 49. COMMUNICATION SKILLS PRUSa'S POINT Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News
  50. 50. MARCH 2014 Not much has changed in the nearly twenty-five years that have transpired since that USGA Green Section survey effort. In an article published recently in Golf Course Industry magazine, Gary Grigg, a respected Past President of the GCSAA and the Vice President of Grigg Bros., wrote that,“A person's greatest asset in this or any other business is his ability to communicate…it's been my experience that most errors on the golf course are caused by improper communication.” Gary went on to add that,“Most superintendents who lose their jobs don't lose them because they lack particular technical skills. instead, they're let go because of a failure to communicate properly2 . In the golf industry today (especially in Asia) I’ve observed that many of those in positions of managing golf courses (predominantly golf course superintendents) are often quite weak in communications skills – and few make an effort to learn to improvement such. Many simply fail to communicate well, fail to detail communications accurately (or at all) or are uneasy communicating appropriate information to golf course owners, CEOs, members and golfing customers. This lack of confidence in communication skills impedes the ability to obtain resources or to convince executive/ownership of real needs and financial requirements. These weaknesses also show up in a failure to effectively communicate to co-workers and to subordinate staff. Owners of golf courses deserve better. While more people in Asia than ever before are well educated in Back in 1990 the USGA Green Section staff conducted a survey to identify and rank those key areas of golf course management that constituted the greatest obstacles in golf course management for successful business operations and careers. Later summarized by an excellent article in the Green Section Record by Robert Brame1 , all of the usual course management areas were considered in the survey including such topics as irrigation, equipment and labor budgets, number of golf rounds, ‘speed- of-greens’ and pest management among others. Not surprising to those who have had decades of observations of golf course operators, the agreed upon,‘Number One Pitfall’ skill area in golf course management that contributed the universally to abject failure was strongly identified as none other than: ‘Communications.’ Turfgrass Science, many lack professional education in Business – particularly in Communications. The ability to be an effective communicator in business is not usually an instinctive talent that one is simply born with, but rather it evolves from studying and practicing the required skills to develop a talent. Such skills and ability involves more than simply telling things to others – it involves wisely listening (or seeing) too. The renown, modern business management guru Dr. Peter Drucker (1909-2005), a former professor at the Clairmont Graduate School of Business in California who developed the Management By Objective (MBO) systems used widely in today’s business organizations stated: “The most important thing in communication is hearing what isn't said.” Lost in Translation In the world of golf business today much meaning in communications can get lost in translation – or, worse, a completely wrong message can be conveyed. In the global golf course business we must be ever mindfully aware that communicating across languages, nations and cultures using interpreters and translators can be as treacherous as walking through a metaphorical minefield! Foreign language 56/57 Improving Your Business Communication Skills
  51. 51. COMMUNICATION SKILLS Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News PRUSa'S POINT Asian Golf Business – Incorporating Club News "In the world of golf business today much meaning in communications can get lost in translation – or, worse, a completely wrong message can be conveyed. In the global golf course business we must be ever mindfully aware that communicating across languages, nations and cultures using interpreters and translators can be as treacherous as walking through a metaphorical minefield! Foreign language translation of various types of communications, inadvertently or by ill intent, often times can create distortion in the message. Above all, complete honesty and respect of confidentiality are critical attributes of a good interpreter."

×