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FOOD SUPPLY
CHAIN:
SAFETY FROM
FARM TO FORK
The Supply Chain & Evolving Food
Patterns
The concept of “farm to fork” encompasses the traceability of food
products as t...
Food Supply Chain Key Players
Farmer Processor Transportation
& Storage
Consumer
Supply Chain Stage 1: Food Origin
The majority of food products and ingredients derive from agriculture.
This type of envi...
Supply Chain Stage 1: Food Origin
Regardless of whether conventional or organic farming methods are
used, the main priorit...
FDA FSMA Produce Safety Rule
The FDA FSMA Produce Safety Rule establishes standards for the safe
production of raw fruits ...
Supply Chain Stage 2: Food Processing
A large portion of the available foodstuffs are produced by a small
percentage of th...
Supply Chain Stage 2: Food Processing
As consumer expectations and demands evolve, food manufacturers are
performing a gro...
Supply Chain Stage 2: Food Processing
To manage food safety and quality throughout these processing
activities, manufactur...
FDA FSMA Preventative Controls Rule
The Preventative Controls Rules account for a large portion of theFDA
Food Safety Mode...
Supply Chain Stage 3: Intermediary
Transport & Storage
Transportation & logistics providers play a more important role tha...
Supply Chain Stage 3: Intermediary
Transport & Storage
This leg of the food supply chain reaches consumers directly and is...
Supply Chain Stage 4: Consumer
Consumption
Throughout the farm-to-fork process farmers, retailers, processors,
3PLs and di...
Conclusion
The shared responsibility of transporting food products from farm to
fork is encouraging supply chain businesse...
Contact Datex Now
www.DatexCorp.com
Take Your Free Tech Assessment
Help ensure your food safety compliance. Evaluate your
...
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Food Safety From Farm to Fork

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The concept of “farm to fork” relates to the traceability of edible products as they move throughout the food supply chain. Key SCM players including food manufacturers, 3PLs, farmers, distribution centers and retailers must now closely monitor and control food handling and preparation practices and procedures. This helps to guarantee the safety of end consumers. The process of tracking food throughout the supply chain is much more complex now than ever before due to how far removed consumers are from food sources. In addition to focusing on safety during growth and processing, supply chain operators must also manage food preservation and transportation networks. The food to fork process now places large focus on contamination prevention and maintaining quality standards. Every stage of the food supply chain is highly regulated by government agencies such as the FDA and their newly implemented Food Safety Modernization Act.

The FDA FSMA includes the Produce Safety Rule which establishes standards for the safe production of raw fruits and vegetables, stage one in the farm to fork process. This provision, and many others like it, regulates the minimum safety standards that must be followed to identify and prevent food contamination sources. This legislation applies to farmers that grow, harvest, pack or store produce in a raw or unprocessed state.

Similar FDA legislation regulates the second stage of the food supply chain, food processing. The FSMA Preventative Controls Rule regulates both US and foreign facilities that process or store foods sold in the United States. Identified businesses must provide written plans that detail their analysis and implementation of food safety preventative measures. Food processing is a critical component of the supply chain because the majority of available food is sourced from a small percentage of the population. Food is preserved and processed to meet consumer demands for freshness, nutrition, convenience and more.

Intermediary transportation providers play a large role in closing the gap between processors and consumers, therefore playing a significant role in managing food quality. It is their responsibility to store and transport food to its final location whether that is retail store locations or direct-to-consumer. FDA FSMA also closely regulates this leg of the supply chain to ensure proper temperature, humidity, atmospheric and handling conditions are met.

Once food products reach consumers or “the fork” it is their responsibility to further ensure their personal safety through the proper storage and preparation of their purchased items. Many foodborne illnesses are derived from improper handling and preparation at the consumer level, making this just as critical to manage as every other level of the supply chain.

To learn more about food safety from farm to fork contact Datex supply chain experts today at marketing@datexcorp.com or 800.933.2839 ext 243.

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Food Safety From Farm to Fork

  1. 1. FOOD SUPPLY CHAIN: SAFETY FROM FARM TO FORK
  2. 2. The Supply Chain & Evolving Food Patterns The concept of “farm to fork” encompasses the traceability of food products as they move throughout the supply chain. Supply chain operators including farmers, processors, 3PLs, distribution centers and retailers are expected to examine and control their internal practices and procedures at each stage to guarantee food safety forconsumers. From farm to fork is a much longer process to control today because consumers are much further removed from their food sources. Many are unaware of the complex food preservation and transportation process required to deliver them fresh, high-quality foods. The increasing complexity of this process is forcing every level of the supply chain to more closely monitor the supply chain than everbefore in an effort to avoid contaminated food reaching unsuspecting consumers.
  3. 3. Food Supply Chain Key Players Farmer Processor Transportation & Storage Consumer
  4. 4. Supply Chain Stage 1: Food Origin The majority of food products and ingredients derive from agriculture. This type of environment is much less controlled and is a potential source for food safety concerns. Many conventional farmers utilize natural and synthetic chemicalsto fight pests and diseases and to promote strong crop yields. Each year more and more consumers search for food sources not grown using these chemicals. This has caused many farmers to consider shifting to organic methods and biological farming where only naturally occurring pest control methods are used. Many consumers feel as if the food products derived from thisfarming method are significantly safer than those produced using chemicals.
  5. 5. Supply Chain Stage 1: Food Origin Regardless of whether conventional or organic farming methods are used, the main priority for farmers is to ensure that their products are produced safely. Farm owners work closely with certified scientists and farm advisory boards to properly implement the use of fertilizers, antibiotics, pesticides and animal husbandry. Once products have been grown safely by farmers, food products can move on to the next level of the food supply chain – processing.
  6. 6. FDA FSMA Produce Safety Rule The FDA FSMA Produce Safety Rule establishes standards for the safe production of raw fruits and vegetables. This FSMA provision applies only to farms that grow, harvest, pack, or hold produce in a raw or unprocessed state. This is the first rule to ever regulate food on farms and sets minimum safety standards focused on the identified sources of contamination such as: – Irrigation & agricultural water – Materials put into soil (i.e. manure) – Worker health and hygiene – Intrusion of animals in growing areas – Equipment, tool and building sanitation
  7. 7. Supply Chain Stage 2: Food Processing A large portion of the available foodstuffs are produced by a small percentage of the population. As sustenance farming practices fade, food sources are further removed from consumers. The function of preserving and processing food are a critical in order to get food products to consumers safely and in ediblecondition. Food is processed in a variety manners to meet consumer demands for: – Freshness – Nutrition – Convenience – Variety – Affordability
  8. 8. Supply Chain Stage 2: Food Processing As consumer expectations and demands evolve, food manufacturers are performing a growing variety of processing activities including: – Harvesting, slaughtering, catching/killing game – Cutting, cleaning, packaging & refrigeration – Secondary processing activities • Heating • Cooling/refrigeration • Drying • Smoking • Fermentation • Additives
  9. 9. Supply Chain Stage 2: Food Processing To manage food safety and quality throughout these processing activities, manufacturers develop and implement industry and company standards such as Good Manufacturing Processes, Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) and Quality Assurance Standards. These standards help to develop safe manufacturing processes while more accurately identifying possible contamination points.
  10. 10. FDA FSMA Preventative Controls Rule The Preventative Controls Rules account for a large portion of theFDA Food Safety Modernization Act. Regulated facilities including both US and foreign operations processing or storing foods sold in the US are required to create written plans documenting their analysis and implementation of preventative measures. Written plans must include: – Analysis of potential contamination sources – Preventative measures for each contamination based on risks – Procedures for monitoring contamination – Corrective actions to take in the event of contamination – Recordkeeping requirements
  11. 11. Supply Chain Stage 3: Intermediary Transport & Storage Transportation & logistics providers play a more important role than ever in the food supply chain by closing the gap between food manufacturers and consumers. Third-party logistics providers, retailers, distribution centers and warehouses are also held responsible for preventing potential food safety hazards such as cross contamination, improper storage containers and inadequate storage and transportation temperatures.
  12. 12. Supply Chain Stage 3: Intermediary Transport & Storage This leg of the food supply chain reaches consumers directly and is the last opportunity to identify and eliminate contaminated inventory. In order to prevent these safety hazards and maintain quality standards, these supply chain storage and transportation operations focus on the monitoring and tracking of proper procedures including: – Temperature – Humidity – Atmosphere – Handling conditions Tracking and monitoring these factors in real-time creates thedetailed audit trail required to remain complaint with food safety regulations such as FSMA.
  13. 13. Supply Chain Stage 4: Consumer Consumption Throughout the farm-to-fork process farmers, retailers, processors, 3PLs and distribution centers play a role in retaining food safety. As the last stage, “the fork”, consumers play their own critical role. Preventing contamination is a shared responsibility in the food supply chain that does not end once the food reaches the endconsumer. Many foodborne illnesses at the consumer level are a direct result of : – Inadequate heating during preparation – Food being left too long at room temperature – Cross contamination between cooked and raw food – Contamination during preparation Following strict handling and preparation standards at the consumer level is just as critical as every other level of the food supply chain.
  14. 14. Conclusion The shared responsibility of transporting food products from farm to fork is encouraging supply chain businesses to build strong, reliable partnerships. These long-lasting partnerships allow supply chain operators to more easily develop the mandated audit trails showing that food safety and quality protocols are met. Powerful supply chain technology such as automated data capture, RFID and warehouse management technology helps to facilitate the development of these relationships and compliance documentation. http://www.eufic.org/article/en/expid/review-farm-to-fork/ https://www.dlapiper.com/en/us/insights/publications/2013/01/food-safety-from-farm-to-fork-fda-publishes-prop /
  15. 15. Contact Datex Now www.DatexCorp.com Take Your Free Tech Assessment Help ensure your food safety compliance. Evaluate your current capabilities and close functional gaps.

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