Regulations and Realities
for Value-Added Products
ACORN Conference & Trade Show
November 20, 2013
Presenters: Mike Beamis...
Outline
	
  
•  Introduction to BioFoodTech
•  Trends in Food Development
•  The Product Development Process
•  The Beamis...
BIO|FOOD|TECH	
  
•  Established	
  1987	
  
•  Technical	
  Support	
  for	
  Industry	
  Clients	
  
–  Food,	
  Bioscie...
Three	
  Divisions	
  
•  Food	
  Technology	
  
•  Bioscience	
  Technology	
  
•  Lab	
  Services	
  
Concept	
  to	
  Pilot	
  to	
  Market	
  
•  Turn	
  concept	
  ideas	
  into	
  prototypes	
  in	
  lab	
  	
  
•  Proce...
AtlanDc	
  Region	
  Technology	
  Centres
	
  
BioFoodTech, Charlottetown, PE (pilot plant and incubation)
Coastal Zones ...
Natural	
  &	
  Organic	
  Trends	
  in	
  Food	
  
Product	
  Development	
  
•  Consumer	
  demand	
  for	
  the	
  foll...
Success	
  story	
  
Honibe	
  Honey	
  Drop™
Product	
  Development	
  From	
  
Kitchen	
  to	
  Store	
  Shelf
	
  
What your client wants:
•  Consumed within 45 min
...
Why would you want to
meet these demands?

13-11-26
The	
  Space	
  Time	
  ConDnuum
	
  

http://aboutfacts.net/Science95.htm
13-11-26
Benefits	
  of	
  processing	
  foods
	
  
•  	
  DistribuDon	
  to	
  new	
  markets	
  (Dme	
  and	
  distance)	
  
•  	
...
http://www.toxel.com/inspiration/2010/01/17/clever-healthy-food-packaging/

13-11-26
www.senior –gardening.com

13-11-26
 

Steps in Developing a 	
  New Food Product
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 

Generate	...
Technical	
  Steps	
  in	
  Commercializing	
  
a	
  New	
  Food	
  Product
	
  
•  Develop	
  bench	
  scale	
  prototype...
Beamish	
  Orchard
	
  
Beamish	
  Orchard	
  -­‐	
  Background
	
  
•  We	
  planted	
  our	
  first	
  200	
  apple	
  trees	
  in	
  	
  
•  Now...
Beamish	
  Orchard	
  –	
  Apple	
  Buier
	
  
•  Prepared	
  several	
  recipes	
  in	
  kitchen	
  
•  Engaged	
  BioFoo...
Regulations and Realities for Value-Added Products with Ed Charter and Mike Beamish
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Regulations and Realities for Value-Added Products with Ed Charter and Mike Beamish

  1. 1. Regulations and Realities for Value-Added Products ACORN Conference & Trade Show November 20, 2013 Presenters: Mike Beamish (Beamish Orchard) and Ed Charter (BioFoodTech) 13-11-26
  2. 2. Outline   •  Introduction to BioFoodTech •  Trends in Food Development •  The Product Development Process •  The Beamish Orchard Experience •  Regulatory Issues •  Back to the Beginning with Product Development •  Some Funding Sources 13-11-26
  3. 3. BIO|FOOD|TECH   •  Established  1987   •  Technical  Support  for  Industry  Clients   –  Food,  Bioscience   •  Subsidiary  of  InnovaDon  PEI   •  ISO  9001:2008-­‐Registered  (since  1997)   •  25  highly  qualified  staff   –  Food  scienDsts/technologists   –  Microbiologists   –  Engineers   –  Five  industrial-­‐strength  PhDs  
  4. 4. Three  Divisions   •  Food  Technology   •  Bioscience  Technology   •  Lab  Services  
  5. 5. Concept  to  Pilot  to  Market   •  Turn  concept  ideas  into  prototypes  in  lab     •  Process  scale-­‐up  -­‐  in  pilot  plant   •  Manufacture  in  pilot  plant  for  market  
  6. 6. AtlanDc  Region  Technology  Centres   BioFoodTech, Charlottetown, PE (pilot plant and incubation) Coastal Zones Research Institute, Shippagan, NB (pilot plant) Marine Institute, St. John’s, NL (pilot plant) Perennia, Truro, NS (pilot plant and incubation) University staff and faculty engaged in technical industry support ... Dalhousie (CIFT), Acadia, U of Moncton, etc... Because there are many things to consider in commercializing a food product, build a solid support team.
  7. 7. Natural  &  Organic  Trends  in  Food   Product  Development   •  Consumer  demand  for  the  following   –  No  arDficial  colours   –  No  arDficial  flavours   –  No  “chemical”  residues     –  No  “chemical”  preservaDves   –  No  scienDfic  sounding  ingredient  names   –  In  other  words  …  A  CLEAN  LABEL   8
  8. 8. Success  story   Honibe  Honey  Drop™
  9. 9. Product  Development  From   Kitchen  to  Store  Shelf   What your client wants: •  Consumed within 45 min •  Available in season   •  Requiring preparation prepared) 13-11-26 consumed within 1 year available 365 days a year ready to eat (or easily
  10. 10. Why would you want to meet these demands? 13-11-26
  11. 11. The  Space  Time  ConDnuum   http://aboutfacts.net/Science95.htm 13-11-26
  12. 12. Benefits  of  processing  foods   •   DistribuDon  to  new  markets  (Dme  and  distance)   •   Consumer  convenience  (eg.  containment,  storage,   measuring)   •   Food  safety,  especially  for  larger  volume  suppliers    -­‐   fresh  milk  vs.  pasteurized   •   Spreading  out  handling  and  processing  beyond   harvest   •  Use  of  good  quality  culls       13-11-26
  13. 13. http://www.toxel.com/inspiration/2010/01/17/clever-healthy-food-packaging/ 13-11-26
  14. 14. www.senior –gardening.com 13-11-26
  15. 15.   Steps in Developing a  New Food Product •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  Generate  an  idea   Develop  a  markeDng  plan   Develop  a  business  plan   Find  a  source  of  financial  support   Select  a  product  development  team   Determine  the  product  specificaDons   Search  the  prior  art  -­‐  determine  if  there  are  any  intellectual  property  (IP)  issues   Plan  the  product  development  process   Cost  the  project   Prepare  a  contract   Develop  product  at  bench  scale   Scale  up  to  pilot  producDon  level   Determine  regulatory  requirements   Determine  packaging  including  ingredient  and  nutriDonal  labeling   Evaluate  shelf-­‐life   Carry  out  focus  group  evaluaDon   File  IP  if  applicable   Do  test  markeDng   Develop  quality  management  program   IdenDfy  appropriate  facility  for  producDon   Plan  and  execute  product  launch   Incorporate  conDnuous  improvement  into  producDon  process  (lean  manufacturing)  
  16. 16. Technical  Steps  in  Commercializing   a  New  Food  Product   •  Develop  bench  scale  prototype  (chicken  and  egg  with   markeDng)   •  Scale  up  process  to  pilot  industrial  level   •  Select  and  test  packaging   •  Develop  HACCP  plan   •  Develop  nutriDonal  label  and  ingredient  list   •  Produce  test  markeDng  samples   •  Evaluate  shelf-­‐life  –  microbiological  and  sensory   •  Send  test  samples  for  distributor/end  user  feedback   13-11-26
  17. 17. Beamish  Orchard  
  18. 18. Beamish  Orchard  -­‐  Background   •  We  planted  our  first  200  apple  trees  in     •  Now  about  500  trees  (3  acres)   •  From  the  beginning,  our  goal  was  to  grow  apples   organically.    One  thing  we  did  right  was  to  plant   mostly  disease-­‐free  varieDes  of  apples.   •  U-­‐pick  only  from  first  crop  unDl  2013   •  ReDred  in  2012:  Desire  to  diversify   –  Apple  Buier   –  DisDllery    
  19. 19. Beamish  Orchard  –  Apple  Buier   •  Prepared  several  recipes  in  kitchen   •  Engaged  BioFoodTech  to  do  ‘small  scale’  up   and  refine  recipe  via  ContribuDon  Agreement   •  IniDated  project  to  conduct  full  size  scale  up:   producDon  batch  

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