Male Same-Sex Intimate Partner Violence, Masculinity, and the Incomprehensibility of Being a Victim<br />Dr Matthew Ball<b...
Introduction<br /><ul><li>Dearth of research – victims rarely seek assistance
Conceptual framework to understand
Importance of discourses on intimate partner violence and masculinity and interaction
Chart way discourses create tensions between…
Performing masculinity
Identifying as gay, and
Positioning oneself as a victim of violence
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Male Same-Sex Intimate Partner Violence, Masculinity, and the Incomprehensibility of Being a Victim

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Dr. Matthew Ball, Associate Lecturer, School of Justice, Queensland University of Technology
Despite the dearth of research on the issue of violence within male same-sex intimate partnerships, a recurring finding is that victims of such violence rarely seek assistance from police or other service providers. This presentation will examine the interaction between social discourses on intimate partner violence and those on masculinities in order to provide a broad conceptual framework for understanding
this phenomenon.
Specifically, it will chart the way that social discourses on intimate partner violence, as well as those relating to masculinity, create tensions between performing masculinity,
identifying as gay, and positioning oneself as a victim of violence. In doing so, it will consider the potential for analyses
of these discourses to help understand and prevent intimate partner violence in these contexts.

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Male Same-Sex Intimate Partner Violence, Masculinity, and the Incomprehensibility of Being a Victim

  1. 1. Male Same-Sex Intimate Partner Violence, Masculinity, and the Incomprehensibility of Being a Victim<br />Dr Matthew Ball<br />Associate Lecturer<br />School of Justice, Queensland University of Technology<br />
  2. 2. Introduction<br /><ul><li>Dearth of research – victims rarely seek assistance
  3. 3. Conceptual framework to understand
  4. 4. Importance of discourses on intimate partner violence and masculinity and interaction
  5. 5. Chart way discourses create tensions between…
  6. 6. Performing masculinity
  7. 7. Identifying as gay, and
  8. 8. Positioning oneself as a victim of violence
  9. 9. Potential to inform action (research, support, prevention)</li></li></ul><li>Masculinity<br />Lacking in research<br />Hegemonic masculinity<br />Heterosexuality<br />Capacity for violence<br />Subordinate and oppositional masculinities<br />Violence as suitable resource in absence of others<br />Correcting subordinate social situation (violent crimes)<br />Oppositional masculinity<br />(Connell 2005; Messerschmidt 1993, 2000; Cruz 2000)<br />
  10. 10. Intimate Partner Violence<br />Binary subject positions<br />(Male) perpetrator – heterosexual, working class masculinity<br />(Female) victim – typically ‘feminine’, vulnerable<br />Police and Government Services, Other Research Forums<br />Family violence, violence does not discriminate, liaison officers<br />(Ball and Hayes, forthcoming)<br />
  11. 11. Violence and patriarchy connected (Dobash and Dobash 1979)<br />Heteronormative<br />Sex, Violence and Crime: Foucault and the ‘Man’ Question (Howe 2009)<br />Fear that recognising men as victims would detract from a focus on women (challenge core claims of feminism)<br />Based on less violence against men<br />Same-sex violence dismissed as ‘bland’<br />Feminist Criminology<br />
  12. 12. Interaction<br /><ul><li>Masculinity
  13. 13. Violence as a resource for performing masculinity
  14. 14. Man as violent actor – invisible as victim
  15. 15. Homosexuality as subordinate masculinity
  16. 16. IPV
  17. 17. Generally male perpetrator, female victim - heteronormative
  18. 18. Feminism
  19. 19. Fixed, heteronormative subject positions, based on patriarchal model
  20. 20. Reinforces gendered attitude to GLBTI relationships
  21. 21. Invisibility and marginalisation of same-sex individuals</li></li></ul><li>Effects<br />Invisibility<br />Support provided, social and criminal justice response<br />Victims<br />Victim and man inconsistent – ‘real man’ expected to protect himself<br />Victim status justified (self-approved) if physical harm, psychological injuries unaddressed (men and emotions)<br />Conditions allow men to tolerate relational violence<br />
  22. 22. Conclusion<br />Social and criminological discourses on IPV and masculinity<br />Cannot account for outside heteronormative/feminist frame<br />Impact on help-seeking behaviour<br />What this means<br />Work through discourses on violence, feminism, masculinity<br />Future research<br />Exclusion from society, discourses<br />Identity – interplay of gender and sexuality<br />

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