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Free TV Australia                Review of OP-27Operation of Wireless Microphones in TV Broadcast Channels                ...
Purpose of OP-27• Provide guidance on permitted frequency range  within broadcasting services band (BSB) spectrum for  the...
Low Interference Potential Device (LIPD)• Radiocommunications (Low Interference Potential  Devices) Class Licence 2000, as...
What has now changed?       • BSB spectrum before restack   VHF Band III         UHF Band IV                              ...
Background of OP-27• Free TV Operational Practice OP-27 Operation of  wireless microphones in the television  broadcasting...
Background of OP-27 (cont.)• First issue (September 1997)    – Illustration of intermodulation free channels for wireless ...
Review of OP-27 for post restack• Retain existing postcode restrictive method• Operation of wireless mic is NOT permitted ...
DTTB minimum median field strength               VHF Band III         UHF (Blocks B & C)         UHF (Blocks D & E)       ...
Review of OP-27 for post restack (cont.)• Wireless mic could reuse frequency in TV broadcast channels that are   designate...
Our concerns …• Separation distances for frequency reuse  – How to determine the demarcation point between     coverage ar...
Other issues …• Sharing with biomedical monitoring  equipment in 520-668 MHz   – span across Blocks B, C, D and lower half...
Where studies could be undertaken• ITU-R Study Group 1 / Working Party 1B   – Short range radiocommunication devices (SRD)...
References• Wireless microphone user requirements:    – Recommendation ITU-R BT.1871 (03/2010) User requirements for      ...
References for Short-range Devices• Recommendation ITU-R SM.1896 (11/2011) Frequency ranges    for global or regional harm...
QUESTIONS & ANSWERS    THANK YOU
Free TV Australia - Review of OP-27
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Free TV Australia - Review of OP-27

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Free TV Australia - Review of OP-27

  1. 1. Free TV Australia Review of OP-27Operation of Wireless Microphones in TV Broadcast Channels 7 December 2012
  2. 2. Purpose of OP-27• Provide guidance on permitted frequency range within broadcasting services band (BSB) spectrum for the operation of professional wireless microphones in major capital cities and some larger regional centres• Provide information on class / apparatus licensing regime for the operation of wireless microphones• Tabulate a list of frequency availability for wireless microphone use that is easy to understand by non- technical audiences (e.g. with reference to postcodes)
  3. 3. Low Interference Potential Device (LIPD)• Radiocommunications (Low Interference Potential Devices) Class Licence 2000, as amended July 2011• class licence for wireless microphone transmission must not exceed – VHF 174-230 MHz: 3 mW maximum EIRP – UHF 520-820 MHz: 100 mW maximum EIRP• transmission exceeds the above maximum EIRP levels may subject to apparatus licence framework
  4. 4. What has now changed? • BSB spectrum before restack VHF Band III UHF Band IV UHF Band V 174 – 230 MHz 526 – 582 MHz 582 – 820 MHz channels 6 – 12 channels 28 – 35 channels 36 – 69 • BSB spectrum after restack (2015 onwards) VHF Band III UHF Bands IV and V Block A Block B Block C Block D Block E 174 – 230 MHz 526 – 568 MHz 568 – 610 MHz 610 – 652 MHz 652 – 694 MHz6 7 8 9 9A 10 11 12 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 wireless microphones / in-ear monitor
  5. 5. Background of OP-27• Free TV Operational Practice OP-27 Operation of wireless microphones in the television broadcasting channels – Issue 1 (superseded) September 1997 – Issue 2 (superseded) June 2007 – Issue 3 (current) December 2008 – Issue 4 (in review) date TBA
  6. 6. Background of OP-27 (cont.)• First issue (September 1997) – Illustration of intermodulation free channels for wireless microphone within one TV broadcast channel• Second issue (June 2007) – ACMA’s class / apparatus licensing regime for wireless mics – EMR compliance regime (ARPANSA standard) – Frequency coordination based on postcode restrictive method• Third issue (December 2008) – Update new DTV channels – Inclusion of digital radio in VHF restriction for wireless mics
  7. 7. Review of OP-27 for post restack• Retain existing postcode restrictive method• Operation of wireless mic is NOT permitted in TV broadcast channels that are designated for digital TV transmission within its coverage area• coverage area is defined as an area that receives the transmitted signal at a minimum median field strength of at least – 50 dBμV/m (for Blocks B and C) – 54 dBμV/m (for Blocks D and E)
  8. 8. DTTB minimum median field strength VHF Band III UHF (Blocks B & C) UHF (Blocks D & E) (174-230 MHz) (526-610 MHz) (610-694 MHz) Rural Suburban Urban Rural Suburban Urban Rural Suburban UrbanMin Med Field 44 57 66 50 63 71 54 67 74Strength(dBμV/m)
  9. 9. Review of OP-27 for post restack (cont.)• Wireless mic could reuse frequency in TV broadcast channels that are designated for digital TV transmission if operating in a distance beyond the notification area of that digital TV transmission based on the specified maximum ERP of the digital TV transmitter Maximum ERP of the DTV transmitter Notification area less than 300 W 50 km at least 300 W but less than 3 kW 90 km at least 3 kW but less than 30 kW 140 km at least 30 kW but less than 300 kW 200 km at least 300 kW 300 km• Frequency reuse for area that is beyond the coverage area but within the notification area is possible, but subject to interference assessment
  10. 10. Our concerns …• Separation distances for frequency reuse – How to determine the demarcation point between coverage area and notification area?• Insufficient frequency for wireless mics due to spectral congestion – Especially in overlap TV licence areas in Brisbane/Gold Coast, and (to a lesser extent) in Sydney/Central Coast – What is the alternative for these areas?
  11. 11. Other issues …• Sharing with biomedical monitoring equipment in 520-668 MHz – span across Blocks B, C, D and lower half of Block E – use extensively in hospitals to monitor the condition of seriously ill patients – biomedical telemetry transmitter allows to operate up to maximum EIRP of 11 mW under current LIPD class licence
  12. 12. Where studies could be undertaken• ITU-R Study Group 1 / Working Party 1B – Short range radiocommunication devices (SRD)• ITU-R Study Group 6 / Working Party 6A – User requirements for wireless mics – Specifications toward establishing harmonisation in design and for global roaming of professional wireless mics for ENG
  13. 13. References• Wireless microphone user requirements: – Recommendation ITU-R BT.1871 (03/2010) User requirements for wireless microphones – Report ITU-R BT.2069-5 (05/2011) Tuning ranges and operational characteristics of terrestrial electronic news gathering (ENG), television outside broadcast (TVOB) and electronic field production (EFP) systems• Wireless microphone and in-ear monitoring unit specifications: – ETSI EN 300 422-1 V1.4.2 (08/2011) Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Wireless microphones in the 25 MHz to 3 GHz frequency range; Part 1: Technical characteristics and methods of measurement• Broadcasting Services (Technical Planning) Guidelines 2007, as amended in October 2009
  14. 14. References for Short-range Devices• Recommendation ITU-R SM.1896 (11/2011) Frequency ranges for global or regional harmonization of short-range devices• Report ITU-R SM.2153-3 (06/2012) Technical and operating parameters and spectrum use for short-range radiocommunication devices• Report ITU-R SM.2154 (09/2009) Short-range radiocommunication devices spectrum occupancy measurement techniques• Report ITU-R SM.2179 (09/2010) Short-range radiocommunication devices measurements• Report ITU-R SM.2210 (06/2011) Impact of emissions from short-range devices on radiocommunication services
  15. 15. QUESTIONS & ANSWERS THANK YOU

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