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Unit 1 intro

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Unit 1 intro

  1. 1. EM2007MM_G2_U01.qxd 12/2/05 3:45 PM Page 3 impos03 207:wg00004:wg00004_g2u01:layouts: Name Date Time HOME LINK 11᭜ Unit 1: Family Letter Introduction to Second Grade Everyday Mathematics Welcome to Second Grade Everyday Mathematics. It is a part of an elementary school mathematics curriculum developed by the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project. Several features of the program are described below to help familiarize you with the structure and expectations of Everyday Mathematics. A problem-solving approach based on everyday situations By making connections between their own knowledge and their experiences both in school and outside of school, children learn basic math skills in meaningful contexts so the mathematics becomes “real.” Frequent practice of basic skills Instead of practice presented in a single, tedious drill format, children practice basic skills in a variety of more engaging ways. Children will complete daily review exercises covering a variety of topics, find patterns on the number grid, work Ϫ1 0 Ϫ3 Ϫ2 with addition and subtraction fact families in different formats, and Ϫ8 Ϫ7 Ϫ6 Ϫ5 Ϫ4 Ϫ9 10 8 9 play games that are specifically designed to develop basic skills. 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 18 19 20 An instructional approach that revisits concepts regularly 15 16 17 12 13 14 11 29 30 To improve the development of basic skills and concepts, children 24 25 26 27 28 21 22 23 regularly revisit previously learned concepts and repeatedly practice 36 37 38 39 40 33 34 35 31 32 skills encountered earlier. The lessons are designed to build on 48 49 50 45 46 47 43 44 concepts and skills throughout the year instead of treating them as 41 42 60 57 58 59 55 56 isolated bits of knowledge. 51 52 53 54 68 69 70 65 66 67 A curriculum that explores mathematical content beyond 62 63 64 61 78 79 80 76 77 basic arithmetic Mathematics standards around the world indicate 71 72 73 74 75 88 89 90 that basic arithmetic skills are only the beginning of the mathematical 85 86 87 82 83 84 81 knowledge children will need as they develop critical-thinking skills. In 97 98 99 100 94 95 96 91 92 93 addition to basic arithmetic, Everyday 109 110 Copyright © Wright Group/McGraw-Hill 106 107 108 103 104 105 Mathematics develops concepts and 101 102 skills in the following topics—number and numeration; operations and computation; data and chance; geometry; measurement and reference frames; and patterns, functions, and algebra. 3
  2. 2. EM2007MM_G2_U01.qxd 12/2/05 3:45 PM Page 4 impos03 207:wg00004:wg00004_g2u01:layouts: HOME LINK Unit 1: Family Letter cont. 11 ᭜ Second Grade Everyday Mathematics emphasizes the following content: Number and Numeration Counting; reading and writing numbers; identifying place value; comparing numbers; working with fractions; using money to develop place value and decimal concepts Operations and Computation Recalling addition and subtraction facts; exploring fact families (related addition and subtraction facts, such as 2 ϩ 5 ϭ 7, 5 ϩ 2 ϭ 7, 7 Ϫ 5 ϭ 2, and 7 Ϫ 2 ϭ 5); adding and subtracting with tens and hundreds; beginning multiplication and division; exchanging money amounts Data and Chance Collecting, organizing, and interpreting data using tables, charts, and graphs Geometry Exploring and naming 2- and 3-dimensional shapes Measurement Using tools to measure length, weight, capacity, and volume; using U.S. customary and metric measurement units, such as feet, centimeters, ounces, and grams Reference Frames Using clocks, calendars, thermometers, and number lines Patterns, Functions, and Algebra Exploring number patterns, rules for number sequences, relations between numbers, and attributes Everyday Mathematics provides you with many opportunities to monitor your child’s progress and to participate in your child’s mathematics experiences. Throughout the year, you will receive Family Letters to keep you informed of the mathematical content that your child will be studying in each unit. Each letter includes a vocabulary list, suggested Do-Anytime Activities for you and your child, and Copyright © Wright Group/McGraw-Hill an answer guide to selected Home Link (homework) activities. You will enjoy seeing your child’s confidence and comprehension soar as he or she connects mathematics to everyday life. We look forward to an exciting year! 4
  3. 3. EM2007MM_G2_U01.qxd 12/2/05 3:45 PM Page 5 impos03 207:wg00004:wg00004_g2u01:layouts: HOME LINK Unit 1: Family Letter cont. 11 ᭜ Unit 1: Numbers and Routines This unit reacquaints children with the daily routines of Everyday Mathematics. Children also review and extend mathematical concepts that were developed in Kindergarten Everyday Mathematics and First Grade Everyday Mathematics. In Unit 1, children will … ᭜ Count in several different intervals—forward by 2s from 300, forward by 10s from 64, backward by 10s from 116, and so on. ᭜ Practice addition facts, such as 5 ϩ 4 ϭ ? and ? ϭ 7 ϩ 5. ᭜ Review whole numbers by answering questions like “Which number comes after 57? After 98? After 234?” and “Which number is 10 more than 34? 67? 89?” ᭜ Respond to prompts like “Write 38. Circle the digit in the 10s place. Put an X on the digit in the 1s place.” ᭜ Work with a number grid to reinforce place-value skills and observe number patterns. Ϫ9 Ϫ8 Ϫ7 Ϫ6 Ϫ5 Ϫ4 Ϫ3 Ϫ2 Ϫ1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Children use number grids to learn about 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 ones and tens digits and to identify number patterns, such as multiples of three. ᭜ Review equivalent number names, such as 10 ϭ 5 ϩ 5, 10 ϭ 7 ϩ 3, 10 ϭ 20 Ϫ 10, and so on. ᭜ Play games, such as Addition Top-It, to strengthen number skills. ᭜ Practice telling time and using a calendar. Copyright © Wright Group/McGraw-Hill Do-Anytime Activities To work with your child on the concepts taught in this unit, try these interesting and rewarding activities: 1. Discuss examples of mathematics in everyday life: television listings, road signs, money, recipe measurements, time, and so on. 2. Discuss rules for working with a partner or in a group. ᭜ Speak quietly. ᭜ Be polite. ᭜ Help each other. ᭜ Share. ᭜ Listen to your partner. HOME INNING VISITOR ᭜ Take turns. ᭜ Praise your partner. ᭜ Talk about problems. 3. Discuss household tools that can be used to measure BALL STRIKE OUT things or help solve mathematical problems. 5
  4. 4. EM2007MM_G2_U01.qxd 12/2/05 3:45 PM Page 6 impos03 207:wg00004:wg00004_g2u01:layouts: HOME LINK Unit 1: Family Letter cont. 11 ᭜ Vocabulary Important terms in Unit 1: math journal A book used by each child; it Math Boxes Math problems in the math journal contains examples, instructions, and problems, as that provide opportunities for reviewing and well as space to record answers and observations. practicing previously introduced skills. tool kits Individual zippered bags or boxes used in the classroom; they contain a variety of items, such as rulers, play money, and number cards, to help children understand mathematical ideas. Math Message A daily activity children complete independently, usually as a lead-in to the day’s lesson. For example: “Count by 10s. Count as high as you can in 1 minute. Write down the number you get to.” Mental Math and Reflexes A daily whole-class oral or written activity, often emphasizing computation done mentally. number grid A table in which numbers are arranged consecutively, usually in rows of ten. A move from one number to the next within a row is a change of 1; a move from one number to the next within a column is a change of 10. Ϫ9 Ϫ8 Ϫ7 Ϫ6 Ϫ5 Ϫ4 Ϫ3 Ϫ2 Ϫ1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Home Links Problems and activities Copyright © Wright Group/McGraw-Hill Exploration A small-group, hands-on activity intended to promote follow-up and designed to introduce or extend a topic. enrichment at home. As You Help Your Child with Homework As your child brings home assignments, you may want to go over the instructions together, clarifying them as necessary. The answers listed below will guide you through this unit’s Home Links. Home Link 1 11 ᭜ Home Link 1 12 ᭜ 1. Ͻ 2. Ͼ 1. °F 2. °F 3. °F 4. °F 3. Ͼ 4. ϭ 40 40 40 40 5. Answers vary. 6. Answers vary. 30 30 30 30 20 20 20 20 10 10 10 10 6

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