Successfully reported this slideshow.
Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Assessing general capabilities

Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Loading in …3
×

Check these out next

1 of 24 Ad

Assessing general capabilities

Download to read offline

This presentation by Julian Fraillon and Juliette Mendelovits from Research Conference 2015 considers assessment of general capabilities and cross-curricular learning outcomes such as literacy in information and communication technologies, creative thinking and collaborative and individual problem-solving. As the expectation for such competencies to be taught in schools has increased, so has the need for teachers and schools to validly and reliably assess student learning in those areas, and to report on them in ways that inform future teaching and learning. This presentation will examine the challenges of assessing and reporting on student learning and learning growth in general capabilities and cross-curricular learning areas. The presentation will explore approaches used in research to address some of these challenges and reflect on how these can be applied in the classroom.

This presentation by Julian Fraillon and Juliette Mendelovits from Research Conference 2015 considers assessment of general capabilities and cross-curricular learning outcomes such as literacy in information and communication technologies, creative thinking and collaborative and individual problem-solving. As the expectation for such competencies to be taught in schools has increased, so has the need for teachers and schools to validly and reliably assess student learning in those areas, and to report on them in ways that inform future teaching and learning. This presentation will examine the challenges of assessing and reporting on student learning and learning growth in general capabilities and cross-curricular learning areas. The presentation will explore approaches used in research to address some of these challenges and reflect on how these can be applied in the classroom.

Advertisement
Advertisement

More Related Content

Slideshows for you (20)

Advertisement

More from Australian Council for Educational Research (12)

Advertisement

Recently uploaded (20)

Assessing general capabilities

  1. 1. Assessing General Capabilities ACER Research Conference Learning assessments: Designing the future 16-18 August, Crown, Southbank, Melbourne Julian Fraillon Director, Assessment and Reporting Research Program – Mathematics and Science
  2. 2. Contents • What are general capabilities? • Challenges in assessing general capabilities • Examples of working with/assessing general capabilities – Visible thinking – ICT literacy • What do ICTL outcomes look like? • Summary • Questions/comments
  3. 3. Successful learners who are able to plan activities independently, collaborate, work in teams and communicate ideas, Confident and creative individuals who have a sense of optimism about their lives and the future Active and informed citizens who act with moral and ethical integrity Melbourne Declaration, 2008 What are general capabilities? 1. What are GCs 2.Challenges 3. Examples (making explicit) 4. Outcomes 5. Summary
  4. 4. What are general capabilities? • They encompass knowledge, skills, behaviours and dispositions that, together with curriculum content in each learning area and the cross- curriculum priorities, will assist students to live and work successfully in the twenty-first century (ACARA, 2015) 1. What are GCs 2.Challenges 3. Examples (making explicit) 4. Outcomes 5. Summary
  5. 5. What are general capabilities? The Australian Curriculum includes seven general capabilities. These are: • Literacy • Numeracy • Information and communication technology capability • Critical and creative thinking • Personal and social capability • Ethical understanding • Intercultural understanding. 1. What are GCs 2.Challenges 3. Examples (making explicit) 4. Outcomes 5. Summary
  6. 6. What are general capabilities? The Australian Core Skills for Work framework comprises 10 skills organised across three clusters: CLUSTER 1 - NAVIGATE THE WORLD OF WORK a. Manage career and work life b. Work with roles, rights and protocols. CLUSTER 2 - INTERACT WITH OTHERS a. Communicate for work b. Connect and work with others c. Recognise and utilise diverse perspectives. CLUSTER 3 - GET THE WORK DONE a. Plan and organise b. Make decisions c. Identify and solve problems d. Create and innovate e. Work in a digital world. 1. What are GCs 2.Challenges 3. Examples (making explicit) 4. Outcomes 5. Summary
  7. 7. Challenges in assessing general capabilities 1. Teacher lack of familiarity/confidence in dealing with the area 2. Lack of available resources to support assessment 3. Student familiarity with the discipline 4. Time/crowded curriculum 5. Influence of context on expressions of performance 1. What are GCs 2.Challenges 3. Examples (making explicit) 4. Outcomes 5. Summary
  8. 8. Examples of working with some general capabilities – visible thinking 1. Working with staff on deciding what ‘thinking’ looks like across different disciplines 2. Staff observed ‘visible thinking’ across different classes Staff observed that the classes were not set up in ways to allow students to demonstrate ‘thinking’ Furthermore – there were important differences between teachers’ and students’ impressions of what was happening in classes. 1. What are GCs 2.Challenges 3. Examples (making explicit) 4. Outcomes 5. Summary
  9. 9. Examples of working with some general capabilities – visible thinking What was missing? Learnt Curriculum Intended curriculum Assessed curriculumEnacted curriculum 1. What are GCs 2.Challenges 3. Examples (making explicit) 4. Outcomes 5. Summary
  10. 10. Making the discipline explicit – the teachers’ perspective (planning) 1. Consider general capabilities in the context of each subject 2. Plan to embed teaching and learning of general capabilities in subject teaching 3. Make the connections explicit to students 1. What are GCs 2.Challenges 3. Examples (making explicit) 4. Outcomes 5. Summary
  11. 11. Making the discipline explicit – the teachers’ perspective (planning) An example from ICT Literacy 1. What are GCs 2.Challenges 3. Examples (making explicit) 4. Outcomes 5. Summary
  12. 12. Making the discipline explicit – the teachers’ perspective (planning) An example from ICT Literacy Applying social and ethical protocols and practices when using ICT • recognise intellectual property • apply digital information security practices • apply personal security protocols • identify the impacts of ICT in society. 1. What are GCs 2.Challenges 3. Examples (making explicit) 4. Outcomes 5. Summary
  13. 13. Making the discipline explicit – the teachers’ perspective (planning) An example from ICT Literacy Investigating with ICT • define and plan information searches • locate, generate and access data and information • select and evaluate data and information. 1. What are GCs 2.Challenges 3. Examples (making explicit) 4. Outcomes 5. Summary
  14. 14. Making the discipline explicit – the students’ perspective (implementing) An example from ICT Literacy • Don’t assume that by having students complete work on a digital device that it will improve their ICT literacy. • Sophia once showed me a spectacular presentation she had spent two hours making using the 20 French words she was required to learn for homework. What does this tell me about her ICT Literacy? 1. What are GCs 2.Challenges 3. Examples (making explicit) 4. Outcomes 5. Summary
  15. 15. Making the discipline explicit – the students’ perspective (implementing) An example from ICT Literacy When having students complete work on a digital device, plan for and give them feedback on their use of ICT (as relevant to the task) in ways that may include: – How efficiently relevant digital information was sought and located; – How effectively students’ evaluated the relevance and credibility of digital information; – What students did to validate the accuracy of digital information; – How effectively students used software to construct digital work products (e.g. presentations, documents, images and diagrams); and – How well students demonstrated consideration of audience and purpose in constructing a digital work product. 1. What are GCs 2.Challenges 3. Examples (making explicit) 4. Outcomes 5. Summary
  16. 16. Making the discipline explicit – the students’ perspective (implementing) An example from ICILS – a task 1. What are GCs 2.Challenges 3. Examples (making explicit) 4. Outcomes 5. Summary
  17. 17. Making the discipline explicit – the students’ perspective (implementing)
  18. 18. Making the discipline explicit – the students’ perspective (implementing)
  19. 19. Making the discipline explicit – the students’ perspective (implementing) An example from ICILS – scoring foci Element Focus Characteristic Title Role Position and formatting Images Layout Alignment and size Text Information design Formatting and layout to show role Text Contrast Contrast between text and background Colour Consistency Use of colour to show role Images Selection Relevance of images to text Text Adaptation Copy/paste versus rephrase Text Purpose Selected information meets purpose Poster Persuasiveness Attempt to persuade viewers to participate Poster Use of page Full page used or not 1. What are GCs 2.Challenges 3. Examples (making explicit) 4. Outcomes 5. Summary
  20. 20. What do ICTL outcomes look like? Fifty per cent of Australian Year 6 students (based on 2011 data) and 76 per cent of Australian Year 8 students (based on 2013 data) can at least:1 • complete basic and explicit information- gathering and management tasks • locate explicit information from within given electronic sources • make basic edits, and add content to existing information products in response to specific instruction • create simple information products that show consistency of design and adherence to layout conventions • demonstrate awareness of mechanisms for protecting personal information and some consequences of public access to personal information. (ICILS Level 2) 1. What are GCs 2.Challenges 3. Examples (making explicit) 4. Outcomes 5. Summary 1 From Gebhardt, E & Fraillon, J Equating the national Australian and international computer and information literacy tests and examining growth from Year 6 to Year 8 and Year 10. Presented to the IEA International Research Conference , Cape Town South Africa, June, 2015.
  21. 21. What do ICTL outcomes look like? Fifty-six percent of Australian Year 10 (based on 2011 data) students can at least: • demonstrate the capacity to work independently when using computers as information-gathering and management tools • select the most appropriate information source to meet a specified purpose • retrieve information from given electronic sources to answer concrete questions • follow instructions to use conventionally recognized software commands to edit, add content to, and reformat information products • recognize that the credibility of web-based information can be influenced by the identity, expertise, and motives of the creators of the information. (ICILS Level 3) 1. What are GCs 2.Challenges 3. Examples (making explicit) 4. Outcomes 5. Summary 1 From Gebhardt, E & Fraillon, J Equating the national Australian and international computer and information literacy tests and examining growth from Year 6 to Year 8 and Year 10. Presented to the IEA International Research Conference , Cape Town South Africa, June, 2015.
  22. 22. In summary For each of the general capabilities (by any definition): • Literacy • Numeracy • Information and communication technology capability • Critical and creative thinking • Personal and social capability • Ethical understanding • Intercultural understanding. Make the discipline explicit • Plan activities/tasks that allow for the expression of the capability • Include references to it in teaching (don’t assume it will be imbued) • Include relevant criteria in assessment • Provide feedback to students • Monitor progress and plan further activities/learning programs accordingly 1. What are GCs 2.Challenges 3. Examples (making explicit) 4. Outcomes 5. Summary
  23. 23. Questions/comments

×