Walk through War - World War I

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A history lesson for World War I battles (Webquest)

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Walk through War - World War I

  1. 1. Walking through War – World War I Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for 10th Grade (World History) Designed by Alex Crane [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page
  2. 2. Introduction Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] War has broken out! The assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on 28 June 1914 put into motion machines of war that could not be stopped. Austria-Hungary made impossible demands upon Serbia which were expectedly refused. Germany backed anything Austria-Hungary did in its own ambitions and they both declared war on Serbia. In response, due to an system of alliances already in place, Great Britain, Russia, and France all eventually declared war on Germany and Austria-Hungary. Germany, in hopes of a quick knockout blow to France employed its Schlieffen Plan . It invaded Belgium to position itself on France’s flank and invaded France from there. Unfortunately for the Germans, it failed as they had not moved as quickly as had been hoped. Neither side on either front could find advantage. The result was a stalemate. The respective armies dug thousands of miles of trenches and would fought over very little land. Outdated tactics comprised mainly of mass charges were used, but the new technologies of the day, including machine guns and tanks , created devastating outcomes. This war would prove to be the most destructive to date. (These sites are to help provide some context for you. Use at your own discretion)
  3. 3. The Task Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] As a British journalist, you’ve been asked to go to the front lines to report back to the people about what is happening. You are to go to the following sites and provide an account on what happened during these battles. Your task is to gather data from these battles, including relative location, statistics (relative military strength and size, casualties, dates, etc.), outcome (who won), significance (why it is important), and tactics used. After this data is gathered, analyze it and write articles (at least two pages long each) on four battles. Remember, articles don’t just relay data, but usually have an underlying meaning as well. These are not editorials, so do not insert your own opinions. Try to find significance in the battles. For instance, if all you can see is that thousands of lives were lost over a mile of ground and did little to end the war, you can say that, but again, be careful of editorializing. (Finding pictures would go a long ways to help in your articles, but they may not be used in place of text) Title
  4. 4. The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] <ul><li>Being a combat journalist is no easy job. Therefore you will be teamed up with one other colleague. Here are some suggestions on where to start. </li></ul><ul><li>Go these sites and study the battles. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Battle of the Frontiers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>First Battle of the Marne </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>First Battle of the Aisne </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Battle of Verdun </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Battle of the Somme </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Battle of the Messines </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Gather all your data together (this will be turned in as well, so research all of the battles) </li></ul><ul><li>Decide which battles are worth reporting on. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Try to determine what effect your article will have on morale (improve, damage, or no change?) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is the battle significant in that it had an effect on the war effort? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In wartime, journalists need to remember that information they include in their articles can affect many different aspects of the domestic front, so be aware of what you include. </li></ul><ul><li>Write the articles (you may write two articles each or write all four together – hint : having two names on an article helps provide a sense of credibility) </li></ul><ul><li>Submit the articles for review (turn them in). </li></ul><ul><li>You will receive them back with suggested changes. </li></ul><ul><li>Finalize articles and turn them in for publication. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Evaluation Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Beginning 1 Developing 2 Accomplished 3 Exemplary 4 Score Organization of data gathered Notes taken on event have little to no organization Organization of notes attempted, but needs more work Clear evidence of organization in notes taken, but some areas unclear Organization very apparent, used well and clear Quality of data gathered Data gathered is not relevant to assignment Data gathered has some relevance, but does not have clear purpose Data gathered is relevant to assignment, but lacks some significance Data gathered is relevant and significant to assignment Accuracy of data gathered There are mistakes throughout the gathered data, little or no effort apparent Mistakes in data are common, but there is some effort shown There are few mistakes in data There are no mistakes in data, effort very clear Quality of article Article poorly written; journalistic sense not apparent Article written unsatisfactorily, but journalistic sense is developing Article well-written with a good grasp of journalism Article very well-written, journalistic sense readily apparent and understood Cooperative work Team worked very poorly together, split all the work 50-50 as to not work together Team tried to work together, but pairing was not compatible, little effort to overcome obstacles Team worked well together, but still had some issues with final product Team worked very well together, no problems
  6. 6. Conclusion Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Well done! You’ve completed your task. Coming out of a war zone unscathed is an accomplishment in itself. Rest easy knowing that you have helped the country and the world understand the war better. Maybe you yourself understand it a little better too?
  7. 7. Credits & References Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Main source is www.firstworldwar.com Format provided by The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group
  8. 8. Walking through War – World War I [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for 10th Grade (World History) Designed by Alex Crane [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Conclusion
  9. 9. Introduction [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson was designed to help students better understand the nature of a World War I battlefield. The students will be working as combat journalists, researching the battles, and writing articles about them. They will be asked to keep in mind various issues of war such as morale and censorship while writing. They will be placed with partners so they can learn how to research and write collaboratively. During this exercise the students will be using the internet as their primary tool to gather information. Some sites have been provided, but additional research is recommended. The sites given contain a substantial amount of information in text, pictures, maps, and timelines. This exercise is based on several battles during World War I. Its focus is on the significance of these battles, not just the numbers. Students are asked to find out why these battles are important and what their outcomes did to affect the war overall. Evaluation Conclusion
  10. 10. Learners (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson is designed for the ninth or tenth grades for U.S. History, World History, or European History. It can include aspects of English as there are many primary sources that can be used in conjunction with the internet sites. The concept of the lesson can be extended throughout junior high and high school, but the amount of guidance will need to be altered to suit the abilities of the students. The students should be introduced to World War I, journalistic techniques and writing styles, and investigative research skills. These are essential as many students will not have been introduced to these areas. Evaluation Conclusion
  11. 11. Curriculum Standards (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Social Studies Standards Addressed 1.3 Historical relationships - Use chronology to examine and explain historical relationships 2.1 Formulation of questions and analysis of data - Formulate questions regarding the past, and obtain and analyze historical data 2.2 Source interpretation - Interpret and evaluate primary and secondary sources of historical information 4.1 Impact of science and technology - Understand the impact of scientific and technological developments on individuals and society 4.2 Economic factors - Understand how economic factors have influenced historical events 5.1 Government systems - Know how various systems of government have developed and functioned 5.3 Political power - Know how political power has influence history 5.4 Political relations - Know the history of relationships among different political powers and the development of international relations Evaluation Conclusion
  12. 12. The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Conclusion <ul><li>Being a combat journalist is no easy job. Therefore you will be teamed up with one other colleague (Teachers will decide pairings). Here are some suggestions on where to start. </li></ul><ul><li>Go these sites and study the battles. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Battle of the Frontiers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>First Battle of the Marne </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>First Battle of the Aisne </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Battle of Verdun </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Battle of the Somme </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Battle of the Messines </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Gather all your data together (this will be turned in as well, so research all of the battles) </li></ul><ul><li>Decide which battles are worth reporting on. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Try to determine what effect your article will have on morale (improve, damage, or no change?) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is the battle significant in that it had an effect on the war effort? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In wartime, journalists need to remember that information they include in their articles can affect many different aspects of the domestic front, so be aware of what you include. </li></ul><ul><li>Write the articles (you may write two articles each or write all four together – hint : having two names on an article helps provide a sense of credibility) </li></ul><ul><li>Submit the articles for review (turn them in). </li></ul><ul><li>You will receive them back with suggested changes. </li></ul><ul><li>Finalize articles and turn them in for publication. </li></ul><ul><li>This lesson is designed to be mostly done outside of class. There will be time offered during class to work on it, but much of it will have to be done on the students’ time. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Resources (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson requires some time in a computer lab in order to introduce the assignment. The students will have this time and more set aside later to work on the project. The lesson also uses www.firstworldwar.com extensively to guide the students on their research. Evaluation Conclusion
  14. 14. Evaluation (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Conclusion Beginning 1 Developing 2 Accomplished 3 Exemplary 4 Score Organization of data gathered Notes taken on event have little to no organization Organization of notes attempted, but needs more work Clear evidence of organization in notes taken, but some areas unclear Organization very apparent, used well and clear Quality of data gathered Data gathered is not relevant to assignment Data gathered has some relevance, but does not have clear purpose Data gathered is relevant to assignment, but lacks some significance Data gathered is relevant and significant to assignment Accuracy of data gathered There are mistakes throughout the gathered data, little or no effort apparent Mistakes in data are common, but there is some effort shown There are few mistakes in data There are no mistakes in data, effort very clear Quality of article Article poorly written; journalistic sense not apparent Article written unsatisfactorily, but journalistic sense is developing Article well-written with a good grasp of journalism Article very well-written, journalistic sense readily apparent and understood Cooperative work Team worked very poorly together, split all the work 50-50 as to not work together Team tried to work together, but pairing was not compatible, little effort to overcome obstacles Team worked well together, but still had some issues with final product Team worked very well together, no problems
  15. 15. Conclusion (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson will be useful because it gives students an insight into what fighting in World War I was like. Being able to research the battles will show how battle tactics had not caught up to the development of technology, one of the major factors of the war. It will also help them see the significance of international politics, in particular that of alliances. Overall, it will give students more time than is typically given to study and research World War I, thereby increasing their understanding of the war. Evaluation Conclusion
  16. 16. Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Main source is www.firstworldwar.com Format provided by The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group Evaluation Conclusion

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