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Transportation Technology Vision 2019

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Transportation organizations must reinvent their rail and transit companies to capture these 4 opportunities that will characterize the post-digital future. Read more.

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Transportation Technology Vision 2019

  1. 1. TRANSITIN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGY VISION 2019
  2. 2. 2 Charlotte, like many, dreams of having an assistant to handle trip-planning details. Someone who knows us, our travel needs and our schedules as well as we do. Someone we can count on to get us from point A to point B with minimal hassle and maximum convenience. That dream is about to become our reality. With emerging technologies, Intelligent Journey Planning will be in everyone’s reach. In fact, in the fast-approaching post-digital era, automated end-to-end trip-planning will be just one component of a re-imagined transportation experience. Charlotte is set for her sales pitch. She only needs to figure out the best way to get to her client’s office in the city by 8 a.m. She makes her plan the night before. It’s no easy task. By the time Charlotte has checked weather, traffic and public transport sites, determined the best mode of travel, chosen the route and schedule, and booked each leg of her journey, an hour has passed. That’s one less hour of sleep before the biggest presentation of her career. TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE
  3. 3. 3 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE Trip-planning can be tedious. Just ask Charlotte. Her effort to get to a meeting on time is characterized by multiple steps. And multiple frustrations. For Charlotte, driving is an option. A local traffic site shows that road construction might double her commute time. She can’t risk being late, so she looks at public transportation schedules instead. The connections along the bus route aren’t ideal. The train is a better choice. She can take the 7 a.m. train from a nearby suburb and be downtown at 7:45. But parking at the suburban station can be problematic. Since ride-share services aren’t yet widely available in her exurb, she orders a car to get there on time. While she’s at it, she books a ride from the downtown station to the client’s office. It’s only a half-mile away, but the forecast calls for rain and heavy wind. Hailing a cab or ordering an Uber or Lyft on days like that—especially during the morning rush—can be tricky. If only trip planning was easier. For Charlotte and the rest of us, it soon will be. ALLA-BORED
  4. 4. 4 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE THEFUTUREISCLOSER THANYOUTHINK Seventy-eight percent of transportation executives agree that social media, mobile, analytics and cloud computing (SMAC) are core components of their organizations’ technical foundations. This and other findings from Accenture’s 2019 Technology Vision1 suggest the industry is entering a post-digital era. It’s an era in which more transportation organizations have an understanding of the digital transformations ahead of them than do not. A time in which digital capabilities that once set companies apart are now table stakes. What distinguishes winners today is not their technologies, but how they use their technologies to meet the needs and expectations of customers, employees and business partners. In this regard, SMAC still play a critical role. But new technologies—artificial intelligence (AI), blockchain and augmented reality, to name a few—are gaining ground. Fast. “Future-minded leaders know they will need not only every digital tool in their current arsenal to succeed, they’ll also need new ones. The next set of technologies every company will need to master? Distributed Ledger Technology, Artificial Intelligence, Extended Reality and Quantum Computing.” Accenture Technology Vision 2019 Trend: DARQ Power
  5. 5. of transportation executives agree that integrating customized services and real-time delivery will usher in the next wave of competitive advantage. of transportation executives are experimenting with distributed ledgers, AI or extended reality solutions. believe the combination of these technologies will lead to extensive or transformational change in their organizations over the next three years. 85% 94% 68% 5 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE
  6. 6. 6 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE Some pioneers are already infusing new technologies into their core operations. Hong Kong’s subway, one of the world’s most efficient public transportation systems, is maintained by AI—or more specifically, an algorithm that automatically assigns 10,000 workers to more than 2,500 engineering tasks each week. The solution allows MTR Corporation, the subway’s owner, to reduce the time spent on scheduling work and repairs. That translates into cost savings of $800,000 per year.2 Swiss Federal Railways (SBB) is another transit organization leading the post-digital charge. SBB recently completed a proof of concept designed to improve workplace safety. The solution, based on a blockchain-based credentials management system, ensures workers at the company’s construction sites have received proper training.3 MTR and SBB are two companies showing what is possible in the post-digital frontier. Others will join their ranks as AI, extended reality, distributed ledgers and even quantum computing mature. When these technologies are applied in innovative and combinatorial ways, we will see a fundamental shift—not only in how transportation services are managed and secured, but also in how travelers experience and navigate the world. Four opportunities hold particular potential.
  7. 7. 7 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE OPPORTUNITY1 FIRST-TO- LAST-MILE SERVICE “As people’s lives become more and more personalized through technology, creating a world with a multiverse of realities and moments, companies must reinvent their organizations to capture those opportunities as they come. That means viewing each moment as if it is an individual market—a momentary market. Miss the moment, and there is no second chance.” Accenture Technology Vision 2019 Trend: MyMarkets
  8. 8. 8 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE Transportation organizations have long recognized the potential value in meeting customer demand for Mobility-as-a- Service (MAAS) solutions. New players are already staking their claim. Whim, the world’s first all-in-one mobility app, offers monthly transportation subscriptions and pay-as-you-go options for multimodal transit in several US and European cities.4 Transit apps Citymapper in London and WienMobil in Vienna use open data, mobile and payment technology to enable users to select public transit, bike-share, rideshare, scooter and even ferries for their end-to-end journeys.5, 6 Some transit authorities are taking steps to flesh out MAAS solutions, as well. For example, the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) is delivering first- and last-mile services and infrastructures for passengers traveling to or from select bus and rail stations. Solutions include bike lanes, shared bike or car services, and facilities for making modal connections.7 Recently, Metro teamed with Via—a developer of on-demand transit solutions—to pilot a ridesharing program that services three Metro stations. Via’s algorithm dynamically routes vehicles to and from the stations based on passenger location. Customers originating from or departing to locations in close proximity to one another access the Via app and are directed to a nearby pickup location. Multiple riders then share a single vehicle to their destinations.8 Industry players are eager to deliver highly customized services at the moment of their customers’ choosing. Our research shows that 85 percent of transit leaders agree that the integration of customized services and real-time delivery will be the next big wave of competitive advantage. New technologies are poised to help them achieve that dual objective. AI opens up opportunities in multiple areas—from route optimization to congestion mitigation to pedestrian prediction. Extended reality solutions can help trip planners visualize alternate routes and passengers find their way through virtual stations prior to their arrival. Autonomous vehicles, built on Internet of Things (IoT) sensors, AI and augmented reality solutions, can provide economical and convenient transportation services for passengers looking to travel to and from transit hubs. Just imagine what an integrated, multi-modal solution would mean for commuters like Charlotte.
  9. 9. 9 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE Siri knows Charlotte’s schedule and automatically checks traffic conditions on the morning of her meeting. Delays are likely, so Siri connects to an AI-based integrated route planner. Knowing Charlotte’s preferences, the tool books her optimized travel —all behind the scenes. Siri lets Charlotte know that an autonomous vehicle will pick her up at 7 am. It arrives on time, knowing exactly where Charlotte needs to go. When Charlotte arrives at the station, biometric tools recognize her. A kiosk welcomes her, letting her know that her train leaves in 10 minutes. She is then alerted that her train is ready for boarding on platform 5. As she walks to the platform, she books her seat on the transit app. Charlotte arrives at the downtown station, where an interactive screen welcomes her by name. She is offered 3 options of mobility to get to her final destination—with cost and time required for each. She chooses a dock bike and then accesses her transit app, which guides her to its location and allows her to unlock it. Once Charlotte has locked her bike in the docking station outside of her client’s office, her payment is processed. The app wishes her good luck at her sales pitch. An hour later, the integrated transit tool offers to coordinate Charlotte’s route back home or to her next destination. Pre-trip planning First-mile transport (to the station) Mid-mile transport (station to station) Last-mile transport (from the station) Post-trip experiences 6am 7am 7:10am 7:45am 7:55am 9am Charlotte’s enhanced first-to-last-mile transit experience
  10. 10. 10 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE The benefits of MAAS solutions for individual passengers are clear. The benefits to society are no less noteworthy. Efficient MAAS solutions have the potential to improve traffic management, facilitate regional economic growth, boost livability and social equality—particularly in urban areas where these issues are front and center. Of course, having more people use transit systems is also beneficial for the environment. MAAS solutions—especially those powered by electricity—are, therefore, important components of a community’s strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. France-based transit operator SNCF has committed to achieving carbon- neutrality and reducing CO2 emissions by 25 percent by 2025.9 As important contributors to holistic travel experiences, transportation companies have the opportunity to help local governments shape regulatory frameworks that meet local sustainability objectives and also encourage the development of new business opportunities based on MAAS platforms. Implemented correctly, with the right governance models, MAAS can be a win-win- win-win for transit companies, passengers, communities and the environment. MAASFORONE. MAASFORALL.
  11. 11. 11 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE OPPORTUNITY2 SEAMLESS CONVENIENCE The sets of technologies people choose to use are now so integrated into their lives that they have become a part of consumers’ identities, and leaders are using those identities to create a new generation of offerings.” Accenture Technology Vision 2019 Trend: Get To Know Me “
  12. 12. 12 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE Getting Charlotte to her client meeting on time is critical—and increasingly imaginable thanks to new technologies. But transportation companies can’t ignore an equally lucrative opportunity: the delivery of complementary services and highly relevant and satisfying experiences during the journey. When customers use public transportation, they are more than just passengers. They are unique markets of one— individuals looking to enhance their travel experience. With advances in technology, transportation companies can make traveling more convenient and less disruptive. In China, Shenzhen Metro’s Futian Station leverages the ubiquity of the WeChat app in China to enable passengers to view and pay for digital tickets. WeChat, which started as a basic messaging app, enables all sorts of communications, shopping and gaming experiences, trip planning services, financial transactions and more.10 With its blockchain-based invoicing system, which acts as a distributed accounting database, Shenzhen Metro’s Futian Station is using an app that is already integrated into hundreds of millions of people’s daily lives to offer highly convenient, cashless travel.11 Deutsche Bahn AG launched an AI-based chatbot to fast-track text responses to customer queries. The virtual assistant easily and quickly manages questions related to ticketing and schedules, thereby freeing human agents to focus on more complex requests.12 of transportation executives believe that digital demographics will give them a new way to identify market opportunities for unmet customer needs.82%
  13. 13. 13 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE Beyond streamlining payment and customer service, new technologies make it possible for transportation providers to expand and transform loyalty programs with new offers and incentives. Such tech-enabled programs allow transit operators to capture unique moments to strengthen passenger relationships and drive revenue. Personalized playlists of music or podcasts can make the journey more pleasant. Recommendations and tickets for destination attractions provide passenger value. Discounts for products or services available along the way can create revenue-generating opportunities where none existed before. Curating those individualized, just-in-time experiences begins with a granular understanding of customers’ preferences and behaviors. Advanced customer analytics have provided a wealth of insights into what customers want and expect from the businesses with which they engage. Companies building their big data capabilities to offer personalized products and services include SNCF, Irish Rail, Rail Gourmet and Great Western Railway.13 Those insights can now be augmented with digital demographics. Today, technology interactions—and the digital fingerprints they leave behind— provide valuable information about how customers prefer to interact in the always- on world. The impact of this phenomenon is not lost on transportation executives. With the granular customer insights now available to transportation companies, it’s just a matter of time before leaders step forward with entirely new value propositions for passengers. Experiences that delight, surprise and exceed expectations not only make passenger journeys more enjoyable, but help to ensure that customers—customers like Charlotte—will return again and again. 76% of transportation executives agree that digital identities offer a more powerful way to understand customers. 82% believe that digital demographics give their organizations a new way to identify market opportunities for unmet customer needs. 70% report that digital demographics are expanding the number of ways they can deliver products and services.
  14. 14. 14 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE Siri knows Charlotte’s schedule and automatically checks traffic conditions on the morning of her meeting. Delays are likely, so Siri connects to an AI-based integrated route planner. Knowing Charlotte’s preferences, the tool books her optimized travel —all behind the scenes. Siri lets Charlotte know that an autonomous vehicle will pick her up at 7 am. It arrives on time, knowing exactly where Charlotte needs to go. When Charlotte arrives at the station, biometric tools recognize her. A kiosk welcomes her, letting her know that her train leaves in 10 minutes. She is then alerted that her train is ready for boarding on platform 5. As she walks to the platform, she books her seat on the transit app. Charlotte arrives at the downtown station, where an interactive screen welcomes her by name. She is offered 3 options of mobility to get to her final destination—with cost and time required for each. She chooses a dock bike and then accesses her transit app, which guides her to its location and allows her to unlock it. Once Charlotte has locked her bike in the docking station outside of her client’s office, her payment is processed. The app wishes her good luck at her sales pitch. An hour later, the integrated transit tool offers to coordinate Charlotte’s route back home or to her next destination. Pre-trip planning First-mile transport (to the station) Mid-mile transport (station to station) Last-mile transport (from the station) Post-trip experiences 6am 7am 7:10am 7:45am 7:55am 9am Charlotte’s enhanced journey offers seamless convenience
  15. 15. 15 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE OPPORTUNITY3 PASSENGER SAFETYAND DATA/NETWORK SECURITY Today’s ecosystem-dependent business world amplifies exponentially the impact of cyberattacks. Interconnectedness increases companies’ exposure to risks, and leading businesses are recognizing that while they already collaborate to deliver best-in-class products, services, and experiences, it is high time security joins that effort as well.” Accenture Technology Vision 2019 Trend: Secure Us To Secure Me “
  16. 16. In transportation, the issue of security has two facets. There is the security and safety of passengers during their journey. Then there is the security of customer data, as well as the operational and network data that is the lifeblood of a transit organization’s operations. Transportation organizations must industrialize both. In the area of passenger safety, video analytics, computer vision and AI can be combined to detect everything from aggressive facial expressions and body postures to suspicious objects in stations or along railway corridors. These technologies enable transportation authorities to take quick and pre-emptive steps to protect travelers and mitigate threats. Virtual reality (VR) solutions also improve passenger safety by creating immersive training environments that allow employees to interact with customers and objects in a lifelike virtual setting. MTR Crossrail and Arriva Train Wales are two organizations employing VR to strengthen situational awareness and teach employees how to identify risks that would be too dangerous to replicate in real life.14, 15 “Across industries and organizations, workers are incorporating technology to build on their own inherent skills and experience. The workforce is becoming “human+”: each individual is empowered by their skillsets and knowledge plus a new, constantly growing set of capabilities made possible through technology.” Accenture Technology Vision 2019 Trend: Human+ Worker 16 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE
  17. 17. Six Singapore government agencies recently piloted a solution aimed at ensuring public safety at various locations, including transportation hubs. The pilot showed that surveillance video feeds from various sources, social media data, GPS coordinates, and IoT sensor data could be fed through a central analytics platform to effectively predict crowd behaviors, coordinate resources and responses, and facilitate collaboration among various agencies. Crowd activities, crowd sizes and objects were all detected with greater than 85 percent accuracy.16 SAFETYFIRST:ONE GOVERNMENT’SRESPONSE 17 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE
  18. 18. While advances in technology are making passengers more secure, data and network vulnerabilities remain high. AI can be applied to detect cyberattacks, malware and suspicious user identities. But technological advances and the convergence of information technology (IT), operational technology (OT) and IoT devices are creating new vulnerabilities that expose rail and mass transit companies to new risks that require different approaches. The issue is more complicated for companies looking to provide passenger access to public Wi-Fi networks, capture digital identities of passengers to customize offers, or integrate additional services and data from third-parties. The inevitable introduction of autonomous vehicles into the multi-modal transportation network will provide millions more access points for malware or worse. Any ecosystem is only as secure as its weakest link. It is, therefore, essential to secure every digital asset, as well as every connection between that asset and other digital devices or the infrastructure and assets it helps run. On the surface, it seems that transportation leaders take ecosystem-based security threats seriously. Yet, it’s clear much more needs to be done; only 28 percent actually know that their ecosystem partners are working hard to strengthen their security. Mastering security is obviously critical for the safe operations of the transportation network. But security is also an increasingly important enabler of growth. If operators can’t assure customers that their data is safe, they will never gain their loyalty. They will also never gain access to the granular customer information that is needed to create the on-demand, personalized services passengers want—and would be willing to pay for. 18 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE 85% agree that organizations need to rethink their approach to security in a way that defends not just themselves, but their ecosystems. 46% of leaders believe the security posture of their ecosystem partners is extremely important.
  19. 19. OPPORTUNITY4 ASSETMANAGEMENT ANDOPTIMIZATION Leaders will be the ones best prepared to capitalize on the value of DARQ technologies as they progressively reach maturity.” Accenture Technology Vision 2019 Trend: DARQ Power “ 19 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE
  20. 20. Rail and transit organizations manage millions of assets, from rail cars, facilities and hundreds of miles of track to all the components that keep the trains running —and running on time. For nearly every rail and transit organization, keeping up with increasing demand, aging infrastructure and rising customer expectations is a constant challenge. The case for optimizing asset management and utilization is strong. Asset optimization produces better business and financial performance, greater efficiencies, more accurate planning and investment strategies, and better safety and reliability —which translate into better customer service. Asset optimization is also a critical component of organizations’ environmental sustainability initiatives. Assets running optimally require less energy and release fewer greenhouse gas emissions. Metro de Madrid, for example, has deployed a self-learning AI-based ventilation system that minimizes energy emissions and ensures good air quality in metro stations along the network. The solution has reduced energy costs for ventilation by 25 percent and cut CO2 emissions by 1,800 tons annually.17 As Metro de Madrid has demonstrated, new technologies make it possible for transportation companies to rethink how they manage and maintain their assets and operations. The possibilities are endless. AI, big data analytics, machine learning and the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) can be combined to optimize transit schedules and, equally important, recalibrate schedules and routes if a disruption occurs. Extended reality solutions can optimize maintenance outcomes by allowing employees to practice repairs in virtual surroundings and even receive real-time instruction through, for example, VR goggles. Quantum computing, still in its infancy, will give operators even more capacity to process millions, if not billions, of sensor readings and data inputs every second. 20 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE
  21. 21. The greatest benefit of new technologies to date can be seen in the proliferation of connected enterprise asset management solutions. IoT sensors and devices enable real-time monitoring and diagnostics of asset performance and provide a unified view via a system that is backed by data analytics. Combining AI, advanced analytics, machine learning and IIoT takes the guesswork and human errors out of preventative and predictive maintenance. With a connected approach, repairs and replacements occur exactly when they are needed, before the point of failure. Metro Transit – St. Louis, for example, implemented a predictive, condition-based replacement maintenance model that not only generated US$2.4 million in annual operational savings, but allowed the transit organization to gain three more years of service from its existing fleet.18 21 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE
  22. 22. GETTING ONTRACK. BECOMING FUTURE-READY. Emerging technologies are creating new opportunities for transportation organizations looking to improve their operations, business performance and customer experiences. To take advantage of these opportunities, companies must set the foundation for the transformational change that lies ahead. This means: 22 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE
  23. 23. Defining what it means to be post-digital Transportation companies still completing their digital transformations are looking for a specific edge, whether it’s an innovative service, higher efficiencies or more personalized passenger experiences. Post-digital companies are looking for much more. They are out to bypass the competition by changing the way mobility solutions and transportation operations are designed and delivered. Ask: What role are we prepared to play in a post-digital world characterized by on-demand, momentary markets? Which ecosystem partners will help us change the industry? What data/network risks do we face as a consequence of moving into the post-digital era—and are we adequately prepared to address them? Preparing for what’s next When it comes to enterprise-level technology strategies, transportation companies can never stop moving. Social, mobile, analytics and cloud (SMAC) capabilities are now expected. Without mastery of these technologies, companies will find it difficult to meet the most basic demands of a post- digital world. New technologies are the new game changers. Distributed ledgers, AI, extended reality and even quantum computing are poised to drive the post-digital wave of innovation and breakthrough business outcomes. But they also expose transit networks to new risks. Ask: Do we have the solid SMAC foundation we need to pivot to the New? Which emerging technologies will offer us and our passengers the greatest value? How can we shore up our data security and governance models to mitigate risks? What can we do to prepare our employees and customers for the technological change that is coming? Choosing the right destination Success means carefully choosing the opportunities to target—and, just as important, the ones not to target. Start by defining the outcomes that would benefit the organization and passengers most. With a clear objective, organizations can set a strategy and roadmap for achieving it. Ask: What can we do to make our passenger experiences better, safer and more convenient? What can we do to boost our organizational performance? What will allow us to achieve and sustain competitive advantage? 23 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE
  24. 24. New technologies are transporting the rail and transit industry to a post-digital world of new opportunities. Companies that depart for that world today will be among the first to arrive. They will be the first to experience and benefit from the future vision. All aboard. THETRAINISLEAVING THESTATION 24 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE
  25. 25. Note Unless otherwise stated, the statistics in this point of view represent transportation respondents in the survey report “Accenture Technology Vision 2019.” 25 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE 1. “Accenture Technology Vision 2019” (for more information, see “About the Research”). 2. Kelsey Campbell-Dollaghan, “The World’s Best Train System Is Powered By An Advanced AI Boss,” Gizmodo, July 7, 2014. 3. Anna Baydakova, “Swiss Railway Tests Blockchain Identities for Workplace Safety Boost,” Coindesk, November 22, 2018. 4. Jonathan Shieber, “Whim, the all-in-one mobility app for ridesharing, public transit and rentals is coming to the US,” January 2019. 5. https://citymapper.com/company 6. https://www.wienerlinien.at/eportal3/ ep/channelView.do/pageTypeId/66533/ channelId/-3600061 7. https://www.metro.net/projects/first-last/ 8. “Via to provide first-and-last mile services for LA Metro,” Metro Magazine, January 28, 2019. 9. https://www.sncf.com/en/group/profile-and- key-figures/about-us/who-we-are 10. Ashley Dudarenok, “From copycat to Goliath: A deep dive into China’s massive WeChat,” TNW, March 21, 2018. 11. Luke Thompson, “Shenzhen gets on the blockchain train,” Asia Times, March 21, 2019. 12. Maren Reinsch, “German rail operator use AI to fast-track responses to customer queries,” IBM, January 9, 2019. 13. Mark Simpson, “How technology improves the retail experience for both train operators and passengers,” Global Railway Review, March 9, 2018. 14. “Creating a train station in virtual reality with MTR Crossrail,” Railway Technology, September 11, 2018. 15. “Arriva introduces world’s first virtual reality platforms in support of train passenger safety across Wales,” Arriva, January 18, 2017. 16. “Accenture experience.” 17. “Accenture Helps Metro de Madrid Balance Energy Efficiency and Passenger Comfort with AI-Based Self-Learning Ventilation System,” Accenture Press Release, February 19, 2019. 18. “How Metro Transit - St. Louis realized $2.4 million annual savings,” Trapeze (case study), undated. REFERENCES
  26. 26. 26 TRANSIT IN TRANSITION TRANSPORTATION IN THE POST-DIGITAL AGE About the research Each year, the Accenture Technology Vision team partners with Accenture Research to pinpoint the emerging IT developments that will have the greatest impact on companies, government agencies, and other organizations in the coming years. In 2019, the process included a global survey of 6,672 business and IT executives from around the world. Survey respondents included 130 leaders in the passenger transportation sector from 12 countries. This report’s findings are based on analyses of their responses. Copyright © 2019 Accenture. All rights reserved. Accenture, its logo, and New Applied Now are trademarks of Accenture. This document makes descriptive reference to trademarks that may be owned by others. The use of such trademarks herein is not an assertion of ownership of such trademarks by Accenture and is not intended to represent or imply the existence of an association between Accenture and the lawful owners of such trademarks. Information regarding third- party products, services and organizations was obtained from publicly available sources, and Accenture cannot confirm the accuracy or reliability of such sources or information. Its inclusion does not imply an endorsement by or of any third party. The views and opinions in this article should not be viewed as professional advice with respect to your business. 190812 Contact the authors Alden Cuddihey Managing Director, Rail and Transit Global Lead alden.cuddihey@accenture.com Michael English Managing Director, Rail and Transit NA Lead michael.english@accenture.com Pierre-Oliver Desmurs Managing Director, Rail and Transit EALA Lead p-olivier.desmurs@accenture.com Claudio Bacalhau Managing Director, Rail and Transit AAPAC Lead claudio.bacalhau@accenture.com Theo Forbath Managing Director, Technology Advisory Products Lead theo.forbath@accenture.com About Accenture Accenture is a leading global professional services company, providing a broad range of services and solutions in strategy, consulting, digital, technology and operations. Combining unmatched experience and specialized skills across more than 40 industries and all business functions— underpinned by the world’s largest delivery network—Accenture works at the intersection of business and technology to help clients improve their performance and create sustainable value for their stakeholders. With 482,000 people serving clients in more than 120 countries, Accenture drives innovation to improve the way the world works and lives. Visit us at www.accenture.com. Stay connected @AccentureConslt @AccentureInd Accenture Consulting Accenture Industrial

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