Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Brief Introduction to Game Design

710 views

Published on

In this lecture, Dr. Lennart Nacke gives a brief introduction to the process of game design. He revisits existing definitions of games and talks about why games are systems with boundaries and rules. He then discusses the formal and dramatic elements of games.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

Brief Introduction to Game Design

  1. 1. BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO GAME DESIGN DR. LENNART NACKE, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
  2. 2. LENNART NACKE, BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO GAME DESIGN ONE DEFINITION OF A GAME ▸ A game is a system in which players engage in an artificial conflict, defined by rules, that results in a quantifiable outcome. ▸ The key elements of this definition are the fact that a game is a system, players interact with the system, a game is an instance of conflict, the conflict in games is artificial, rules limit player behaviour and define the game, and every game has a quantifiable outcome or goal.
  3. 3. LENNART NACKE, BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO GAME DESIGN GAMES AS SYSTEMS ▸ The Magic Circle ▸ A space that exists as a subset of reality with boundaries and rules ▸ Four main system elements 1. Objects 2. Attributes 3. Internal relationships 4. Environment ▸ Formal, cultural, or experiential systems
  4. 4. LENNART NACKE, BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO GAME DESIGN FORMAL ELEMENTS OF GAMES 1. Players 2. Objectives 3. Procedures 4. Rules 5. Resources 6. Conflict 7. Boundaries 8. Outcome
  5. 5. LENNART NACKE, BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO GAME DESIGN DRAMATIC ELEMENTS 1. Challenge 2. Play 3. Premise 4. Character 5. Story
  6. 6. LENNART NACKE, BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO GAME DESIGN CHALLENGE ▸ A sense of accomplishment and enjoyment ▸ Determined by the abilities of a specific player ▸ Individualized ▸ Dynamic ▸ Flow
  7. 7. LENNART NACKE, BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO GAME DESIGN PLAY ▸ Roger Caillois’s 4 types of play 1. Agôn (Competitive Play) 2. Alea (Chance-based Play) 3. Mimicry (Make-believe Play) 4. Ilinx (Vertigo Play) ▸ Along the dimension of freedom ▸ Ludus (Rule-based Play) ▸ Paida (Free-from, improvisational Play)
  8. 8. LENNART NACKE, BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO GAME DESIGN PREMISE SETS… ▸ Time ▸ Place ▸ Main character(s) ▸ Objective ▸ Action that propels the story forward ▸ Makes a game’s formal system playable for the user
  9. 9. LENNART NACKE, BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO GAME DESIGN CHARACTER ▸ Empathy propels their movement toward a resolution ▸ Protagonist (main character) ↔ Antagonist (main opponent) ▸ Methods of characterization ▸ Wants ▸ Needs ▸ Hopes ▸ Fears ▸ Round characters ↔ Flat characters ▸ Agency ↔ Empath
  10. 10. LENNART NACKE, BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO GAME DESIGN STORY (AS A DRAMATIC ELEMENT) ▸ Uncertain outcome fosters engagement ▸ Often backstory for ▸ Setting ▸ Main Conflict ▸ Story points in game progression ▸ Player choices affect game outcome ▸ Branching storylines ▸ Limited scope ▸ Story can emerge from gameplay
  11. 11. THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR YOUR ATTENTION THANK YOU Contact me: len@uwaterloo.ca @acagamic (Twitter) hcigames.com

×