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The Day of an Event
Television, The Internet, and Radio
The information:
• Is primarily provided through up-to-the-minute
    resources like broadcast news, Internet news
    sites, and news radio programs.
• Is quick, generally not detailed, and regularly
    updated.
• Explains the who, what, when, and where of an
    event.
• Can, on occasion, be inaccurate.
• Is written by authors who are primarily
    journalists.
• Is intended for a general audience.
The Day After An Event
Newspapers
The information:
• Is longer as newspaper articles begin to apply a
   chronology to an event and explain why the
   event occurred.
• Is more factual and provides a deeper
   investigation into the immediate context of
   events.
• Includes quotes from government officials and
   experts.
• May include statistics, photographs, and editorial
   coverage.
• Can include local perspectives on a story.
• Is written by authors who are primarily
   journalists.
• Is intended for a general audience.
The Weeks Following an Event
Weekly Popular Magazines and News Magazines
The information:
• Is contained in long form stories. Weekly
   magazines begin to discuss the impact of an
   event on society, culture, and public policy.
• Includes detailed analysis of events, interviews,
   as well as opinions and analysis.
• Offers perspectives on an event from particular
   groups or geared towards specific audiences.
• While often factual, information can reflect the
   editorial bias of a publication.
• Is written by a range of authors, from
   professional journalists, to essayists, to
   commentary by scholars or experts in the field.
• Is intended for a general audience or specific
   nonprofessional groups
Six Months to a Year After an Event and On...
Academic Journals
The information:
• Includes detailed analysis, empirical research
    reports, and learned commentary related to
    the event.
• Is often theoretical, carefully analyzing the
    impact of the event on society, culture, and
    public policy.
• Is peer-reviewed. This editorial process
    ensures high credibility and accuracy.
• Often narrow in topic.
• Written in a highly technical language.
• Includes detailed bibliographies.
• Is authored by scholars, researchers, and
    professionals, often with Ph.D's.
• Is intended for other scholars, researchers,
    professionals, and university students in the
• field.
A Year to Years After an Event and On...
Books
The information:
• Provides in-depth coverage of an event, often
   expanding and detailing themes, subjects, and
   analysis begun in academic research and
   published in journals.
• Often places an event into some sort of historical
   context.
• Can provide broad overviews of an event.
• Can range from scholarly in-depth analysis of a
   topic, to popular books which provide general
   discussions and are not as well-researched.
• Might have a bias or slant, but this dependent on
   the author.
• Includes bibliographies.
• Is often written by scholars, specialists,
   researchers, and professionals, though
   credentials of authors vary.
• Can be intended for a broad audience depending
   on the book, ranging from scholars to a general
   audience.
Years Later
Government Reports
The information:
• Comes from all levels of government from state, federal, and
   international governments
• Includes reports compiled by governmental organizations and
   summaries of government-funded research
• Is factual, often including statistical analysis
• Often focuses on an event in relation to public policy and legislation
• Authored by governmental panels, organizations, and committees
• Is intended for all audiences.

Reference Material
The information:
• Is considered established knowledge.
• Is published years after an event takes place, in encyclopedias,
   dictionaries, textbooks, and handbooks.
• Includes factual information, often in the form of overviews and
   summaries of an event.
• May include statistics and bibliographies.
• Often not as detailed as books or journal articles.
• Authored by scholars and specialists.
• Often intended for a general audience, but may be of use to
   researchers, scholars or professionals.

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Information timeline

  • 1.
  • 2.
  • 3.
  • 4.
  • 5.
  • 6. The Day of an Event Television, The Internet, and Radio The information: • Is primarily provided through up-to-the-minute resources like broadcast news, Internet news sites, and news radio programs. • Is quick, generally not detailed, and regularly updated. • Explains the who, what, when, and where of an event. • Can, on occasion, be inaccurate. • Is written by authors who are primarily journalists. • Is intended for a general audience.
  • 7. The Day After An Event Newspapers The information: • Is longer as newspaper articles begin to apply a chronology to an event and explain why the event occurred. • Is more factual and provides a deeper investigation into the immediate context of events. • Includes quotes from government officials and experts. • May include statistics, photographs, and editorial coverage. • Can include local perspectives on a story. • Is written by authors who are primarily journalists. • Is intended for a general audience.
  • 8. The Weeks Following an Event Weekly Popular Magazines and News Magazines The information: • Is contained in long form stories. Weekly magazines begin to discuss the impact of an event on society, culture, and public policy. • Includes detailed analysis of events, interviews, as well as opinions and analysis. • Offers perspectives on an event from particular groups or geared towards specific audiences. • While often factual, information can reflect the editorial bias of a publication. • Is written by a range of authors, from professional journalists, to essayists, to commentary by scholars or experts in the field. • Is intended for a general audience or specific nonprofessional groups
  • 9. Six Months to a Year After an Event and On... Academic Journals The information: • Includes detailed analysis, empirical research reports, and learned commentary related to the event. • Is often theoretical, carefully analyzing the impact of the event on society, culture, and public policy. • Is peer-reviewed. This editorial process ensures high credibility and accuracy. • Often narrow in topic. • Written in a highly technical language. • Includes detailed bibliographies. • Is authored by scholars, researchers, and professionals, often with Ph.D's. • Is intended for other scholars, researchers, professionals, and university students in the • field.
  • 10.
  • 11. A Year to Years After an Event and On... Books The information: • Provides in-depth coverage of an event, often expanding and detailing themes, subjects, and analysis begun in academic research and published in journals. • Often places an event into some sort of historical context. • Can provide broad overviews of an event. • Can range from scholarly in-depth analysis of a topic, to popular books which provide general discussions and are not as well-researched. • Might have a bias or slant, but this dependent on the author. • Includes bibliographies. • Is often written by scholars, specialists, researchers, and professionals, though credentials of authors vary. • Can be intended for a broad audience depending on the book, ranging from scholars to a general audience.
  • 12. Years Later Government Reports The information: • Comes from all levels of government from state, federal, and international governments • Includes reports compiled by governmental organizations and summaries of government-funded research • Is factual, often including statistical analysis • Often focuses on an event in relation to public policy and legislation • Authored by governmental panels, organizations, and committees • Is intended for all audiences. Reference Material The information: • Is considered established knowledge. • Is published years after an event takes place, in encyclopedias, dictionaries, textbooks, and handbooks. • Includes factual information, often in the form of overviews and summaries of an event. • May include statistics and bibliographies. • Often not as detailed as books or journal articles. • Authored by scholars and specialists. • Often intended for a general audience, but may be of use to researchers, scholars or professionals.

Editor's Notes

  1. The Day of an Event Television, The Internet, and RadioThe information:Is primarily provided through up-to-the-minute resources like broadcast news, Internet news sites, and news radio programs.Is quick, generally not detailed, and regularly updated.Explains the who, what, when, and where of an event.Can, on occassion, be inaccurate.Is written by authors who are primarily journalists.Is intended for a general audience.The Day After an Event NewspapersThe information:Is longer as newspaper articles begin to apply a chronology to an event and explain why the event occurred.Is more factual and provides a deeper investigation into the immediate context of events.Includes quotes from government officials and experts.May include statistics, photographs, and editorial coverage.Can include local perspectives on a story.Is written by authors who are primarily journalists.Is intended for a general audience.The Week of or Weeks After an Event Weekly Popular Magazines and News MagazinesThe information:Is contained in long form stories. Weekly magazines begin to discuss the impact of an event on society, culture, and public policy.Includes detailed analysis of events, interviews, as well as opinions and analysis.Offers perspectives on an event from particular groups or geared towards specific audiences.While often factual, information can reflect the editorial bias of a publication.Is written by a range of authors, from professional journalists, to essayists, to commentary by scholars or experts in the field.Is intended for a general audience or specific nonprofessional groups.Six Months to a Year After an Event and On...Academic JournalsThe information:Includes detailed analysis, empirical research reports, and learned commentary related to the event.Is often theoretical, carefully analyzing the impact of the event on society, culture, and public policy.Is peer-reviewed. This editorial process ensures high credibility and accuracy.Often narrow in topic.Written in a highly technical language.Includes detailed bibliographies.Is authored by scholars, researchers, and professionals, often with Ph.D's.Is intended for other scholars, researchers, professionals, and university students in the field.A Year to Years After an Event and On...BooksThe information:Provides in-depth coverage of an event, often expanding and detailing themes, subjects, and analysis begun in academic research and published in journals.Often places an event into some sort of historical context.Can provide broad overviews of an event.Can range from scholarly in-depth analysis of a topic, to popular books which provide general discussions and are not as well-researched.Might have a bias or slant, but this dependent on the author.Includes bibliographies.Is often written by scholars, specialists, researchers, and professionals, though credentials of authors vary.Can be intended for a broad audience depending on the book, ranging from scholars to a general audience.Government ReportsThe information:Comes from all levels of government from state, federal, and international governmentsIncludes reports compiled by governmental organizations and summaries of government-funded researchIs factual, often including statistical analysisOften focuses on an event in relation to public policy and legislationAuthored by governmental panels, organizations, and committeesIs intended for all audiences.Reference MaterialThe information:Is considered established knowledge.Is published years after an event takes place, in encyclopedias, dictionaries, textbooks, and handbooks.Includes factual information, often in the form of overviews and summaries of an event.May include statistics and bibliographies.Often not as detailed as books or journal articles.Authored by scholars and specialists.Often intended for a general audience, but may be of use to researchers, scholars or professionals.
  2. The Day of an Event Television, The Internet, and RadioThe information:Is primarily provided through up-to-the-minute resources like broadcast news, Internet news sites, and news radio programs.Is quick, generally not detailed, and regularly updated.Explains the who, what, when, and where of an event.Can, on occassion, be inaccurate.Is written by authors who are primarily journalists.Is intended for a general audience.The Day After an Event NewspapersThe information:Is longer as newspaper articles begin to apply a chronology to an event and explain why the event occurred.Is more factual and provides a deeper investigation into the immediate context of events.Includes quotes from government officials and experts.May include statistics, photographs, and editorial coverage.Can include local perspectives on a story.Is written by authors who are primarily journalists.Is intended for a general audience.The Week of or Weeks After an Event Weekly Popular Magazines and News MagazinesThe information:Is contained in long form stories. Weekly magazines begin to discuss the impact of an event on society, culture, and public policy.Includes detailed analysis of events, interviews, as well as opinions and analysis.Offers perspectives on an event from particular groups or geared towards specific audiences.While often factual, information can reflect the editorial bias of a publication.Is written by a range of authors, from professional journalists, to essayists, to commentary by scholars or experts in the field.Is intended for a general audience or specific nonprofessional groups.Six Months to a Year After an Event and On...Academic JournalsThe information:Includes detailed analysis, empirical research reports, and learned commentary related to the event.Is often theoretical, carefully analyzing the impact of the event on society, culture, and public policy.Is peer-reviewed. This editorial process ensures high credibility and accuracy.Often narrow in topic.Written in a highly technical language.Includes detailed bibliographies.Is authored by scholars, researchers, and professionals, often with Ph.D's.Is intended for other scholars, researchers, professionals, and university students in the field.A Year to Years After an Event and On...BooksThe information:Provides in-depth coverage of an event, often expanding and detailing themes, subjects, and analysis begun in academic research and published in journals.Often places an event into some sort of historical context.Can provide broad overviews of an event.Can range from scholarly in-depth analysis of a topic, to popular books which provide general discussions and are not as well-researched.Might have a bias or slant, but this dependent on the author.Includes bibliographies.Is often written by scholars, specialists, researchers, and professionals, though credentials of authors vary.Can be intended for a broad audience depending on the book, ranging from scholars to a general audience.Government ReportsThe information:Comes from all levels of government from state, federal, and international governmentsIncludes reports compiled by governmental organizations and summaries of government-funded researchIs factual, often including statistical analysisOften focuses on an event in relation to public policy and legislationAuthored by governmental panels, organizations, and committeesIs intended for all audiences.Reference MaterialThe information:Is considered established knowledge.Is published years after an event takes place, in encyclopedias, dictionaries, textbooks, and handbooks.Includes factual information, often in the form of overviews and summaries of an event.May include statistics and bibliographies.Often not as detailed as books or journal articles.Authored by scholars and specialists.Often intended for a general audience, but may be of use to researchers, scholars or professionals.
  3. The Day of an Event Television, The Internet, and RadioThe information:Is primarily provided through up-to-the-minute resources like broadcast news, Internet news sites, and news radio programs.Is quick, generally not detailed, and regularly updated.Explains the who, what, when, and where of an event.Can, on occassion, be inaccurate.Is written by authors who are primarily journalists.Is intended for a general audience.The Day After an Event NewspapersThe information:Is longer as newspaper articles begin to apply a chronology to an event and explain why the event occurred.Is more factual and provides a deeper investigation into the immediate context of events.Includes quotes from government officials and experts.May include statistics, photographs, and editorial coverage.Can include local perspectives on a story.Is written by authors who are primarily journalists.Is intended for a general audience.The Week of or Weeks After an Event Weekly Popular Magazines and News MagazinesThe information:Is contained in long form stories. Weekly magazines begin to discuss the impact of an event on society, culture, and public policy.Includes detailed analysis of events, interviews, as well as opinions and analysis.Offers perspectives on an event from particular groups or geared towards specific audiences.While often factual, information can reflect the editorial bias of a publication.Is written by a range of authors, from professional journalists, to essayists, to commentary by scholars or experts in the field.Is intended for a general audience or specific nonprofessional groups.Six Months to a Year After an Event and On...Academic JournalsThe information:Includes detailed analysis, empirical research reports, and learned commentary related to the event.Is often theoretical, carefully analyzing the impact of the event on society, culture, and public policy.Is peer-reviewed. This editorial process ensures high credibility and accuracy.Often narrow in topic.Written in a highly technical language.Includes detailed bibliographies.Is authored by scholars, researchers, and professionals, often with Ph.D's.Is intended for other scholars, researchers, professionals, and university students in the field.A Year to Years After an Event and On...BooksThe information:Provides in-depth coverage of an event, often expanding and detailing themes, subjects, and analysis begun in academic research and published in journals.Often places an event into some sort of historical context.Can provide broad overviews of an event.Can range from scholarly in-depth analysis of a topic, to popular books which provide general discussions and are not as well-researched.Might have a bias or slant, but this dependent on the author.Includes bibliographies.Is often written by scholars, specialists, researchers, and professionals, though credentials of authors vary.Can be intended for a broad audience depending on the book, ranging from scholars to a general audience.Government ReportsThe information:Comes from all levels of government from state, federal, and international governmentsIncludes reports compiled by governmental organizations and summaries of government-funded researchIs factual, often including statistical analysisOften focuses on an event in relation to public policy and legislationAuthored by governmental panels, organizations, and committeesIs intended for all audiences.Reference MaterialThe information:Is considered established knowledge.Is published years after an event takes place, in encyclopedias, dictionaries, textbooks, and handbooks.Includes factual information, often in the form of overviews and summaries of an event.May include statistics and bibliographies.Often not as detailed as books or journal articles.Authored by scholars and specialists.Often intended for a general audience, but may be of use to researchers, scholars or professionals.
  4. The Day of an Event Television, The Internet, and RadioThe information:Is primarily provided through up-to-the-minute resources like broadcast news, Internet news sites, and news radio programs.Is quick, generally not detailed, and regularly updated.Explains the who, what, when, and where of an event.Can, on occassion, be inaccurate.Is written by authors who are primarily journalists.Is intended for a general audience.The Day After an Event NewspapersThe information:Is longer as newspaper articles begin to apply a chronology to an event and explain why the event occurred.Is more factual and provides a deeper investigation into the immediate context of events.Includes quotes from government officials and experts.May include statistics, photographs, and editorial coverage.Can include local perspectives on a story.Is written by authors who are primarily journalists.Is intended for a general audience.The Week of or Weeks After an Event Weekly Popular Magazines and News MagazinesThe information:Is contained in long form stories. Weekly magazines begin to discuss the impact of an event on society, culture, and public policy.Includes detailed analysis of events, interviews, as well as opinions and analysis.Offers perspectives on an event from particular groups or geared towards specific audiences.While often factual, information can reflect the editorial bias of a publication.Is written by a range of authors, from professional journalists, to essayists, to commentary by scholars or experts in the field.Is intended for a general audience or specific nonprofessional groups.Six Months to a Year After an Event and On...Academic JournalsThe information:Includes detailed analysis, empirical research reports, and learned commentary related to the event.Is often theoretical, carefully analyzing the impact of the event on society, culture, and public policy.Is peer-reviewed. This editorial process ensures high credibility and accuracy.Often narrow in topic.Written in a highly technical language.Includes detailed bibliographies.Is authored by scholars, researchers, and professionals, often with Ph.D's.Is intended for other scholars, researchers, professionals, and university students in the field.A Year to Years After an Event and On...BooksThe information:Provides in-depth coverage of an event, often expanding and detailing themes, subjects, and analysis begun in academic research and published in journals.Often places an event into some sort of historical context.Can provide broad overviews of an event.Can range from scholarly in-depth analysis of a topic, to popular books which provide general discussions and are not as well-researched.Might have a bias or slant, but this dependent on the author.Includes bibliographies.Is often written by scholars, specialists, researchers, and professionals, though credentials of authors vary.Can be intended for a broad audience depending on the book, ranging from scholars to a general audience.Government ReportsThe information:Comes from all levels of government from state, federal, and international governmentsIncludes reports compiled by governmental organizations and summaries of government-funded researchIs factual, often including statistical analysisOften focuses on an event in relation to public policy and legislationAuthored by governmental panels, organizations, and committeesIs intended for all audiences.Reference MaterialThe information:Is considered established knowledge.Is published years after an event takes place, in encyclopedias, dictionaries, textbooks, and handbooks.Includes factual information, often in the form of overviews and summaries of an event.May include statistics and bibliographies.Often not as detailed as books or journal articles.Authored by scholars and specialists.Often intended for a general audience, but may be of use to researchers, scholars or professionals.
  5. The Day of an Event Television, The Internet, and RadioThe information:Is primarily provided through up-to-the-minute resources like broadcast news, Internet news sites, and news radio programs.Is quick, generally not detailed, and regularly updated.Explains the who, what, when, and where of an event.Can, on occassion, be inaccurate.Is written by authors who are primarily journalists.Is intended for a general audience.The Day After an Event NewspapersThe information:Is longer as newspaper articles begin to apply a chronology to an event and explain why the event occurred.Is more factual and provides a deeper investigation into the immediate context of events.Includes quotes from government officials and experts.May include statistics, photographs, and editorial coverage.Can include local perspectives on a story.Is written by authors who are primarily journalists.Is intended for a general audience.The Week of or Weeks After an Event Weekly Popular Magazines and News MagazinesThe information:Is contained in long form stories. Weekly magazines begin to discuss the impact of an event on society, culture, and public policy.Includes detailed analysis of events, interviews, as well as opinions and analysis.Offers perspectives on an event from particular groups or geared towards specific audiences.While often factual, information can reflect the editorial bias of a publication.Is written by a range of authors, from professional journalists, to essayists, to commentary by scholars or experts in the field.Is intended for a general audience or specific nonprofessional groups.Six Months to a Year After an Event and On...Academic JournalsThe information:Includes detailed analysis, empirical research reports, and learned commentary related to the event.Is often theoretical, carefully analyzing the impact of the event on society, culture, and public policy.Is peer-reviewed. This editorial process ensures high credibility and accuracy.Often narrow in topic.Written in a highly technical language.Includes detailed bibliographies.Is authored by scholars, researchers, and professionals, often with Ph.D's.Is intended for other scholars, researchers, professionals, and university students in the field.A Year to Years After an Event and On...BooksThe information:Provides in-depth coverage of an event, often expanding and detailing themes, subjects, and analysis begun in academic research and published in journals.Often places an event into some sort of historical context.Can provide broad overviews of an event.Can range from scholarly in-depth analysis of a topic, to popular books which provide general discussions and are not as well-researched.Might have a bias or slant, but this dependent on the author.Includes bibliographies.Is often written by scholars, specialists, researchers, and professionals, though credentials of authors vary.Can be intended for a broad audience depending on the book, ranging from scholars to a general audience.Government ReportsThe information:Comes from all levels of government from state, federal, and international governmentsIncludes reports compiled by governmental organizations and summaries of government-funded researchIs factual, often including statistical analysisOften focuses on an event in relation to public policy and legislationAuthored by governmental panels, organizations, and committeesIs intended for all audiences.Reference MaterialThe information:Is considered established knowledge.Is published years after an event takes place, in encyclopedias, dictionaries, textbooks, and handbooks.Includes factual information, often in the form of overviews and summaries of an event.May include statistics and bibliographies.Often not as detailed as books or journal articles.Authored by scholars and specialists.Often intended for a general audience, but may be of use to researchers, scholars or professionals.