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 A structure which makes hormones in the body is called
endocrine glands.
 They are also called ductless glands because ...
 Hypothalamus
 Pituitary gland
 Thyroid gland
 Parathyroid
 Thymus
 Pancreas
 Adrenal gland
 Testes
 Ovaries
 The hypothalamus is a portion of the brain that contains a
number of small nuclei with a variety of functions.
 One of ...
 The hypothalamus is responsible for
certain metabolic processes and other activities of
the autonomic nervous system.
 ...
 The pituitary gland, or hypophysis, is an endocrine
gland about the size of a pea and weighing 0.5 grams in
humans.
 It...
 Growth
 Blood pressure
 Some aspects of pregnancy and childbirth including stimulation
of uterine contractions during ...
 The thyroid gland or just thyroid is one of the
largest endocrine glands and consists of two
connected lobes.
 Each lob...
 The thyroid gland controls how quickly the body uses
energy, makes proteins, and controls how sensitive the
body is to o...
 There are four parathyroid glands, and they are each about
the size of a grain of rice.
 Though they’re located near ea...
 Parathyroid hormone regulates the body’s calcium levels.
 The parathyroid essentially helps the nervous and
muscular sy...
 The thymus is a specialized organ of the immune system.
 The thymus is composed of two identical lobes and is
located a...
 Helping the body protect itself against autoimmunity,
which occurs when the immune system turns against
itself.
 The th...
 The adrenal glands are two glands that sit on top of your
kidneys that are made up of two distinct parts- The adrenal
co...
 The adrenal cortex and the adrenal medulla have very
different functions. One of the main distinctions between
them is t...
 The pancreas is unique in that it’s both an endocrine and
exocrine gland. In other words, the pancreas has the dual
func...
 The pancreas maintains the body’s blood glucose (sugar)
balance.
 Primary hormones of the pancreas include insulin and
...
 The testes (or testicles) are a pair of sperm-producing
organs that maintain the health of the male reproductive
system....
 The testes secrete testosterone, which is necessary for
proper physical development in boys.
 In adulthood, testosteron...
 The ovaries are oval shaped and about the size of a large
grape.
 They are located on opposite ends of the pelvic wall,...
 The ovaries maintain the health of the female reproductive
system.
 Diseases associated with the ovaries include ovaria...
Endocrine glands
Endocrine glands
Endocrine glands
Endocrine glands
Endocrine glands
Endocrine glands
Endocrine glands
Endocrine glands
Endocrine glands
Endocrine glands
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Endocrine glands

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All endocrine glands

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Endocrine glands

  1. 1.  A structure which makes hormones in the body is called endocrine glands.  They are also called ductless glands because they do not have ducts to secrete their hormones.  A group of endocrine glands which produces various hormones is called an endocrine system. It is also called hormonal system.  Endocrine system helps in coordinating the activities of our body.
  2. 2.  Hypothalamus  Pituitary gland  Thyroid gland  Parathyroid  Thymus  Pancreas  Adrenal gland  Testes  Ovaries
  3. 3.  The hypothalamus is a portion of the brain that contains a number of small nuclei with a variety of functions.  One of the most important functions of the hypothalamus is to link the nervous system to the endocrine system via the pituitary gland.
  4. 4.  The hypothalamus is responsible for certain metabolic processes and other activities of the autonomic nervous system.  It synthesizes and secretes certain neurohormones, often called releasing hormones or hypothalamic hormones, and these in turn stimulate or inhibit the secretion of pituitary hormones.  The hypothalamus controls body temperature, hunger, fatigue, sleep, etc.
  5. 5.  The pituitary gland, or hypophysis, is an endocrine gland about the size of a pea and weighing 0.5 grams in humans.  It is composed of three lobes: anterior, intermediate, and posterior.
  6. 6.  Growth  Blood pressure  Some aspects of pregnancy and childbirth including stimulation of uterine contractions during childbirth  Breast milk production  Sex organ functions in both males and females  Thyroid gland function  The conversion of food into energy (metabolism)  Water and osmolarity regulation in the body  Water balance via the control of reabsorption of water by the kidneys  Temperature regulation  Pain relief
  7. 7.  The thyroid gland or just thyroid is one of the largest endocrine glands and consists of two connected lobes.  Each lobe is about 5 cm long, 3 cm wide and 2 cm thick.  The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped organ.  The thyroid gland is found in the neck, below the thyroid cartilage (which forms “Adam’s apple”).  It secretes throxine hormone also called T4  The thyroid also produces calcitonin, which plays a role in calcium homeostasis.
  8. 8.  The thyroid gland controls how quickly the body uses energy, makes proteins, and controls how sensitive the body is to other hormones.  These hormones regulate the growth and rate of function of many other systems in the body.  Thyroid hormones act throughout the body, influencing metabolism, growth and development, and body temperature.  During infancy and childhood, adequate thyroid hormone is crucial for brain development
  9. 9.  There are four parathyroid glands, and they are each about the size of a grain of rice.  Though they’re located near each other, the parathyroid glands are not related to the thyroid gland.  Parathyroid hormone (PTH) has a very powerful influence on the cells of your bones by causing them to release their calcium into the bloodstream.
  10. 10.  Parathyroid hormone regulates the body’s calcium levels.  The parathyroid essentially helps the nervous and muscular systems function properly.  Calcium is the primary element that causes muscles to contract, and calcium levels are very important to the normal conduction of electrical currents along nerves.  The most common disease of parathyroid glands is hyperparathyroidism, which is characterized by excess PTH hormone.
  11. 11.  The thymus is a specialized organ of the immune system.  The thymus is composed of two identical lobes and is located anatomically in the anterior superior mediastinum, in front of the heart and behind the sternum.  each lobe of the thymus can be divided into a central medulla and a peripheral cortex which is surrounded by an outer capsule.  The thymus is largest and most active during the neonatal and pre-adolescent periods.  The thymus produces and secretes thymosin.
  12. 12.  Helping the body protect itself against autoimmunity, which occurs when the immune system turns against itself.  The thymus plays a vital role in the lymphatic system (your body’s defence network) and endocrine system.  Protects the body from certain threats, including viruses and infections.
  13. 13.  The adrenal glands are two glands that sit on top of your kidneys that are made up of two distinct parts- The adrenal cortex and The adrenal medulla.  They are also known as suprarenal glands.  The adrenal glands are two, triangular-shaped organs that measure about 1.5 inches in height and 3 inches in length.
  14. 14.  The adrenal cortex and the adrenal medulla have very different functions. One of the main distinctions between them is that the hormones released by the adrenal cortex are necessary for life; those secreted by the adrenal medulla are not.
  15. 15.  The pancreas is unique in that it’s both an endocrine and exocrine gland. In other words, the pancreas has the dual function of secreting hormones into blood (endocrine) and secreting enzymes through ducts (exocrine).  The pancreas is a 6 inch-long flattened gland that lies deep within the abdomen, between the stomach and the spine. It is connected to the duodenum, which is part of the small intestine.  It secretes insulin.
  16. 16.  The pancreas maintains the body’s blood glucose (sugar) balance.  Primary hormones of the pancreas include insulin and glucagon, and both regulate blood glucose.  Diabetes is the most common disorder associated with the pancreas.
  17. 17.  The testes (or testicles) are a pair of sperm-producing organs that maintain the health of the male reproductive system.  The testes are twin oval-shaped organs about the size of a large grape.  They are located within the scrotum, which is the loose pouch of skin that hangs outside the body behind the penis.
  18. 18.  The testes secrete testosterone, which is necessary for proper physical development in boys.  In adulthood, testosterone maintains libido, muscle strength, and bone density.  Disorders of the testes are caused by too little testosterone production.
  19. 19.  The ovaries are oval shaped and about the size of a large grape.  They are located on opposite ends of the pelvic wall, on either side of the uterus.  The ovaries are each attached to the fimbria (tissue that connects the ovaries to the fallopian tube).  Ovaries produce and release two groups of sex hormones— progesterone and oestrogen.
  20. 20.  The ovaries maintain the health of the female reproductive system.  Diseases associated with the ovaries include ovarian cysts, ovarian cancer, menstrual cycle disorders, and polycystic ovarian syndrome.

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