Lt. James Iredell Waddell Responds To Three Topics Of Question

519 views

Published on

Lt. James Iredell Waddell Responds To Three Topics Of Question

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Lt. James Iredell Waddell Responds To Three Topics Of Question

  1. 1. Martin CJ Mongiello US History – HIS 1010, January 28, 2010 The Art Institute of Pittsburgh, PA Lieutenant James Iredell Waddell responds to three topics of question FREE LABOR: Let me tell you of the last shots fired in the flames of anger during the American Civil War - several months after General Lee surrendered, by myself. In the frozen wastes of the Sea of Okhotsk, my cannons were manned by free labor and the spirit of independence. With the ice storms, frigid weather upon us and myself a farm boy from Pittsboro, North Carolina - I lead a Confederate States Navy that embraced free labor - to survive. For is that not what we did in Melbourne when several dozen men freely signed up to serve in the Confederate States Navy? We had dozens of them join us. Also, please take note the United States Navy in which I served for twenty years – already had free blacks serving on board ships! Unlike the Army, we lived with the threat of death in each day on the oceans of the world and formed a common brotherhood of survival. Such is why I embrace free labor in all regards. Despite my cannon bringing the American Merchant Marine to its knees while my ship sailed the globe – I have no regrets. My feats crippled the Yankee fleets not to reach their prominence in the world ever again until WW I. A crushing and destructive blow that took 50 plus years to regain, beyond my life, on this earth. Let all remember what a simple landlubber from North Carolina could do on the globes waters – unleashed. Let all see what free men working together at sea can accomplish when faced with survival. The whip is not needed with slaves to win, my friends. It is not needed. STATES RIGHTS: Those of you reading may be surprised to find that, I had no contest in taking sides against the Federal flag. In my resignation letter to the Secretary of the Navy I stated, “In thus separating myself from association’s which I have cherished for twenty years, I wish it to be understood that no doctrine of the right of secession, no wish for disunion, of the state’s impel me, but simply because my home is the home of my people in the South, and I cannot bear arms against it or them” (Waddell 66). I sincerely regret and leaving my country and upon my arrival in New York that the navy yard, via the USS John Adams – I was faced with hate and angry comments at every turn against southerners. I had been gone for quite some time and see as far away as China – only to return to this mess that had been created by those living here. …
  2. 2. POPULAR SOVEREIGNTY: “The ridicule and contempt which ever attach to ignorance, rashness and rudeness in high places, was never more conspicuous then by the British authorities in that portion of their empire” (Waddell 136). Such is the treatment I and my crew received when we spent a month in Melbourne, Australia. I was constantly reminded of the fact that I am an advocate of popular sovereignty. Now that the war is over and my travels across the oceans and continents of the world are completed – I find myself once again back home. Housed in our fine country where those who are elected consider themselves to be servants. Such is the manner of most naval men who on a daily basis find themselves inside a floating prison, awash on the seas of the world. You will find that naval men espouse to 1the greatness of a flag that they fly under – which is why I tendered my letter directly to President Lincoln requesting that I be able to continue to support the greater country that I had served for twenty years at sea. Naval men, such as me, have little regard for the political mockery and carnival that some leaders desire to create for themselves in government. Now living in more modern times and being concerned for the growth of the government as we see it today – I offer a word of caution. Goldfield, David, Virginia Anderson, Jo Ann Argersinger, Peter Argersinger, William Barney, Carl Abbott and Robert Weir. The American Journey: Teaching and Learning Classroom Edition, Combined Volume, The American Journey, MyHistoryLab Series, Edition 5. New York, Boston, San Francisco, London, Toronto, Sydney, Tokyo, Mexico City, Paris, Cape Town, Hong Kong, Montreal: Prentice Hall, 2009. 404-405 Jones, Virgil. The Civil War at Sea. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1961. 119 “The day 45 Australians rowed of to fight those Yankees.” The Sydney Morning Herald Jan. 2010: http://www.smh.com.au/national/the-day-45-australians-rowed-off-to-fight- those-yankees-20100124-msm8.html Waddell, Alfred. Some memories of my life. Raleigh: Edwards & Broughton, 1908. 96- 97 Waddell, James, James Horan. C.S.S. Shenandoah, The Memoirs of Lieutenant Commanding James I. Waddell. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1960.

×