Why Localization? Or … “You mean Those People Don’t Speak English?”  DOCTRAIN EAST ‘07 Maxwell Hoffmann Manager Consulting...
About the Presenter <ul><li>Graphic Artist -> Typesetter -> DTP -> Localization </li></ul><ul><li>Worked for variety of pu...
Presentation Overview <ul><li>Global market pressures to Localize from overseas </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Events of past 20 ye...
Some Definitions <ul><li>Locale:  Combination of language, cultural preferences, character set, and other information that...
More Definitions <ul><li>Spanish:  An Iberian romance language spoken by over 350 million people worldwide. The official l...
Globalization is shrinking the world You are Here
We aren’t where we used to be <ul><li>In September of this year, the Canadian dollar passed the US in value for the first ...
The world has changed <ul><li>Ten years ago the U.S. stood at the epicenter of the web universe, English dominated the air...
Customers prefer buying from WWW sites in their own languages <ul><li>Nearly 3 out of 4 participants surveyed by Common Se...
Globalization: a confluence of events <ul><li>End of the Cold War </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Capitalism reaches Eastern Europe ...
Globalization: end of the Cold War <ul><li>Autumn 1989 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fall of Berlin Wall </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><l...
Former Soviet Republics become viable markets <ul><li>Now becoming common languages for Localization/Translation </li></ul...
Mobility of Manufacturing and Services <ul><li>General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade  (typically abbreviated  GATT ) </li...
Internet commerce eliminates boundaries <ul><li>English speakers now a  minority  on WWW </li></ul><ul><li>Developing coun...
The world has changed, but we haven’t <ul><li>Virtually all USA managers grew up during the Cold War </li></ul><ul><li>Int...
Change in the last 7 years <ul><li>In 2000, the three biggest countries by GDP were the U.S., Japan, and Germany.  </li></...
Balance of Language/Financial Power is shifting <ul><li>Top 10 economies in 2007 </li></ul>Source: “On the Web, Some Count...
Balance of Language/Financial Power is shifting - cont <ul><li>Probable top 10 economies in  2050 </li></ul>
What if you wanted to expand the reach of your web site?
Quiz: Which languages give you 76% of On-Line Access Population?  <ul><li>Question: name the 10 languages, in correct orde...
Quiz: How do you reach 88% of the most economically active users?  <ul><li>Question: which 5 languages do you add to Engli...
Domestic market forces <ul><li>Growth of Hispanic market </li></ul>
Demographics Summary <ul><li>Nearly 50% of USA Non-English speaking households speak English less than “very well” </li></...
Hispanic market predominates in the US non-English speaking space <ul><li>41% of new jobs have gone to Hispanic workers: <...
Markets you won’t want to ignore <ul><li>CALIFORNIA </li></ul><ul><li>7 th  largest world economy </li></ul><ul><li>Larges...
As goes California …  <ul><li>Between 1990 and 2010, California's Hispanic population will double, and the state's Asian p...
Domestic Spanish is diverse
Capitalizing on domestic Spanish <ul><li>Controlled English vendor experimented with 10 of the top FORD dealers in So. Cal...
Capitalizing, cont. <ul><li>P.s. – </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Car leases increased 2x fold for English-only speakers! </li></ul...
Challenges to Localization: or why you need professional help A sign in a Swiss hotel:  Because of the impropriety of ente...
Formality <ul><li>Japanese </li></ul><ul><li>拝啓 時下ますますご清祥のこととお慶び申し上げます。平素は、格別のご高配を賜りまして、厚くお礼申し上げます。 </li></ul><ul><li>Engl...
Foreign Text Issues Text expands when localized
Cultural Issues Lotus 1-2-3 was released in Japan without the ability to create radar charts—a common way to represent dat...
Cultural Issues--continued <ul><li>Numerics </li></ul><ul><li>Calendars, dates & time </li></ul><ul><li>Addresses and cont...
Example: Calendars <ul><li>Arabic </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Arabic countries use both Gregorian (Western) and Hijri (Islamic) ...
Layout and direction issues <ul><li>BiDirectional languages (Arabic) require that columns in tables be displayed in revers...
Linguistic Issues Word order changes in localized files.
A picture is worth a thousand words <ul><li>Cultural Localization when text is not used </li></ul><ul><li>Images may imply...
Unexpected international  reaction to simple icons Marijuana Death Scary  Alien Bird Sanctuary or Slippery Road Xmas Tree ...
These images are safe? Right? Perceived Existing  Interpretation Unexpected Answer None Cyclone, hypnotism, voodoo, mental...
Graphics So Obvious There Couldn’t Possibly Be an Issue Intended  Interpretation Unexpected Answer Iron Heavy Calcium Dog ...
What you can do to economize in Localization
Challenges with Graphics: Embedded graphics cost more in disc space and upload/download time Graphics that are “stapled” t...
Embedded captions, more $$$ Text w/in Graphics requires localization vendor to access text layers in original art, copy an...
Keyed captions, less $$$ Graphic callouts w/in table is part of main text flow: automatically extracted with main body tex...
Text dependent Artwork: a major “No - No” <ul><li>Product name supposed to fit w/in blue artwork </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hav...
How “Text/Art” can add $$$ <ul><li>77 instances of artwork  dependent on text </li></ul><ul><li>x 5 minutes  edit/fix/proo...
English version lacks “expansion”  depth 33% No expansion room No expansion room
Revised template =  expansion space reserved  for target languages
Plan  common column width  in USA source files for A4 paper <ul><li>US Eng doc size  = 8.5 in by 11 in </li></ul><ul><li>A...
About ENLASO
Best Resources Can Include <ul><li>Desktop Publishers </li></ul><ul><li>Engineers </li></ul><ul><li>Iconographers </li></u...
Core Services <ul><li>Aggregate the best resources </li></ul><ul><li>Manage risk </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Schedule </li></ul>...
Industry Leadership <ul><li>XML Internationalization and Localization written by ENLASO Engineer Yves Savourel </li></ul><...
Websites www.secondlife.com
GUI
Documentation
Consulting & Training Services <ul><li>Pre-flight software testing for Internationalization </li></ul><ul><li>Help determi...
Recommended Resources <ul><li>Common Sense Advisory: http://www.commonsenseadvisory.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>ENLASO tech doc...
Contact Information <ul><li>Maxwell Hoffmann Manager of Consulting & Training [email_address] (805) 494-9571 work phone </...
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Why Localization?: Or... "You Mean Those People Don't Speak English?"

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Presented at DocTrain East 2007 Conference by Maxwell Hoffmann, ENLASLO -- Although the many reasons to localize content should seem self-evident, many North American firms continue to maintain websites and product documentation in English-only. Many high-tech products initially penetrated markets where English was widely spoken by staff using expensive resources. In the 1990s, internet access and high bandwidth was typically available in some countries only with a workforce that had reasonable English language skills. The world has changed: as local overseas economies strengthen and internet connectivity becomes more available, non-English speakers have already become the majority on the internet. Web purchases are becoming common in populations segments that did not have internet access 8 or 9 years ago.

Because most North Americans don’t have a compelling reason to learn a second language, it is easy to ignore the proliferation of non-English speakers in key buying positions worldwide. But there is far more to it than that. Overseas customers who can speak English as a second language are far more comfortable purchasing products and services for which they fully understand documentation and warranty information.

Even if you have already “seen the light” regarding the compelling need to localize, chances are you have a challenge selling your upper management on this concept. This session will cover critical data points that support your campaign to move your company into non-English markets. The session will also explode some of the many myths that executives pick up in airline magazines, including the fantasy that a “black box” machine translation solution will allow you to penetrate markets in China. The possibilities for expressing your message effectively in any language are nearly limitless. The key is finding the critical requirements of your targeted locale, as well as the country.

The presenter will cover the most common pitfalls that newcomers stumble over, from trying to eliminate critical preparation to letting a company employee do the translation “in their spare time.” Although there can be significant set up costs involved in localization, the return on investment is considerable and easily measurable. Actual metrics will be shared to show how you will recoup your investment when you localize. This is one presentation that you cannot afford to miss.

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Why Localization?: Or... "You Mean Those People Don't Speak English?"

  1. Why Localization? Or … “You mean Those People Don’t Speak English?” DOCTRAIN EAST ‘07 Maxwell Hoffmann Manager Consulting & Training ENLASO www.translate.com
  2. About the Presenter <ul><li>Graphic Artist -> Typesetter -> DTP -> Localization </li></ul><ul><li>Worked for variety of publishing solution vendors: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Expert on doc format and data migration </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Former FrameMaker product marketing mgr </li></ul><ul><li>10 years in Localized publishing, production, and consulting </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Conversant with issues unique to multilingual production </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Trained over 1,000 people in past 25 years on variety of publishing solutions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Worked primarily with content creators and tech writers </li></ul></ul>
  3. Presentation Overview <ul><li>Global market pressures to Localize from overseas </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Events of past 20 years changed worldwide markets forever </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Domestic market pressures to Localize </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Growing Hispanic market impossible to ignore </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Multinational supply chains affect “English only” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Spotlight on Domestic Hispanic Market </li></ul><ul><li>Challenges to localization </li></ul><ul><li>How to prep your content for more economic localized projects </li></ul>
  4. Some Definitions <ul><li>Locale: Combination of language, cultural preferences, character set, and other information that describes a particular target market or audience. </li></ul><ul><li>Globalization (G11N): Implementation of a global strategy that ensures the product or deliverable meets the needs of each locale, from early product development through localization. </li></ul><ul><li>Internationalization (I18N): Process of creating (or re-engineering) a product or deliverable to support difference locales. Usually a pre-requisite for successful localization. </li></ul><ul><li>Localization (L10N): Process of adapting a product for a particular locale. Usually comes after internationalization, creating a deliverable that has the look and feel of being created for the specific locale. </li></ul><ul><li>Interpretation: Converting real-time spoken content in a source language into spoken content in a target language, either simultaneously or sequentially. </li></ul><ul><li>Translation: Process of translating, editing and proofing textual content from a source language to a target language. </li></ul>
  5. More Definitions <ul><li>Spanish: An Iberian romance language spoken by over 350 million people worldwide. The official language of more than 20 countries (and “official/unofficial” recognition in one state in the US –New Mexico). Includes 9 other closely related languages. </li></ul><ul><li>Hispanic refers to a derivation from Spain, its people and culture. </li></ul><ul><li>Indo-European Languages: Includes most languages of Europe and the Indic languages of India. These include the Germanic, Scandinavian, Romance, Baltic, Slavic, Iranian, Hindi, and Urdu languages. </li></ul><ul><li>Asian and Pacific Island languages: Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Vietnam, Hmong, Khmer, Lao, Thai, Tagalog. </li></ul><ul><li>Other languages: Includes Uralic (Hungarian), Semitic (Arabic & Hebrew), African, and native North American languages along with indigenous languages of Central and South America. </li></ul>
  6. Globalization is shrinking the world You are Here
  7. We aren’t where we used to be <ul><li>In September of this year, the Canadian dollar passed the US in value for the first time in 31 years! </li></ul>
  8. The world has changed <ul><li>Ten years ago the U.S. stood at the epicenter of the web universe, English dominated the airwaves, and the dollar stood supreme. Today the U.S. is sixteenth worldwide in the percentage of its residents with broadband access to the internet and falling way behind in connection speed, China is coming on strong, and the dollar threatens to be supplanted by the Euro as the world’s favorite currency. </li></ul>Source: On the Web, Some Countries Matter More than Others Quantifying the Market Opportunity for Globalizing the Web Customer Experience -- By Donald A. DePalma, Benjamin B. Sargent, and R. Michael Powers
  9. Customers prefer buying from WWW sites in their own languages <ul><li>Nearly 3 out of 4 participants surveyed by Common Sense Advisory agreed that they were more likely to buy from sites in their own languages than in English. </li></ul><ul><li>Global consumers will pay more for products with information in their language. </li></ul><ul><li>Nearly 3 out of 4 participants surveyed agreed they are more likely to buy products if after sale support is in their own language. </li></ul>Source: Can't Read, Won't Buy: Why Language Matters on Global Websites By Donald DePalma, Benjamin Sargent and Renato Benianatto Common Sense Advisory, Sept 2006
  10. Globalization: a confluence of events <ul><li>End of the Cold War </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Capitalism reaches Eastern Europe </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chinese economy thaws to the West </li></ul></ul><ul><li>European Union (economy and language requirements.) </li></ul><ul><li>GATT and WTO (General Agreement on Trade and Tariffs and World Trade Org.) </li></ul><ul><li>NAFTA (Canada/USA/Mexico trade) and immigration </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Spanish on your doorstep </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Growth of Internet and “dot.com” boom </li></ul><ul><li>Y2K and growth of India/off-shoring </li></ul>
  11. Globalization: end of the Cold War <ul><li>Autumn 1989 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fall of Berlin Wall </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tiananmen Square stand off, Beijing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>End of Soviet Union by 1991 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>End of the “Cold War” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Huge new market opens that was “out of sight, out of mind” for 77 years </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>China liberalizes economic policies, becomes world power economy over night </li></ul></ul>
  12. Former Soviet Republics become viable markets <ul><li>Now becoming common languages for Localization/Translation </li></ul><ul><li>Significant “Soviet Satellite” Languages: </li></ul><ul><li>Hungarian </li></ul><ul><li>Polish </li></ul><ul><li>Czech </li></ul>
  13. Mobility of Manufacturing and Services <ul><li>General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (typically abbreviated GATT ) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Uruguay Round from 1986 to 1994, extended the agreement fully to new areas such as intellectual property, services, capital, and agriculture. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Out of this round the WTO (World Trade Org) was born. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Manufacturing (and Services) have moved offshore; more documentation not in English </li></ul></ul>
  14. Internet commerce eliminates boundaries <ul><li>English speakers now a minority on WWW </li></ul><ul><li>Developing countries using cell phones for internet more </li></ul><ul><li>Rental kiosks making Internet shopping available to villages in India </li></ul><ul><li>Shoppers with limited English twice as likely to buy when WWW site is their own language </li></ul><ul><li>Hispanic (Latin America Spanish) is fastest emerging market domestically </li></ul>
  15. The world has changed, but we haven’t <ul><li>Virtually all USA managers grew up during the Cold War </li></ul><ul><li>Internet commerce is recent ; global impact not obvious to everyone </li></ul><ul><li>We (USA) live (almost) in entirely in an English-only environment </li></ul><ul><li>We (USA) have a fairly homogenous popular culture </li></ul><ul><li>Translation and Localization is still an afterthought for many domestic enterprises </li></ul>
  16. Change in the last 7 years <ul><li>In 2000, the three biggest countries by GDP were the U.S., Japan, and Germany. </li></ul><ul><li>The next four were France , Italy, the U.K., and China. </li></ul><ul><li>Seven years later China made it to the fourth slot. </li></ul>Source: “On the Web, Some Countries Matter More than Others” by Common Sense Advisory
  17. Balance of Language/Financial Power is shifting <ul><li>Top 10 economies in 2007 </li></ul>Source: “On the Web, Some Countries Matter More than Others” by Common Sense Advisory
  18. Balance of Language/Financial Power is shifting - cont <ul><li>Probable top 10 economies in 2050 </li></ul>
  19. What if you wanted to expand the reach of your web site?
  20. Quiz: Which languages give you 76% of On-Line Access Population? <ul><li>Question: name the 10 languages, in correct order: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>English </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>French </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Italian </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>German </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spanish </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Japanese </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chinese-Simplified </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Korean </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Russian </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Swedish </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Portuguese </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chinese-Traditional </li></ul></ul><ul><li>ANSWER </li></ul><ul><ul><li>English </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chinese-Simplified </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Japanese </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spanish </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>German </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Portuguese </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>French </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Korean </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Italian </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Russian </li></ul></ul>Source: “On the Web, Some Countries Matter More than Others” by Common Sense Advisory
  21. Quiz: How do you reach 88% of the most economically active users? <ul><li>Question: which 5 languages do you add to English to reach 88% of “spending” Internet users? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Chinese-Simplified </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Japanese </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spanish </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>German </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Portuguese </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>French </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Korean </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Italian </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Russian </li></ul></ul><ul><li>ANSWER </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Japanese </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>German </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spanish (incl. USA) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>French </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Italian </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ FIGS-J” </li></ul></ul>Source: “On the Web, Some Countries Matter More than Others” by Common Sense Advisory
  22. Domestic market forces <ul><li>Growth of Hispanic market </li></ul>
  23. Demographics Summary <ul><li>Nearly 50% of USA Non-English speaking households speak English less than “very well” </li></ul><ul><li>Some metro areas have majority populations who do not speak English very well </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Downtown L.A. = 8 out of 10 people from “somewhere else” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Both the Hispanic and Asian-Pacific populations have increased over 50% in 10 years </li></ul><ul><li>The Hispanic population is the largest Non-English speaking group in the US (~60% of Mexican heritage) </li></ul>
  24. Hispanic market predominates in the US non-English speaking space <ul><li>41% of new jobs have gone to Hispanic workers: </li></ul><ul><li>2.4M jobs since May 2005, nearly 1M to the Hispanic workers. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Growth rate of the Hispanic market </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Growth rate of 7.7% per year </li></ul><ul><ul><li>three times the average US household value </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Currently nearly $700 Billion, $250 Billion from “low income” populations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Projected at over $1 Trillion by 2010 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>2 million small and midsize Hispanic-owned U.S. businesses to grow to 8 million by 2010 </li></ul>
  25. Markets you won’t want to ignore <ul><li>CALIFORNIA </li></ul><ul><li>7 th largest world economy </li></ul><ul><li>Largest USA automotive market </li></ul><ul><li>As goes California, so goes the nation … </li></ul>
  26. As goes California … <ul><li>Between 1990 and 2010, California's Hispanic population will double, and the state's Asian population will grow by two-thirds. </li></ul><ul><li>The projected growth in the state's white (non-Hispanic) population is only 13 percent over the same period, so that by 2010: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>More than half (54 percent) of California's population will be Hispanic, Asian, or Black. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More than two-thirds of school-age children will be Hispanic, Asian, or Black. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The population over 50 years old, however, will remain predominantly white (non-Hispanic.) </li></ul></ul>Source: California Legislative Analyst’s Office
  27. Domestic Spanish is diverse
  28. Capitalizing on domestic Spanish <ul><li>Controlled English vendor experimented with 10 of the top FORD dealers in So. California </li></ul><ul><li>Contracts and Leases were transformed with simplified/controlled English </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Contracts/Leases then translated into Latin American Spanish </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>FORD leases increased 3.5 times for Spanish Speakers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Note: nearly all of the Spanish Speakers had some fluency in English </li></ul></ul>
  29. Capitalizing, cont. <ul><li>P.s. – </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Car leases increased 2x fold for English-only speakers! </li></ul></ul>
  30. Challenges to Localization: or why you need professional help A sign in a Swiss hotel: Because of the impropriety of entertaining guests of the opposite sex in the bedroom, it is suggested that the lobby be used for this purpose.
  31. Formality <ul><li>Japanese </li></ul><ul><li>拝啓 時下ますますご清祥のこととお慶び申し上げます。平素は、格別のご高配を賜りまして、厚くお礼申し上げます。 </li></ul><ul><li>English </li></ul><ul><li>Greetings, we are glad to hear that things are going well for you. I would like to express my appreciation for your loyal patronage. </li></ul>
  32. Foreign Text Issues Text expands when localized
  33. Cultural Issues Lotus 1-2-3 was released in Japan without the ability to create radar charts—a common way to represent data graphically in Japan.
  34. Cultural Issues--continued <ul><li>Numerics </li></ul><ul><li>Calendars, dates & time </li></ul><ul><li>Addresses and contact info </li></ul><ul><li>Names </li></ul><ul><li>Currency </li></ul><ul><li>Sorting </li></ul>
  35. Example: Calendars <ul><li>Arabic </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Arabic countries use both Gregorian (Western) and Hijri (Islamic) dates. Hijri date is the official date in Saudi Arabia, the largest Arabic market. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Four different sets of month names are used in Arabic and applications need to provide for a user-selectable set of month names. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Month names can be either Gregorian or Hijri months, and either the Latin or Arabic alphabet might be used to write them. </li></ul></ul>
  36. Layout and direction issues <ul><li>BiDirectional languages (Arabic) require that columns in tables be displayed in reverse order </li></ul>
  37. Linguistic Issues Word order changes in localized files.
  38. A picture is worth a thousand words <ul><li>Cultural Localization when text is not used </li></ul><ul><li>Images may imply potent, even politically explosive issues in some cultures </li></ul><ul><li>You cannot assume that an image “innocuous” to western eyes will be accepted overseas </li></ul><ul><li>Following examples are from rejected icons that McDonald’s had ENLASO culturally evaluate for global acceptance. </li></ul>Creating a New Language for Nutrition: McDonald’s Universal Icons for 109 Countries by Maxwell Hoffmann
  39. Unexpected international reaction to simple icons Marijuana Death Scary Alien Bird Sanctuary or Slippery Road Xmas Tree or Candle Better Fiber Visual Plant of Some sort
  40. These images are safe? Right? Perceived Existing Interpretation Unexpected Answer None Cyclone, hypnotism, voodoo, mental problems, dizziness, danger None Danger, cyclones, Bad storms / omens None Planned Use Calories Calories Sugar Female genitalia / fertility symbol, gambling, road hazard
  41. Graphics So Obvious There Couldn’t Possibly Be an Issue Intended Interpretation Unexpected Answer Iron Heavy Calcium Dog Food (potentially explosive in Muslim culture)
  42. What you can do to economize in Localization
  43. Challenges with Graphics: Embedded graphics cost more in disc space and upload/download time Graphics that are “stapled” to page (float), not anchored, will disappear
  44. Embedded captions, more $$$ Text w/in Graphics requires localization vendor to access text layers in original art, copy and paste localized text. More billable time.
  45. Keyed captions, less $$$ Graphic callouts w/in table is part of main text flow: automatically extracted with main body text; view for linguist is more logical.
  46. Text dependent Artwork: a major “No - No” <ul><li>Product name supposed to fit w/in blue artwork </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Have to manually resize all instances of such artwork </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Word order can change in language (e.g “Interna” should be w/in the blue artwork) </li></ul></ul>BEFORE : AFTER :
  47. How “Text/Art” can add $$$ <ul><li>77 instances of artwork dependent on text </li></ul><ul><li>x 5 minutes edit/fix/proof </li></ul><ul><li>x 6 languages </li></ul><ul><li>=========== </li></ul><ul><li>= 38.5 extra billable hours </li></ul>
  48. English version lacks “expansion” depth 33% No expansion room No expansion room
  49. Revised template = expansion space reserved for target languages
  50. Plan common column width in USA source files for A4 paper <ul><li>US Eng doc size = 8.5 in by 11 in </li></ul><ul><li>A4 Euro doc size = 8.268 in by 11.693 in </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Common text column width between templates avoids manually resizing tables and graphics </li></ul></ul>This table would have to be resized
  51. About ENLASO
  52. Best Resources Can Include <ul><li>Desktop Publishers </li></ul><ul><li>Engineers </li></ul><ul><li>Iconographers </li></ul><ul><li>Labeling Experts </li></ul><ul><li>Process Analysts </li></ul><ul><li>Internationalization Engineers </li></ul><ul><li>Customer Satisfaction experts </li></ul>
  53. Core Services <ul><li>Aggregate the best resources </li></ul><ul><li>Manage risk </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Schedule </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Price </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quality </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Introduce efficiencies </li></ul><ul><li>Guarantee quality </li></ul>
  54. Industry Leadership <ul><li>XML Internationalization and Localization written by ENLASO Engineer Yves Savourel </li></ul><ul><li>Available on Amazon.com </li></ul><ul><li>Considered to be the defining book on XML Internationalization and Localization </li></ul>
  55. Websites www.secondlife.com
  56. GUI
  57. Documentation
  58. Consulting & Training Services <ul><li>Pre-flight software testing for Internationalization </li></ul><ul><li>Help determine best file format for document resources </li></ul><ul><li>Migration of high volume projects from Word to XML or FrameMaker </li></ul><ul><li>Structured FrameMaker development </li></ul><ul><li>Localized Template development </li></ul><ul><li>Project Manager training </li></ul>
  59. Recommended Resources <ul><li>Common Sense Advisory: http://www.commonsenseadvisory.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>ENLASO tech doc resources: www.translate.com/framemaker </li></ul><ul><li>GALA or LISA membership </li></ul>
  60. Contact Information <ul><li>Maxwell Hoffmann Manager of Consulting & Training [email_address] (805) 494-9571 work phone </li></ul>

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