Social Media: What's In It For You?

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Businesses are seeing the value of social media, and are chomping at the bit to get started. How, though? The first two steps are to determine your objectives and listen. This presentation reviews how you can do those steps.

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  • http://www.NEDMA.comhttp://research.microsoft.com/en-us/labs/newengland/visit.aspxhttp://www.lauravecchio.com/http://www.ovrdrv.comhttp://www.subjectivelyspeaking.net/http://www.PTC.com
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIFYPQjYhv8Note that this has tons of dataIt’s really coolI can source itIt’s also an adIt’s also a place to have a dialogue and conversation on the topic (the comments section)Erik can visit it and interact with fans and detractors, etc.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/uncledave981/3145772436/
  • How do you define ‘social media’?Really focus on the two words separately then togetherIt’s not just setting up a Facebook Fanpage and waiting for trafficDo you think it’s only a fad, a passing trend?Why you should you (and shouldn’t) get involved=-=-=-=-Who We are Alan Belniak; recovering engineer; former Mathcad Product Manager at PTC;been with PTC since June 2007Laura Vecchio, …What we’re going to cover today (‘what’ and the ‘how’)Overview of some tools that you can use to connect with current and prospective customers and help understand their needs and desiresWe will not be talking about a silver bulletAsk questions throughoutThis is a multi-way dialogue. If you can’t get your question in, we’ll find other ways to continue this discussion.image source: gregverdino.typepad.com/.../social-media-ho.html
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/nationaalarchief/3774885828/sizes/o/
  •  From the socialnomics video (original data source in the book)Consider that the workforce is changing. People are retiring and being replaced/supplemented with 22-year olds. These people are digital natives. They grew up with this.image sources: http://michaelcorey.ntirety.com/blog/tabid/51101/bid/8760/Should-CEO-s-use-Facebook-Twitter.aspx ; Microsoft Excel chart
  • You think this is a silver bullet. You think this is going to, overnight, increase your lead generation by 1000 percent. You feel like you have to, so you do so, but begrudgingly and only with half the effort.Quote source: Brian Solis, principal at FutureWorks (“Human interaction is still human interaction, and what it takes to be successful with it has not changed. What has changed is the places where it happens.”) image source: realestatedementia.com/?p=39
  • image source:www.nileseldredge.com/companion.htm
  • source: http://www.forrester.com/Groundswell/profile_tool.html
  • source: Business.com’s 2009 B2B Social Media Benchmarking Study (http://www.business.com/info/b2b-social-media-benchmark-study)
  • http://www.visualizingeconomics.com/2008/02/18/adoption-of-new-technology-since-1900/
  • Why is this a big deal all of the sudden?Change in landscape and consumer media consumptionPC prices went down, broadband penetration went up, anyone can be a blogger these daysForrester Social Technographics dataThis isn’t just conjecture – there is research behind thisPush v. pull; customers telling you what they want versus you giving customers few choices=-=-=-=-=-=-Quick history: Internet gained popularity, marketers saw a new channel, but still used 1.0, one-way communications… think newspapers and blaring TV adsImage source: http://www.socialmediatoday.com/SMC/106502
  • Quick history: Internet gained popularity, marketers saw a new channel, but still used 1.0, one-way communications… think newspapers and blaring TV adsImage source: http://www.socialmediatoday.com/SMC/106502
  • Broadband is now everywhere; telecommunication prices drop; most everyone has much broader accessibilityNo credentials to become a blogger (unlike journalism); tools to blog become free and ubiquitous (there’s a blogging *template* inside Microsoft Word!)Everyone is a blogger these days…Fundamental shift from a 1.0 tool to a 2.0 tool… this is what it means when people say “Web 2.0”; it permits feedback back to the author and between other consumers of that informationImage source: http://www.socialmediatoday.com/SMC/106502
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIFYPQjYhv8Look at the public metrics – I can measure it.I can interact with the people who have seen it.Can you do this with a billboard?
  • It’s a good thing for companies, because consumers can share their feedback about products.It’s a bad thing for companies, because consumers can share their feedback about products.Image source: www.liv.ac.uk/Library/gifs/vis_feedback.jpg
  • It’s a good thing for companies, because consumers can share their feedback about products.It’s a bad thing for companies, because consumers can share their feedback about products.Image sources: www.liv.ac.uk/Library/gifs/vis_feedback.jpg ; http://www.wired.com/news/images/full/krypto2_f.jpg http://www.wired.com/culture/lifestyle/news/2004/09/64987
  • What social media isn’tSocial media is not a new name for technology. Old school media was push and broadcast. Social means interaction among people. Together, it’s a way to freely and openly discuss news, items, events. It’s about engagement and communication.It is not about using 2.0 tools for a 1.0 message.
  • What social media isn’tSocial media is not a new name for technology. Old school media was push and broadcast. Social means interaction among people. Together, it’s a way to freely and openly discuss news, items, events. It’s about engagement and communication.It is not about using 2.0 tools for a 1.0 message.
  • Say you ran a business and you only had ten customers (and you only needed ten customers to remain sustainable and/or profitable).  You obviously care a lot about what these ten customers have to say about you, your company, your brand, and your products, because they are your only ten customers.  You really want to know what makes them tick.  To the extent that you can, you’d tailor your offerings to make them happy, because if they are happy, they keep returning.  Maybe they’ll even tell a friend, and soon you might have eleven customers.  So, you engage in conversations with these ten customers.  You ask them what you do right, what you do wrong, what they like about the products you sell, what else you can add to round out your offering… you get the idea.  And they tell you.  Because you asked.  They say that the prices are OK, but the quality could be better.  Point noted, you say.  They say that the green and the blue widgets are nice, but red ones would be nice, too.  Another great point.  You work to get these changes into your product line.Here’s where it gets good: would you have ever known that people really wanted red widgets (what’s wrong with green and blue)?  Or that the price was actually OK (you thought it was kind of high)?  No.  But if you ask people what they think, they’ll often tell you.  The reality is, you have more than ten customers.  You have tens of thousands of customers.  But that doesn’t obviate the need to do the same exercise.  You just need to find a new way to do it.  This is what it means to be social.  Your medium in this case was a face-to-face conversation.The point of social media is really using the second word to emphasize the first.  Use the “new” web 2.0 tools to be more social, permit two-way exchange of ideas, and bring those ideas back into the organization to affect change.  Otherwise, it’s just broadcast media.image content: author original; image source: http://www.wordle.net
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/nationaalarchief/3896157644/
  • What social media isn’tTake-away: it’s not about the technology. If you think it is, do one of two things:stop listening and reading because the rest of this session is about using tools to help you have conversations that could potentially turn into sales leads, or fundamentally change your understanding of what it is. Do not expect to walk away from this session with a silver-bullet strategy for Twitter that will get you 5,000 new deals next quarter. That’s not how it works.This is something that needs to be worked at. However, it’s not something that has to be additive. Rather, it can replace some of the work you’re already doing to generate leads.image source: http://www.salvoweb.com/images/userimgs/11089/44310_1.jpg; http://arunrajagopal.com/2007/12/; http://www.flatrock.org.nz/topics/working/quick_get_me_rich.htm
  • http://blogs.forrester.com/photos/uncategorized/2007/12/11/post_method_2.jpg http://beth.typepad.com/beths_blog/2009/01/creating-your-organizations-social-media-strategy-map.html
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/library_of_virginia/2898490491/sizes/o/
  • http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3305/3223086466_07409c8084.jpgAfter answering these questions, we will transition into how Overdrive has established a 9-step process to approaching social media.
  • The following show you which tools to allow you to start skimming the surface to help you start listening and understand how your brand can live in social media. To get this interactive map, head over to http://ovrdrv.com/maps/
  • Social Media: What's In It For You?

    1. 1. Social Media: What’s in it for You?<br />Presented by:Alan Belniak & Laura Vecchio<br />January 21, 2010<br />
    2. 2. Social Media: What’s in it for You?<br />A NEDMA Event<br />January 21, 2010 ~ 9:00a to 11:30a<br />At the Microsoft Research Facility, Cambridge<br />Presented by:<br />Laura Vecchio<br />Online Marketing Coordinator/Social Media Specialist<br />Overdrive Interactive<br />Alan Belniak<br />Director of Social Media Marketing, PTC<br />
    3. 3. For Starters<br />
    4. 4. Agenda<br />Introduction <br />A bit on philosophy <br />Why is this a big deal all of the sudden? <br />OK, so I want to get involved<br />How do I start? Listen… <br />Case studies<br />“But what if…”<br />Some common objections/responses to starting this <br />Are you ready? <br />Conclusion <br />
    5. 5. Introductions<br />
    6. 6. The Who and The What, For Today<br />Who we are<br />Alan Belniak / @abelniak<br />Laura Vecchio / @laura_vecchio<br />#NEDMA-SM<br />What we’re going to cover today (the ‘what’ and the ‘how’)<br />Ask questions throughout<br />Us<br />You<br />Us<br />
    7. 7. A Bit On Philosophy<br />
    8. 8. Why You Should Engage In These Channels<br /><ul><li>25% of search results for the World’s Top 20 largest brands are links to user-generated content</li></ul> The age and face of the workforce is changing<br />
    9. 9. Why You Shouldn’t Engage In These Channels<br /> This is a magic solution<br /> You feel like you have to, so you do so, but begrudgingly and only with half the effort.<br />Human interaction is still human interaction, and what it takes to be successful with it has not changed. What has changed is the places where it happens.<br />
    10. 10. Change is Inevitable… Online Activity Evolves.<br />
    11. 11. Who is Consuming This Media?<br />
    12. 12. Your Customers Are<br />
    13. 13. source: Business.com’s 2009 B2B Social Media Benchmarking Study (http://www.business.com/info/b2b-social-media-benchmark-study)<br />
    14. 14. Why Is This A Big Deal?<br />
    15. 15. Backdrop(1 of 2)<br />
    16. 16. Backdrop(1 of 2) <br />In Summary….<br />
    17. 17. Backdrop(2 of 2)<br />
    18. 18.
    19. 19. A Double-Edged Sword<br />It’s a good thing for companies, because consumers can share their feedback about products to the company and the masses.<br />
    20. 20. A Double-Edged Sword<br />It’s a good thing for companies, because consumers can share their feedback about products to the company and the masses.<br />It’s a bad thing for companies, because consumers can share their feedback about products to the company and the masses.<br />
    21. 21. Times Have Changed<br />Old (“1.0”)<br />
    22. 22. Times Have Changed<br />Old (“1.0”)<br />New (“2.0”)<br />
    23. 23. Here’s A Scenario…<br />
    24. 24. OK, so I want to get involved…<br />
    25. 25. Current State of Affairs<br />
    26. 26. The Philosophy, In Seven Verbs<br />Do This<br />Stop<br />Listen<br />Participate<br />Contribute<br />Create<br />Engage<br />26<br />
    27. 27. The Philosophy, In Seven Verbs<br />Do This<br />Stop<br />Listen<br />Participate<br />Contribute<br />Create<br />Engage<br />Before You Do This<br />Sell<br />27<br />
    28. 28. Create a Framework to Map it Out<br />
    29. 29. How Do I start? Listen…<br />
    30. 30. Listening<br />Listening is Labor<br />Will take a modest portion of time upfront<br />Initial setup, then refinement<br />Process will become streamlined<br />Some channels may be (relatively) empty<br />Use some of the other tools discussed later on to find other channels; don’t only use what’s here<br />Balance of prescription vs. deduction vs. induction<br />
    31. 31. Listening (continued)<br />Keep in mind: Whyyou are doing this<br />Where are the conversations happening?<br />What are they talking about?<br />What form/s of media are being consumed?<br />
    32. 32. Step 1: Decide What You Want To Be About<br />Answer one very important question:<br />“Why would anyone want to be your friend?”<br />
    33. 33. Overdrive Interactive’s Core Content<br />The next few slides in the live presentation lay out Overdrive’s proven nine-step plan for content review, adjustment, propagation, and measurement.<br />They have been removed from this uploaded presentation at the request of Overdrive Interactive.<br />To learn more about what Overdrive Interactive can offer, please click here for the company overview.<br />
    34. 34. Which tools are needed?<br />
    35. 35. The plumbing and scaffolding<br />Google and Google Alerts<br />www.Google.com ; www.Google.com/alerts<br />RSS<br />What is RSS?<br />The RSS feed reader + aggregator that I use: http://reader.google.com<br />FeedMyInbox (and other such sites)<br />Transforms an RSS feed into one packaged digest version, and in e-mail form<br />Consider creating an RSS feed for each of your products, competitors, brand, etc.<br />
    36. 36. Using aggregated social search tools<br />Social Mention<br />http://socialmention.com – the site<br />Omgili<br />http://omgili.com/<br />Note the use of the slider to limit the conversation to an area<br />Any part of the graph is click-able to bring you to those conversations<br />http://omgili.com/graphs.html<br />Attractive visual display of chatter compared across topics<br />
    37. 37. Tier one searching and listening<br />Twitter Search (not just Twitter)<br />http://search.twitter.com/advanced<br />Set up to deliver an RSS feed of the mention your products, services, competitors, right to the pre-created e-mail addresses<br />Also consider http://www.monitter.com/ and http://www.twitterfall.com for a visual display of search terms<br />
    38. 38. Tier one searching and listening<br />Google’s New Tools<br />Search on something, then click ‘Show Options’<br />
    39. 39. Tier one searching and listening<br />Facebook<br />Limit searching to the top five groups (by member count)<br />LinkedIn<br />Note that with LinkedIn, there will likely not be a lot of negativity, due to the nature of the site<br />Also note that you will need to become a member of groups to see any activity; joining is usually painless<br />Limit searching to the top five groups (by member count)<br />
    40. 40. A few more examples of some of these channels in action (time permitting)<br />YouTube<br />Slideshare<br />Delicious ; Delicious Network<br />Blogs<br />Blog search engines (Technorati, Google Blog Search)<br />Blog Authoring Platforms (Wordpress, Blogger, Typepad)<br />
    41. 41. Tracking what you find<br />
    42. 42. Example of the quantification<br />
    43. 43. Make it manageable<br />It might seem overwhelming. The goal isn’t to track every single mention on the web. Instead, keep in mind the overall ‘why’…<br />Whereare the conversations happening?<br />Whatare they talking about?<br />Whatform/s of media are being consumed?<br />
    44. 44. Case studies<br />
    45. 45. To see Overdrive Interactive’s impressive portfolio of client work, click here to be taken to the site.<br />
    46. 46. Objections<br />
    47. 47. Objection Handling<br />“What if [insert name of social technology] goes away tomorrow?”<br />“This is going to take too much time.”<br />“My customers aren’t using social tools.”<br />“I tried this before, and it didn’t work.”<br />
    48. 48. Mapping the ‘Who’ to the ‘What’ and the ‘Why’<br />
    49. 49. Are you ready?<br />
    50. 50. Conclusion<br />
    51. 51. Thanks!<br />

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