Optimal Health (1)

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Optimal Health (1)

  1. 1. Nutrilite Start It Right! Workshop
  2. 2. Not Perfect Health. But Optimal Health!
  3. 3. Achieving Optimal Health  Nutrition and Supplementation.  Body.  Mind.  Choice.
  4. 4. Understanding Nutrition A balanced diet is essential to good health. Every diet should include carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins and minerals. Remember that balance, variety and moderation are key to maintaining good health.
  5. 5. Principles Of Nutrition Macronutrients  Carbohydrates, protein, fats. Micronutrients  Vitamins, minerals, antioxidants. Other Food Factors  Fibre, water, phytonutrients.
  6. 6. Macronutrients  Carbohydrates are the body’s preferred energy source.  Fats are a source of essential fatty acids and fat soluble vitamins.  Proteins are essential for growth, maintenance and repair.
  7. 7. Protein  Essential for growth and repair of worn out cells.  Formation of all structures – nails, hair, skin and internal organs.  For blood formation.  Formation of antibodies and hormones.
  8. 8. Micronutrients  Vitamins help the body perform necessary biochemical processes in cells and tissues.  Minerals activate hormones and are involved in vital enzyme systems.
  9. 9. Antioxidants  Are substances that protect the cells, the tissues and other substances from oxidative damage.  The major antioxidants are vitamin C, E and beta carotene.
  10. 10. Other Food Factors Water  Every cell in our body needs water to transport nutrients and oxygen, and remove wastes.  Water helps prevent constipation by keeping stools soft.
  11. 11. Fibre  Fiber helps to maintain a healthy digestive tract and facilitate elimination.  Sources include fruits, vegetables, wholegrains legumes and cereals.
  12. 12. Phytonutrients  Food components with nutritional value.  These compounds play a vital role in optimal health and well-being.
  13. 13. Why Supplement? - Food Choices  The type, quantity and quality of food we choose affects optimal health.  Eating healthy is a challenge.
  14. 14. Why Supplement? - Food Choices Eat Most Fruits, vegetables, legumes, breads, cereals. Eat Moderately Lean meat, fish, eggs, chicken without skin, nuts, dairy products. Eat Least Fats, oils, butter, margarine, sugar.
  15. 15. Why Supplement? - Food Habits  Convenience.  Taste.  Processing.  Transport and Storage.  cleaning and Cooking.  Cooking Losses.
  16. 16. Why Supplement? - Nutrient Robbers  Coffee and tea can reduce absorption of iron from food.  Inhibit iron absorption: One cup with a hamburger meal: – Tea - 64% – Coffee - 39% Am J Clin Nutr 1983;37:416-420
  17. 17. Why Supplement? Nutrient Robbers
  18. 18. Why Supplement? - Special Nutritional Needs Medication Stress
  19. 19. Lifestages - Childhood Common deficiency: Iron  Important for brain development  As many as one in five toddlers is iron deficient. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med, 1997;151:986
  20. 20. Lifestages - Adolescence  This is a period of rapid growth.  Iron is needed in higher levels especially during adolescence due to an increase in blood volume.  Iron is needed to replace menstrual losses in girls.
  21. 21. Lifestages - Adolescence Common deficiency: Calcium  Increased bone mass Aim for 3+ servings of calcium- rich foods: Calcium recommendation:  800-1200 mg (1-10 years)  1200-1500 mg (11-24 years)
  22. 22. Lifestages - Adult Women can lose 3% bone mass per year in the 5-7 years following menopause.
  23. 23. Lifestages - Pregnancy  Calcium  Iron  Folic Acid Supplementation reduced risk of having a baby with a neural tube defect by 40-85%. NEJM 1999;341:1485-1490
  24. 24. Lifestages - Elderly  Impaired absorption  Poor teeth condition  Interactions between medication and nutrients

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