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Radiological imaging of 
sacroiliac Joint diseases. 
Dr/ ABD ALLAH NAZEER. MD.
Introduction 
Sacroiliac joints are true synovial joints and thus subject to various forms 
of arthritis and degenerative ...
Anatomy and physiology of the sacroiliac joints: 
The sacroiliac joint is a true diarthrodial joint that joins the sacrum ...
Anatomical Variants 
Knowledge of the spectrum of sacroiliac (SI) joint variants 
broadens the understanding of the joint ...
Accessory sacroiliac joints. A and B. 63 year-old woman with bilateral 
accessory sacroiliac joints (arrows) exhibiting de...
Transitional lumbosacral vertebrae 
Transitional vertebrae are frequent developmental variants of the spine. The L5 
verte...
Other anatomical variants can be found when imaging the SI joint area. 
Although they are asymptomatic, radiologists shoul...
Bipartite iliac bony plate. 56-year-old woman. CT scan demonstrates a bipartite 
appearance of the iliac bony plate at the...
Iliosacral complex. A and B. 85-year-old female. Axial and coronal oblique CT 
images show iliac projections inserting int...
Ossification centers of the sacral wings. 24-year-old man. CT scan 
demonstrates bilateral ossification centers (arrows) o...
Paraglenoid sulci. CT scan of a 44 year-old woman displaying bilateral notches 
within the inferior ilium adjacent to the ...
Spina bifida occulta. 35 year-old woman presenting posterior midline defect of the 
neural arch at S1 and S2 levels (arrow...
Infection 
Infection of the sacrum or SI joints is a relatively rare condition. It can occur 
due to contiguous spread fro...
Pyogenic septic arthritis. CT scan of a 45-year-old man demonstrates unilateral 
subchondral bone destruction of the left ...
Pyogenic septic arthritis. In another patient, a 35 year-old male, axial T1- weighted MR image 
shows hypointense bone mar...
Tomographic cuts – Axial view, non-contrast enhanced on the bone window 
(A) and after contrast agent injection, on the so...
Plain x-ray (A), axial CT view (B), coronal MRI view, STIR (C) and axial MRI view, T1-weighted, fat-saturated 
sequence af...
Sacroiliitis is a non-infectious inflammatory process 
involving the sacroiliac joint, and is a diagnostic criterion 
for ...
According to a study by 
Bernard and Kirkaldy-Willis 
(1987), over twenty two 
percent (22%) of individuals 
who presented...
Conventional x-ray still remains as the imaging method most utilized in the 
clinical practice. An international consensus...
Findings of sacroiliitis on MRI. 
Acute phase: 
– Intra-articular fluid. 
– Subchondral bone marrow edema. 
– Articular an...
Radiographic classification in the evaluation of sacroiliac joints. Grade 0 – normal 
(A); grade I – suspicious; grade II ...
Tomographic cuts – coronal oblique plane demonstrating joint 
space narrowing at right, and preserve at left. Also, subcho...
Tomographic cuts – coronal oblique 
plane demonstrating irregularity 
and sclerosis of articular surfaces, 
predominating ...
Tomographic cuts – axial view (A) and coronal view (B) showing 
marginal, bilateral erosions and subchondral sclerosis
Tomographic cuts – coronal oblique plane demonstrating anterior marginal 
osteophytes, predominating at right, besides sub...
MRI coronal oblique views, T2- and T1- 
wieghted, fat-saturated sequences after 
contrast injection. Normal aspect – absen...
MRI coronal oblique views STIR (A) and T1-weighted fat-saturated sequences, 
before and after gadolinium injection (B,C) s...
MRI coronal oblique views T1- weighted (A) and T1-weighted fat-saturated sequences 
(B) demonstrating yellow bone marrow c...
X-ray film showing sclerosis in the ventro-caudal portions of iliac 
bones in female, asymptomatic patient, characterizing...
Tomographic cuts – axial and coronal planes. Osteoarthrosis – anterior osteophytes 
with mild subchondral sclerosis. Also,...
Degenerative joint disease 
Osteoarthritis is a common disorder of the SI joint. It is seen in most people 
over 40 years ...
Degenerative joint disease. Oblique radiograph of the right sacroiliac joint in 
a 39 year-old woman. Small marginal osteo...
Degenerative joint disease. CT scans of different patients, exhibiting large bridging 
(arrowheads) and small marginal ost...
Trauma and stress related conditions: 
Acute fractures. 
Fractures of the SI area due to significant trauma may pose 
diag...
Diastasis of the sacroiliac joints (open book pelvic injury). Radiograph and axial 
CT scan in a 47-year-old man after maj...
Bilateral sacral insufficiency fractures. 88 year-old osteoporotic woman with a left 
hip replacement. CT scan of the pelv...
Stress fracture of the sacrum. 61-year-old woman with spinal arthrodesis. CT scan 
reveals coronally oriented linear incre...
Bilateral sacral insufficiency fractures. 59 year-old woman. CT scan 
of the sacrum shows vertical fractures through the l...
Neoplasia 
A variety of benign and malignant bone tumours, primary 
and secondary, may involve the SI and sacrococcygeal a...
Sacral tumours, both primary and secondary, are rare 
lesions. They often escape early diagnosis. 
Most patients with sacr...
Enostosis (bone island). 37-year-old female. Solitary, oblong, osteosclerotic 
lesion in the right ilium (arrow). It is us...
Skeletal metastasis: osteolytic pattern. CT scan of a 50-year-old woman exhibits 
striking osteolysis of the sacrum (aster...
Skeletal metastasis: osteosclerotic pattern. In this 50-year-old female 
patient with advanced breast carcinoma, osteoblas...
Plasmacytoma. In this 70 year-old male, axial CT and T1-weighted MR images 
show a large destructive lytic lesion of the r...
Sacro-iliac involvement in Hodgkin disease. In this 33 year-old male with 
known Hodgkin disease, CT scan shows heterogene...
Chordoma. Axial and coronal CT scan images of a 39 year-old man with a large 
well-circumscribed sacral mass (asterisk), c...
Osteoid osteoma. CT scan oblique coronal reconstruction. A subarticular iliac 
nidus with central calcification (arrow) an...
Sacral neurofibromas. 32-year-old woman with type I neurofibromatosis. Axial 
CT scan shows multiple expansile neural fora...
Miscellaneous 
Intraosseous pneumatocyst: 
Intraosseous pneumatocyst is a benign condition, commonly seen in iliac bone or...
Meningeal Cyst: 
Sacral meningeal cysts (also known as perineural cysts, Tarlov cysts and sacral 
arachnoid cysts) are a c...
Osteitis condensans ilii (OCI) typically causes well-defined subchondral triangular 
sclerosis on the anteroinferior aspec...
Osteitis condensans ilii. A) In a young female patient, bilateral triangular well defined 
sclerosis is present in the ili...
Paget's disease of the bone (also known as osteitis deformans) is a chronic 
metabolic bone disorder characterized by exce...
Paget disease with secondary osteosarcoma. 53-year-old male patient with 
excruciating right sided lumbosacral and radicul...
DISH or Forester disease is a common disorder characterized by bone proliferation at 
sites of tendinous and ligamentous i...
Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). Axial CT scan shows bridging 
ossifications (arrows) at anterior aspect o...
Osteopoikilosis and osteopetrosis are two examples of osteosclerotic 
dysplasias that may be found when imaging the SI joi...
Paget's disease of the bone (also known as osteitis deformans) is a chronic metabolic 
bone disorder characterized by exce...
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Presentation1.pptx, radiological imaging of sacroiliac joint diseases.

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Presentation1.pptx, radiological imaging of sacroiliac joint diseases.

  1. 1. Radiological imaging of sacroiliac Joint diseases. Dr/ ABD ALLAH NAZEER. MD.
  2. 2. Introduction Sacroiliac joints are true synovial joints and thus subject to various forms of arthritis and degenerative processes. Although they are relatively immobile – the joint can only rotate 3–5° in the younger subject – they may be susceptible to mechanical trauma. After the fifth decade of life, fibrosis takes place between the cartilage surfaces and by the seventh decade the joint has usually undergone fibrous ankylosis. The available range of movement decreases as fibrous ankylosis increases. Most pain in the sacroiliac or gluteal region does not originate from the sacroiliac joint but is referred pain of discodural origin; every diagnosis of a ‘sacroiliac lesion’ should be made with caution and only after other common sources of ‘sacroiliac pain’ have been ruled out. The pathological conditions affecting the sacroiliac joint are inflammatory and mechanical. The latter is usually referred to as ‘sacroiliac joint syndrome’. The exact nature of the syndrome is not known but it is generally accepted that mechanical pain stems from minor subluxations and/or ligamentous strain.
  3. 3. Anatomy and physiology of the sacroiliac joints: The sacroiliac joint is a true diarthrodial joint that joins the sacrum to the pelvis. The sacrum (tailbone) connects on the right and left sides of the ilia (pelvic bones) to form the sacroiliac joints. The pelvic girdle is made up of two innominate bones (the iliac bones) and the sacrum. The innominate bones join in the front of the pelvis to form the pubic symphysis, and at back of the sacrum to form the sacroiliac (SI) joints. Each innominate bone (ilium) joins the femur (thigh bone) to form the hip joint; thus the sacroiliac joint moves with walking and movement of the torso. In this joint, hyaline cartilage on the sacral side moves against fibrocartilage on the iliac side. The sacroiliac joint contains numerous ridges and depressions that function in stability. Studies have documented that motion does occur at the joint; therefore, slightly subluxed and even locked positions can occur. Muscles and ligaments surround and attach to the SI joint in the front and back, primarily on the ilial or sacral surfaces. These can all be a source of pain and inflammation if the SI joint is dysfunctional. The sacroiliac joint is highly dependent on its strong ligamentous structure for support and stability. The most commonly disrupted and/or torn ligaments are the iliolumbar ligament and the posterior sacroiliac ligament. The ligamentous structures offer resistance to shear and loading. The deep anterior, posterior, and interosseous ligaments resist the load of the sacrum relative to the ilium. More superficial ligaments (e.g., the sacrotuberous ligament) react to dynamic motions (such as straight-leg raising during physical motion). The long dorsal sacroiliac ligament can become stretched in periods of reduced lumbar lordosis (e.g., during pregnancy).
  4. 4. Anatomical Variants Knowledge of the spectrum of sacroiliac (SI) joint variants broadens the understanding of the joint anatomy and facilitates image interpretation. Accessory SI joints Accessory SI joints occur in 10-30% of the population. Their etiology remains unclear, as it is not certain if the ASIJ is a congenital condition or an acquired joint . They are usually located at the postero-superior portion of the SI joints and are often affected by degenerative changes, with findings of reduced joint space, sclerosis, osteophytes and Ankylosis. These changes may manifest with symptoms of low back pain and may mimic focal sacroiliitis on imaging.
  5. 5. Accessory sacroiliac joints. A and B. 63 year-old woman with bilateral accessory sacroiliac joints (arrows) exhibiting degenerative changes (sclerosis and small osteophytes). C. In another patient with accessory sacroiliac joints, an ankylosed accessory joint is seen on the left (thin arrow). Insufficiency fractures are present anteriorly at the sacral wings (arrowheads).
  6. 6. Transitional lumbosacral vertebrae Transitional vertebrae are frequent developmental variants of the spine. The L5 vertebra can be incorporated into the sacrum (ie, "sacralized"), or the S1 vertebra can be incorporated into the lumbar spine (ie, "lumbarized") Transitional lumbosacral vertebra. 49 year-old female with right sided low back pain. CT demonstrates degeneration of an anomalous articulation between the right L5 transverse process and the sacral ala (arrow), with sclerosis, osteophytosis and vacuum phenomenon.
  7. 7. Other anatomical variants can be found when imaging the SI joint area. Although they are asymptomatic, radiologists should recognize them as to avoid misinterpretation as pathologic findings. Iliosacral complex (formed by an iliac projection inserting to a complementary sacral recess, usually at the posterosuperior part of the SI joint), bipartite appearance of the iliac bony plate (located at the posteroinferior portion of the joint) ossification centers of the sacral wings (presenting as triangular osseous bodies within the joint space with posterosuperior location) and paraglenoid sulci (bilateral grooves in inferior ilium just lateral to the SI joints, seen almost exclusively in women, representing focal zones of bone resorption occurring in response to increased stress at the site of attachment of the inferior SI ligament) are some of these variants. In infants, the posterior neural arches are separated by a cartilaginous cleft, seen as a narrow vertical lucent line on frontal radiographs. This cleft disappears through ossification by 3-5 years of age. A persisting cleft is an extremely common developmental anomaly most frequently seen at S1 (but may be also present at other levels). It is filled with cartilage and fibrous tissue, and, when isolated, is usually of no clinical significance and is called spina bifida occulta .
  8. 8. Bipartite iliac bony plate. 56-year-old woman. CT scan demonstrates a bipartite appearance of the iliac bony plate at the inferoposterior portion of the joints (arrows).
  9. 9. Iliosacral complex. A and B. 85-year-old female. Axial and coronal oblique CT images show iliac projections inserting into complementary sacral recesses bilaterally, at the superoposterior portion of the sacroiliac joints (arrows). C. In another patient, a 37- year-old female, a unilateral iliosacral complex is evident on the right (arrow).
  10. 10. Ossification centers of the sacral wings. 24-year-old man. CT scan demonstrates bilateral ossification centers (arrows) of the sacral wings at the anterosuperior portion of the sacroiliac joints.
  11. 11. Paraglenoid sulci. CT scan of a 44 year-old woman displaying bilateral notches within the inferior ilium adjacent to the sacroiliac joints, termed paraglenoid sulci (arrows). These grooves represent a normal variant found almost exclusively in women.
  12. 12. Spina bifida occulta. 35 year-old woman presenting posterior midline defect of the neural arch at S1 and S2 levels (arrows). Bilateral well-defined subchondral sclerosis is present in the anterior portions of the sacroiliac joints (asterisks), more prominent on the iliac side, probably representing osteitis condensans ilii.
  13. 13. Infection Infection of the sacrum or SI joints is a relatively rare condition. It can occur due to contiguous spread from adjacent infection, hematogenous spread from the skin, intestines or respiratory or genitourinary tract or from intravenous injections in drug abusers. Also, traumatic injuries to the sacrum and osseous pelvis or iatrogenic injury from gluteal injections, sacral biopsy and SI joint injections can be the cause of infectious sacroiliitis . Septic arthritis results in unilateral SI joint widening and destruction that may eventually lead to osseous ankylosis. Bone sequestration may occur. It is important to be aware that conventional radiographs are usually normal during the first 2-3 weeks. CT and particularly MR can demonstrate earlier and accurately the extent of bone and soft tissue involvement. Septic arthritis of the SI joints can be confounded with sacroiliitis of inflammatory arthropaties. Synovitis, bone marrow edema and erosions are common in both entities,but septic sacroiliitis is usually unilateral, involve equally both the ilium and sacrum, and inflammatory changes tend to extend to periarticular soft-tissues. Periarticular abscess formation is indicative of septic etiology.
  14. 14. Pyogenic septic arthritis. CT scan of a 45-year-old man demonstrates unilateral subchondral bone destruction of the left sacroiliac joint (arrows), with joint-space widening, sequestra (arrowheads) and soft tissue abscess extending anteriorly (asterisk). A few weeks before this patient had a Staphylococcus aureus septicemia, which was presumed to be the agent responsible for this infectious sacroiliitis.
  15. 15. Pyogenic septic arthritis. In another patient, a 35 year-old male, axial T1- weighted MR image shows hypointense bone marrow adjacent to the right sacroiliac joint (asterisks). Coronal and axial T2-weighted image with fat supression shows high signal intensity within the widened and irregular joint space, representing synovitis or joint effusion, and marrow edema on each side of the sacroiliac joint (arrows). Edematous changes are also seen within the right piriformis muscle (arrowhead). Fluid collections are seen beneath the right iliacus and gluteus medius muscles (curved arrows). CT guided aspiration of the right sacroiliac joint was performed.
  16. 16. Tomographic cuts – Axial view, non-contrast enhanced on the bone window (A) and after contrast agent injection, on the soft tissue window (B,C). Infectious sacroiliitis – unilateral lesion characterized by accentuated irregularity and sclerosis of articular surfaces, besides periarticular abscess.
  17. 17. Plain x-ray (A), axial CT view (B), coronal MRI view, STIR (C) and axial MRI view, T1-weighted, fat-saturated sequence after contrast injection (D). Right infectious sacroiliitis – accentuated irregularity of articular surfaces, joint space widening, intense subchondral edema (hypersignal on STIR) and accentuated contrast-enhancement including adjacent soft tissues. Signs of traumatic at left.
  18. 18. Sacroiliitis is a non-infectious inflammatory process involving the sacroiliac joint, and is a diagnostic criterion for seronegative spondyloarthropathies. Imaging methods are of great value for confirming the diagnosis of this condition. The present study is a review of cases included in didactic files and in the literature to illustrate the anatomy, techniques, and main imaging findings in x-ray, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging for determining the diagnosis of sacroiliitis, also approaching main differential diagnoses. Keywords: Sacroiliitis; Spondyloarthropathy; X-ray; Computed tomography; Magnetic resonance imaging
  19. 19. According to a study by Bernard and Kirkaldy-Willis (1987), over twenty two percent (22%) of individuals who presented with lower back complaints actually had problems in their sacroiliac (SI) joint. There may be up to a million patients annually with low back complaints that have SI joint conditions like sacroiliac joint disruptions and degenerative sacroiliitis.
  20. 20. Conventional x-ray still remains as the imaging method most utilized in the clinical practice. An international consensus still remains to be reached regarding the best technique and view for radiographic evaluation of the sacroiliac joint. Anteroposterior views with 25–30º caudal angulation of the x-ray tube, and oblique views are the most utilized in our practice, in an attempt to minimize structures overlapping, so facilitating the study interpretation. Scintigraphy presents high sensitivity for sacroiliitis, but specificity is low. This study must be interpreted in combination with other radiological study, and is of higher value in cases of unilateral alterations. The most significant indication would be for localizing another disease as a cause of lumbar pain The evaluation of sacroiliitis by CT, in comparison with the conventional x-ray, has shown to be more sensitive, with a better and earlier detection of bone alterations, principally because of its capability to perform sequential slices, so avoiding structures overlapping The CT shows higher sensitivity for detecting minimal bone erosions and joint space narrowing, however presents the same diagnostic capacity of plain x-rays. The most frequent findings of sacroiliitis on CT are: joint space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, bone erosions and ankylosis. Joint space narrowing is characterized by a thickness of less than 2.0 mm in synovial tissues . Subchondral sclerosis is found in the presence of an asymmetrical or focal area with increased density (> 5.0 mm on the iliac side, and > 3.0 mm on the sacral side).
  21. 21. Findings of sacroiliitis on MRI. Acute phase: – Intra-articular fluid. – Subchondral bone marrow edema. – Articular and periarticular post-gadolinium Enhancement. – Soft tissues edema. Chronic phase: – Periarticular bone marrow reconversion. – Replacement of articular cartilage by pannus. – Bone erosion. – Subchondral sclerosis. – Joint space widening or narrowing. – Ankylosis.
  22. 22. Radiographic classification in the evaluation of sacroiliac joints. Grade 0 – normal (A); grade I – suspicious; grade II – mild irregularity and sclerosis of articular surfaces, with preserved joint space (B); grade III – joint space narrowing, besides intense irregularity and subchondral sclerosis (C); grade IV – bilateral ankylosis (D).
  23. 23. Tomographic cuts – coronal oblique plane demonstrating joint space narrowing at right, and preserve at left. Also, subchondral sclerosis is observed at right, more evident in the iliac portion.
  24. 24. Tomographic cuts – coronal oblique plane demonstrating irregularity and sclerosis of articular surfaces, predominating in the iliac bone. Tomographic cuts – coronal oblique plane demonstrating bilateral, partial fusion.
  25. 25. Tomographic cuts – axial view (A) and coronal view (B) showing marginal, bilateral erosions and subchondral sclerosis
  26. 26. Tomographic cuts – coronal oblique plane demonstrating anterior marginal osteophytes, predominating at right, besides subchondral sclerosis at left.
  27. 27. MRI coronal oblique views, T2- and T1- wieghted, fat-saturated sequences after contrast injection. Normal aspect – absence of paramagnetic contrast enhancement MRI coronal oblique views, STIR sequence showing intense bilateral subchondral edema (hypersignal).
  28. 28. MRI coronal oblique views STIR (A) and T1-weighted fat-saturated sequences, before and after gadolinium injection (B,C) showing intense subchondral edema (hypersignal on STIR), as well as accentuated contrast enhancement. Also, joint space narrowing, contours irregularities and marginal erosions are observed.
  29. 29. MRI coronal oblique views T1- weighted (A) and T1-weighted fat-saturated sequences (B) demonstrating yellow bone marrow collection (fat) in subchondral bone, more evident at left (hypersignal on T1), with signal loss in the fat-saturated sequence.
  30. 30. X-ray film showing sclerosis in the ventro-caudal portions of iliac bones in female, asymptomatic patient, characterizing condensing iliac osteitis. Note that joint spaces are normal.
  31. 31. Tomographic cuts – axial and coronal planes. Osteoarthrosis – anterior osteophytes with mild subchondral sclerosis. Also, note bilateral vacuum phenomenon.
  32. 32. Degenerative joint disease Osteoarthritis is a common disorder of the SI joint. It is seen in most people over 40 years of age and is frequently associated with pain and stiffness. Imaging findings, which may be unilateral or bilateral, include focal or diffuse joint space narrowing, particularly at the inferior aspect of the joint, well-defined subchondral sclerosis mainly involving the ilium, and anterior osteophytes, which may fuse anteriorly giving rise to periarticular ankylosis. Although fibrous ankylosis within the joint is typical of advanced osteoarthritis, intra-articular osseous ankylosis is not a feature of osteoarthritis, as opposed to ankylosing spondylitis. Subchondral erosions and cysts, a prominent feature of ankylosing spondylitis, are not common in SI joint osteoarthritis, and, when present, are small and shallow. A nonspecific sign of osteoarthritis, also present in other disorders, is intra-articular vacuum phenomenon, and some of these patients may have an adjacent subchondral Pneumatocyst . Osteoarthritis of the SI joints may present occasionally mild bone marrow edema, subchondral sclerosis, or joint effusion on MR that mimic the imaging appearance of sacroiliitis. In contrast to sacroiliitis, in SI osteoarthritis, sclerotic changes are confined to the subchondral bone and does not extend at more than 5 mm from the SI joint space.
  33. 33. Degenerative joint disease. Oblique radiograph of the right sacroiliac joint in a 39 year-old woman. Small marginal osteophytes (arrow), subchondral sclerosis (asterisk) and vacuum phenomenon are observed.
  34. 34. Degenerative joint disease. CT scans of different patients, exhibiting large bridging (arrowheads) and small marginal osteophytes (arrow), subchondral sclerosis (asterisk), irregular joint space narrowing, pneumatocyst (thin arrow) and vacuum phenomenon.
  35. 35. Trauma and stress related conditions: Acute fractures. Fractures of the SI area due to significant trauma may pose diagnostic challenges to the radiologist when cross sectional imaging techniques are not used. Plain radiographs of the sacrum are particularly difficult to interpret in the setting of trauma owing to the overlying soft tissues. Also, the concurrent occurrence of other pelvic fractures may draw the attention of radiologists and trauma physicians away from the sacrum. CT is the examination of choice for imaging suspected sacral fractures and dislocations. The joint may be widened due to an ''open book'' injury , or there may be vertical displacement of the ilium relative to the sacrum after a vertical shear injury. Sacral or iliac fractures may also extend into the SI joint. Insufficiency stress fractures. Sacral insufficiency fractures arise from the application of normal loads on a bone that is mineral deficient or abnormally inelastic.
  36. 36. Diastasis of the sacroiliac joints (open book pelvic injury). Radiograph and axial CT scan in a 47-year-old man after major trauma show widening of the anterior aspect of the sacroiliac joints (arrows), as the posterior sacroiliac ligaments remain intact. Note also the associated pubic symphysis diastasis (arrowhead), an injury frequently associated with sacroiliac joint diastasis.
  37. 37. Bilateral sacral insufficiency fractures. 88 year-old osteoporotic woman with a left hip replacement. CT scan of the pelvis shows sacral fractures with vertical and horizontal components (arrows), exhibiting extensive surrounding sclerosis. Note the associated, aggressive looking, lytic left parasymphyseal fracture (thin arrow). Hip prosthesis may be a factor contributing stress. Incidental chondrocalcinosis is noted in the sacroiliac joints and the right hip (arrowheads).
  38. 38. Stress fracture of the sacrum. 61-year-old woman with spinal arthrodesis. CT scan reveals coronally oriented linear increased density area on the left sacral wing (arrows). Arthrodesis-related abnormal distribution of stresses may be a contributing factor.
  39. 39. Bilateral sacral insufficiency fractures. 59 year-old woman. CT scan of the sacrum shows vertical fractures through the lateral masses (arrowheads), disrupting the cortex.
  40. 40. Neoplasia A variety of benign and malignant bone tumours, primary and secondary, may involve the SI and sacrococcygeal area. The most frequent benign tumours include teratoma, Enostosis , giant cell tumor, aneurysmal bone cyst, osteoblastoma and hemangioma. Malignant neoplasms include metastasis , multiple myeloma, lymphoma , chordoma , chondrosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor and osteosarcoma. Metastatic lesions of the sacrum are far more common than primary malignancy Osteoid osteomas only rarely involve the SI joint area. Sacral canal and foraminal tumours, such as nerve sheath tumours , ependymomas and drop metastasis, may occasionally occur.
  41. 41. Sacral tumours, both primary and secondary, are rare lesions. They often escape early diagnosis. Most patients with sacral tumours have a non-specific complaint of low back pain. However, the history will reveal some unusual features typical of non-mechanical lesions in the lumbar spine, currently referred to as ‘warning symptoms’ • Continuous pain, not altered by changing positions or activities • Increasing pain, slowly getting worse • Expanding pain • Bilateral sciatica. Late in the course of a serious sacral lesion, disturbance of urinary and/or bowel control may occur.
  42. 42. Enostosis (bone island). 37-year-old female. Solitary, oblong, osteosclerotic lesion in the right ilium (arrow). It is usually a solitary, discrete focus of osteosclerosis within the spongiosa of bone. It may be round, ovoid, or oblong. It often has a brush border composed of radiating osseous spicules that intermingle with the surrounding trabeculae of the spongiosa.
  43. 43. Skeletal metastasis: osteolytic pattern. CT scan of a 50-year-old woman exhibits striking osteolysis of the sacrum (asterisk), crossing the sacroiliac joint to involve the ilium. Histology proved it to be skeletal metastasis of renal cell carcinoma.
  44. 44. Skeletal metastasis: osteosclerotic pattern. In this 50-year-old female patient with advanced breast carcinoma, osteoblastic skeletal metastasis are evident in the left sacrum and ilium and right femur (asterisks).
  45. 45. Plasmacytoma. In this 70 year-old male, axial CT and T1-weighted MR images show a large destructive lytic lesion of the right ilium (asterisks), extending to the iliac surface of the sacroiliac joint.
  46. 46. Sacro-iliac involvement in Hodgkin disease. In this 33 year-old male with known Hodgkin disease, CT scan shows heterogeneous left iliac and inferior sacral bone sclerosis (white asterisks). On MR, low signal on T1 and high signal on T2 fat saturated with enhancement after gadolinium administration are evident in these same regions (yellow asterisks), findings compatible with lymphomatous marrow replacement. Foraminal periradicular infiltration at and below S2 is also apparent (arrowheads).
  47. 47. Chordoma. Axial and coronal CT scan images of a 39 year-old man with a large well-circumscribed sacral mass (asterisk), centrally located, predominantly osteolytic, with irregular calcifications within its matrix. Chordoma is the most common primary malignant sacral tumour and approximately 50% of all chordomas are sacrococcygeal in location.
  48. 48. Osteoid osteoma. CT scan oblique coronal reconstruction. A subarticular iliac nidus with central calcification (arrow) and mild surrounding sclerosis is identified in the right iliac bone.
  49. 49. Sacral neurofibromas. 32-year-old woman with type I neurofibromatosis. Axial CT scan shows multiple expansile neural foraminal and sacral canal masses (asterisks), with associated remodelling (arrows) and erosion (arrowheads) of bone.
  50. 50. Miscellaneous Intraosseous pneumatocyst: Intraosseous pneumatocyst is a benign condition, commonly seen in iliac bone or sacrum. In the ilium they are more common in males and may or may not be associated with SI joint degenerative disease . Juxta-articular subchondral gas-filled lesions have also been reported in the sacrum in patients with osteoarthritis of the SI joint Intraosseous Pneumatocysts. A. In a 40 year-old man a subarticular iliac cyst (arrow) with sclerotic margins, containing gas, is identified. B. In another patient,
  51. 51. Meningeal Cyst: Sacral meningeal cysts (also known as perineural cysts, Tarlov cysts and sacral arachnoid cysts) are a common incidental finding on pelvic cross sectional imaging performed for unrelated reasons. These developmental lesions are abnormal dilatations of the meninges within the sacral canal or foramina, which may or may not communicate with the subarachnoid space. Tarlov Cysts. 49 year-old woman with symptoms of low back pain. T1 and T2- weighted sagittal images show incidental sacral meningeal (Tarlov) cysts (arrows).
  52. 52. Osteitis condensans ilii (OCI) typically causes well-defined subchondral triangular sclerosis on the anteroinferior aspect of the iliac side of the SI joints. Most frequently it is a bilateral and relatively symmetric process, but occasionally occurs unilaterally. Osteitis condensans ilii. In this young female patient unilateral triangular sclerosis is evident in the right ilium (asterisk). Also noted are bilateral para-glenoid sulci (arrows).
  53. 53. Osteitis condensans ilii. A) In a young female patient, bilateral triangular well defined sclerosis is present in the iliac bones (asterisks). B) In another patient, a 29 year old female, CT scan shows triangular sclerotic areas adjacent to the inferior portions of the sacroiliac joints (asterisks), more prominent on the iliac bones and on the right side. The joint spaces are maintained and the joint margins are sharply defined. Also noted are bilateral para-glenoid sulci (arrowheads).
  54. 54. Paget's disease of the bone (also known as osteitis deformans) is a chronic metabolic bone disorder characterized by excessive abnormal bone remodeling, with an increase in osteoclast-mediated bone resorption and compensatory excessive osteoblast activation Paget disease with secondary osteosarcoma. 53-year-old male patient with excruciating right sided lumbosacral and radicular pain. CT scan shows diffuse sclerosis of the vertebrae, sacrum and ilium with accentuation of trabeculae, cortical thickening and poorly defined bone expansion. Lytic bone destruction with adjacent osteoid-like calcifications is apparent in the right sacral ala (arrows).
  55. 55. Paget disease with secondary osteosarcoma. 53-year-old male patient with excruciating right sided lumbosacral and radicular pain. T1-weighted, T2-weighted with fat suppression and T1-weighted fat supressed gadolinium enhanced MR images show a large destructive heterogeneous lesion centered at the right sacral lateral mass with soft tissue (arrowheads), right sacral foramina (small arrows) and sacral canal (curved arrow) extension. Right sided L5 to S3 nerve roots are compromised.
  56. 56. DISH or Forester disease is a common disorder characterized by bone proliferation at sites of tendinous and ligamentous insertion. The incidence of DISH has been reported to be seven in every 100 men and four in every 100 women older than 30 years. Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). Bridging ossification (arrowheads) is seen at the anterior and superior aspects of the sacroiliac joints in this CT scan of a 80-year-old male patient with dorsal and lumbar spine DISH. The sacroiliac joints are otherwise unremarkable.
  57. 57. Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). Axial CT scan shows bridging ossifications (arrows) at anterior aspect of sacroiliac joints in a 60-year-old man with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Proximal intraarticular fusion is also evident (arrowheads), while the inferior (synovial) portion of the SI joints (not shown) is preserved.
  58. 58. Osteopoikilosis and osteopetrosis are two examples of osteosclerotic dysplasias that may be found when imaging the SI joint region. Osteopoikilosis. Sacroiliac joint radiograph in a 43 year-old asymptomatic woman, exhibiting multiple circular and ovoid milimetric foci of osteosclerosis, resembling bone islands, distributed symmetrically in a periarticular pattern about the sacroiliac joints.
  59. 59. Paget's disease of the bone (also known as osteitis deformans) is a chronic metabolic bone disorder characterized by excessive abnormal bone remodeling, with an increase in osteoclast-mediated bone resorption and compensatory excessive osteoblast activation Osteopetrosis. Radiograph of the pelvis in a 70 year-old man. There is diffuse increased radiodensity of the pelvic bones and a pathologic fracture of the left femoral neck.
  60. 60. Thank You.

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