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American Bar Association ICC Project Topline April 2018

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American Bar Association ICC Project Topline April 2018

  1. 1. 1 American Bar Association April 2018 1
  2. 2. METHODOLOGY AND TECHNICAL DETAILS This is the eighth wave of research for an ongoing Ipsos survey:  Current fieldwork period: April 4-6, 2018  The previous waves were conducted February 21-24, 2014; December 2-6, 2014; April 2-6, 2015; November 16-18, 2015; April 22-25, 2016; July 11-12, 2016; and July 12-14, 2017.  The current survey interviewed a national sample of 1,004 adults  The previous waves included 1,005 adults, 1,004 adults, 1,005 adults, 1,003 adults, 1,006 adults, 1,087 adults, 1,017 adults respectively.  These slides also contain some data filtered on just those respondents reporting that they know ‘A great deal’, ‘A fair amount’, or ‘ A little bit’ about the ICC at Q1 (cutting out those who say they know ‘Nothing at all’). This reduced the filtered base size to 489, and is referred to in the data as ‘Aware of ICC’ audience. ─ The first wave included 379 of these respondents ─ The second wave included 338 of these respondents ─ The third wave included 408 of these respondents ─ The fourth wave included 349 of these respondents ─ The fifth wave included 372 of these respondents ─ The sixth wave included 528 of these respondents ─ The seventh wave included 506 of these respondents  Weighting then employed to balance demographics and ensure that the sample's composition reflects that of the U.S. adult population according to Census data and to provide results intended to approximate the sample universe.  Statistical margins of error are not applicable to online polls because they are based on samples drawn from opt-in online panels, not on random samples that mirror the population within a statistical probability ratio.  All sample surveys and polls may be subject to other sources of error, including, but not limited to coverage error, and measurement error. 2
  3. 3. 1.How much, if anything, would you say you know about the International Criminal Court? 8% 9% 28% 55% A great deal A fair amount A little bit Nothing at all Base: All Respondents (n=1,004) Knowledge of International Criminal Court 3
  4. 4. 1.How much, if anything, would you say you know about the International Criminal Court? Knowledge of International Criminal Court - Trend 55%54%55% 61%63%59%64%60% 28%29%26% 24%21%30%21%28% 9%10%9% 7%8% 9% 8% 8% 8%8%10%8%7% 2%7%4% April 2018July 2017July 2016April 2016November 2015 April 2015December 2014 February 2014 Nothing at all A little bit A fair amount A great deal 4 Base: All Respondents (n=1,004)
  5. 5. Attitudes towards U.S. Participation in ICC 38% 62% 73% 81% 24% 35% 63% 75% 18% 24% 7% 13% 8% 12% 46% 49% 13% 14% 54% 59% 55% 25% 18% 7% 31% 17% 25% 12% 29% 16% Agree Disagree Don't know The United States is currently a member of the International Criminal Court It is important for the United States to participate in international organizations that support human rights and that hold individuals accountable for mass atrocities Joining international organizations concerned with human rights and holding individuals accountable for mass atrocities is a risk to the US because it could hurt our autonomy We should dedicate US resources (financial, military, intelligence, etc) to international organizations that support human rights and that hold individuals accountable for mass atrocities It is not in our best interests to dedicate US resources (financial, military, intelligence, etc.) to supporting international organizations that support human rights and that hold individuals accountable for mass atrocities All Adults Aware of ICC All Adults Aware of ICC All Adults Aware of ICC All Adults Aware of ICC All Adults Aware of ICC 5 Base: All Respondents (n=1,004); All at least aware of ICC (n=489) 2. Please indicate whether you agree or disagree with each of the statements (Agree Only)
  6. 6. 2. Please indicate whether you agree or disagree with each of the statements (Agree Only) Attitudes towards U.S. Participation in ICC - Trend 28 35 31 29 33 35 38 38 60 60 64 60 68 64 70 73 24 23 20 24 26 28 25 24 47 48 53 52 57 55 62 63 21 20 20 20 20 22 21 18 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Feb-14 Mar-14 Apr-14 May-14 Jun-14 Jul-14 Aug-14 Sep-14 Oct-14 Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15 Feb-15 Mar-15 Apr-15 May-15 Jun-15 Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 Sep-16 Oct-16 Nov-16 Dec-16 Jan-17 Feb-17 Mar-17 Apr-17 May-17 Jun-17 Jul-17 Aug-17 Sep-17 Oct-17 Nov-17 Dec-17 Jan-18 Feb-18 Mar-18 Apr-18 The United States is currently a member of the International Criminal Court It is important for the United States to participate in international organizations that support human rights and that hold individuals accountable for mass atrocities Joining international organizations concerned with human rights and holding individuals accountable for mass atrocities is a risk to the US because it could hurt our autonomy We should dedicate US resources (financial, military, intelligence, etc) to international organizations that support human rights and that hold individuals It is not in our best interests to dedicate US resources (financial, military, intelligence, etc) to supporting international organizations that support human rights and that hold individuals accountable for mass atrocities % AGREE 6 Base: All Respondents (n=1,004)
  7. 7. Joining the International Criminal Court 3. The International Criminal Court (ICC)is the world’s only permanent international tribunal created by a treaty for the purpose of investigating and prosecuting war crimes, genocide, and crimes against humanity (mass atrocities). Currently, 123 countries are members of the International Criminal Court. The United States formally announced in 2002 that it would not become a member of the International Criminal Court for a multitude of reasons, including questions about the court’s jurisdiction and structure. Some people believe that the US should become more involved in or fully join the ICC so that we can use our considerable power, influence, and resources to support the important efforts of the Court to pursue individuals who have committed mass atrocities (when the perpetrator’s own country’s courts have failed to do so) Some people believe that the US should not join the ICC because it compromises our sovereignty as a nation, and because our standing in the world means our military personnel and civilian officials might be prosecuted via the ICC for political reasons Which of these statements comes closer to your personal opinion? 50% 20% 29% 67% 18% 16% The US should become more involved in or fully join the ICC The US should not join the ICC Don't know All Aware of ICC 7 Base: All Respondents (n=1,004); All at least aware of ICC (n=489)
  8. 8. Joining the International Criminal Court - Trend 34 37 37 37 44 44 50 50 24 25 23 19 21 21 21 20 42 38 40 45 35 35 29 29 10 20 30 40 50 60 The US should become more involved in or fully join the ICC The US should not join the ICC Don't know 8 Base: All Respondents (n=1,004) 3. The International Criminal Court (ICC)is the world’s only permanent international tribunal created by a treaty for the purpose of investigating and prosecuting war crimes, genocide, and crimes against humanity (mass atrocities). Currently, 123 countries are members of the International Criminal Court. The United States formally announced in 2002 that it would not become a member of the International Criminal Court for a multitude of reasons, including questions about the court’s jurisdiction and structure. Some people believe that the US should become more involved in or fully join the ICC so that we can use our considerable power, influence, and resources to support the important efforts of the Court to pursue individuals who have committed mass atrocities (when the perpetrator’s own country’s courts have failed to do so) Some people believe that the US should not join the ICC because it compromises our sovereignty as a nation, and because our standing in the world means our military personnel and civilian officials might be prosecuted via the ICC for political reasons Which of these statements comes closer to your personal opinion?
  9. 9. The US should continue to dedicate moderate resources to supporting some actions of the ICC without formally joining, such as by providing satellite photos if our satellites are passing an area of interest to the ICC Joining the ICC would compromise America's sovereignty as a nation The US should become more engaged and involved in the ICC without becoming a member by making all forms of our vast governmental resources available to support the work of the ICC The US should become a full member of the International Criminal Court and robustly support all of its work. 4. For each of the statements below, please indicate whether you agree or disagree with the statement. Attitudes towards U.S. Participation in ICC 54% 62% 28% 37% 41% 50% 36% 54% 21% 27% 38% 46% 30% 34% 28% 29% 24% 11% 34% 17% 29% 17% 36% 17% Agree Disagree Don't know 9 Base: All Respondents (n=1,004); All at least aware of ICC (n=489) All Adults Aware of ICC All Adults Aware of ICC All Adults Aware of ICC All Adults Aware of ICC
  10. 10. The US should continue to dedicate moderate resources to supporting some actions of the ICC without formally joining, such as by providing satellite photos if our satellites are passing an area of interest to the ICC Joining the ICC would compromise America's sovereignty as a nation The US should become more engaged and involved in the ICC without becoming a member by making all forms of our vast governmental resources available to support the work of the ICC The US should become a full member of the International Criminal Court and robustly support all of its work. Attitudes towards U.S. Participation in ICC - Trend 44% 47% 43% 42% 52% 49% 53% 54% 0% 50% 100% 26% 28% 26% 24% 31% 32% 30% 28% 0% 20% 40% 28% 31% 32% 33% 37% 37% 39% 41% 0% 50% 22% 25% 24% 27% 32% 32% 36% 36% 0% 20% 40% Feb-14 Apr-14 Jun-14 Aug-14 Oct-14 Dec-14 Feb-15 Apr-15 Jun-15 Aug-15 Oct-15 Dec-15 Feb-16 Apr-16 Jun-16 Aug-16 Oct-16 Dec-16 Feb-17 Apr-17 Jun-17 Aug-17 Oct-17 Dec-17 Feb-18 Apr-18 10 Base: All Respondents (n=1,004) 4. For each of the statements below, please indicate whether you agree or disagree with the statement.
  11. 11. Attitudes towards U.S. Participation in ICC - Trend 44 47 43 42 52 49 53 54 26 28 26 24 31 32 30 28 28 31 32 33 37 37 39 41 22 25 24 27 32 32 36 36 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 The US should continue to dedicate moderate resources to supporting some actions of the ICC without formally joining, such as by providing satellite photos if our satellites are passing an area of interest to the ICC Joining the ICC would compromise America's sovereignty as a nation The US should become more engaged and involved in the ICC without becoming a member by making all forms of our vast governmental resources available to support the work of the ICC The US should become a full member of the International Criminal Court and robustly support all of its work 11 Base: All Respondents (n=1,004) 4. For each of the statements below, please indicate whether you agree or disagree with the statement.
  12. 12. 5. In November 2017, the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Court (ICC) applied to open a formal investigation into war crimes and crimes against humanity that may have occurred during the recent conflicts in Afghanistan by the United States Armed Forces and the members of the CIA. This investigation may lead to criminal charges against members of the US Armed Forces and members if the CIA. How much, if at all, do you support this investigation? Support of ICC Investigating the USAF and the CIA 20% 25% 25% 28% 21% 20% 8% 7% 13% 16% 13% 5% Strongly support Somewhat support Neither support or oppose Somewhat oppose Strongly oppose Don't know All Adults 5 Base: All Respondents (n=1,004); All at least aware of ICC (n=489) Aware of ICC
  13. 13. 6. In November 2017, the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Court (ICC) applied to open a formal investigation into war crimes and crimes against humanity that may have occurred during the recent conflicts in Afghanistan by the Taliban and so-called Islamic State (IS/ISIS/ISIL). This investigation may lead to criminal charges against members of the Taliban and so-called Islamic State (IS/ISIS/ISIL). How much, if at all, do you support this investigation? Support of ICC Investigating the Taliban 42% 49% 26% 27% 15% 12% 2% 3% 4% 6% 12% 4% Strongly support Somewhat support Neither support or oppose Somewhat oppose Strongly oppose Don't know All Adults 5 Base: All Respondents (n=1,004); All at least aware of ICC (n=489) Aware of ICC
  14. 14. 7. Knowing that the ICC may charge members of the U.S. Armed Forces, the CIA, the Taliban and the so-called Islamic State (IS/ISIS/ISIL) with criminal charges following a formal investigation into war crimes and crimes against humanity, how does this information impact your opinion of the ICC? Support of ICC Investigating the Taliban 10%9% 11%9% 39%50% 21% 19% 17%13% All Adults 5 Base: All Respondents (n=1,004); All at least aware of ICC (n=489) Aware of ICC Much more favorable Somewhat more favorable Neither more nor less favorable Somewhat less favorable Much less favorable
  15. 15. Ipsos Contacts Clifford Young President, US Ipsos Public Affairs 2020 K Street, NW, Suite 410 Washington, DC 20006 Phone: +1 202.420.2016 Email: clifford.young@ipsos.com Julia Clark Senior Vice President 222 S Riverside Plaza, Fifth Floor Chicago, IL 60606 Phone: +1 312.526.4919 Email: julia.clark@ipsos.com

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