PDA and the University Press          AAUP 2012           Chicago       Joseph J. Esposito
What impact will patron-drivenacquisitions have on universitypress publishing and how canpresses best adapt to this new   ...
To answer this question, we need toknow . . . How many books do presses sell to libraries? How big is the market for PDA...
 No one really knows the answer to this Distinguish academic libraries from all other No two presses are alike Average...
 About 400-600 libraries have PDA systems today Growing rapidly; could double in 18 months Total volume: approximately ...
 By some estimates, 40% of books in academic  libraries never circulate (figure is sloppy but  useful) Books that do cir...
 PDA is mostly about ebooks; Amazon (for  libraries) is mostly about print Amazon is the largest library vendor nobody  ...
Amazon #2 Amazon is likely to seek a way to get ebooks    (Kindle) into libraries   An acquisition of a library vendor i...
 Some publishers believe PDA will hurt them, but  some publishers believe PDA will help them Libraries investing a great...
The intriguing thing about PDA is thatit encourages libraries to put manyrecords into their catalogs, morerecords than the...
 Publishers create metadata and send it to trading    partners   Publishers often work with ONIX vendors   Publishers g...
 Make metadata creation and distribution the #1    marketing priority (marketing is metadata)   Take control of ONIX fee...
 Replace ILL with PDA (collect fees on rentals) Price increases—inevitable Participate in digital book aggregations Mo...
 Joseph J. Esposito espositoj@gmail.com (831) 425-1143 +Joseph Esposito @josephjesposito http://scholarlykitchen.ssp...
AAUP 2012: PDA and the University Press (J. Esposito)
AAUP 2012: PDA and the University Press (J. Esposito)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

AAUP 2012: PDA and the University Press (J. Esposito)

1,759 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,759
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
725
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

AAUP 2012: PDA and the University Press (J. Esposito)

  1. 1. PDA and the University Press AAUP 2012 Chicago Joseph J. Esposito
  2. 2. What impact will patron-drivenacquisitions have on universitypress publishing and how canpresses best adapt to this new development?
  3. 3. To answer this question, we need toknow . . . How many books do presses sell to libraries? How big is the market for PDA? What will the PDA market look like in a few years? Are there structural changes coming for this marketplace? How can publishers stimulate sales within PDA? What new marketing is in order?
  4. 4.  No one really knows the answer to this Distinguish academic libraries from all other No two presses are alike Average library sales: 25% Other channels:  International: 10%  Course adoption: 25%  Amazon: 25% (and growing)  Other, including other bookstores: 15%
  5. 5.  About 400-600 libraries have PDA systems today Growing rapidly; could double in 18 months Total volume: approximately $20 million Publishers’ share: around $13 million University press total (25%): $3.25 million May be upward bias in the figures
  6. 6.  By some estimates, 40% of books in academic libraries never circulate (figure is sloppy but useful) Books that do circulate are not at risk with PDA— but payment for those books may be delayed Presses’ financial exposure = 40% of 25% of $320 million, or $32mm (not counting delayed payment) Challenge is for the libraries’ gain not to be the presses’ loss
  7. 7.  PDA is mostly about ebooks; Amazon (for libraries) is mostly about print Amazon is the largest library vendor nobody heard of Amazon’s growth for U. presses has multiple causes:  International reach of online venue  Course adoptions  Library sales  Sales to individuals (e.g., faculty)
  8. 8. Amazon #2 Amazon is likely to seek a way to get ebooks (Kindle) into libraries An acquisition of a library vendor is possible, including an acquisition of a PDA vendor This could restructure the marketplace Amazon’s growth means lower margins (Ironically, PDA is a better alternative)
  9. 9.  Some publishers believe PDA will hurt them, but some publishers believe PDA will help them Libraries investing a great deal of effort into developing these systems; they won’t go away PDA involves complex integration of multiple systems (catalog, billing, budget, etc.)
  10. 10. The intriguing thing about PDA is thatit encourages libraries to put manyrecords into their catalogs, morerecords than they would if they onlypurchased books outright. That’s theopportunity for publishers: augmentdiscovery and sales by influencingthe metadata that goes into the PDAcatalog.
  11. 11.  Publishers create metadata and send it to trading partners Publishers often work with ONIX vendors Publishers give metadata to Bowker, which charges users (including libraries) for it The quality and amount of metadata across the supply chain is uneven; often incorrect and incomplete PDA catalogs draw on this questionable metadata
  12. 12.  Make metadata creation and distribution the #1 marketing priority (marketing is metadata) Take control of ONIX feeds Make ONIX available for free directly from the publisher’s Web site Don’t cut off Bowker; complement them Establish library metadata advisory board Put as much care into metadata as you do to editorial work Goal: every library becomes a virtual “bookstore”
  13. 13.  Replace ILL with PDA (collect fees on rentals) Price increases—inevitable Participate in digital book aggregations Move business from low-margin Amazon to higher-margin PDA Use the library catalog as a basis for discovery (the metadata issue again) Explore a consortium to create bookstores within library catalogs (the Scholars Catalog project)
  14. 14.  Joseph J. Esposito espositoj@gmail.com (831) 425-1143 +Joseph Esposito @josephjesposito http://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org The research for this project was made possible with the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

×