Pp1 the geographical_setting_of_world_history_(16x9)

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Pp1 the geographical_setting_of_world_history_(16x9)

  1. 1. Outline: I. Weather and weather differences affect where and how humans live. II. The hot core of the earth has had many effects on the earth. III. The world is divided into three inhabitable landmasses. IV. The vast amounts of water in lakes, rivers, and oceans, has influenced human development. V. Topography has affected human development. VI. The distribution of natural resources has affected human development, especially in civilizations. VII. The varied availability of food–in both animal and plant form– has enabled human survival. VIII. Travel has led to the diffusion of power, ideas, diseases, products, and human behaviors. IX. Human cultures reflect the influence of the geographical settings in which they function. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  2. 2. Note: There are 3 alternate title slides. The first is simple. The second is a little goofy (changing when you click Enter). The third is like the second, but with a conventional double T in the word ‘setting’. Please delete two of the three, keeping only your preference, then delete this slide. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  3. 3. he g/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/f wo/rld histo/ry Ronald Wiltse May 2009 T a y t
  4. 4. he g/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/f wo/rld histo/ry T a y t Draft by Ronald Wiltse August 2008
  5. 5. The g/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/f wo/rld /histo/ry T a y Draft by Ronald Wiltse August 2008
  6. 6. I. Weather and weather differences affect where and how humans can live. A. The rotation of the earth, different amounts of solar heat absorption at different latitudes, and different rates of heat absorption of land and water cause weather. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  7. 7. I. Weather and weather differences affect where and how humans can live. B. The tilt of the earth causes seasons. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  8. 8. I. Weather and weather differences affect where and how humans can live. C. All things being equal, similar latitudes have similar weather. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  9. 9. I. Weather and weather differences affect where and how humans can live. D. The earth has periodically grown warmer and colder, with the polar regions being covered with ice and then uncovered. 1. The world’s oceans have risen and fallen with the change in the size of the polar ice caps. 2. Because most of the world’s land lies in the northern half of the world, the growth and decline of the southern polar ice cap have had little effect on human history, except on ocean levels. 3. We are in a period that is between a warm and a cold age. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  10. 10. Ocean level then Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry Note Florida and the Yucatan Great Britain and Ireland are part of Europe
  11. 11. Ocean level now Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  12. 12. Ocean level-global warming Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry Denmark is now under water.Florida is now under water.
  13. 13. I. Weather and weather differences affect where and how humans can live. E. The last time a big climate change occurred, an ice age resulted, not a warm age. 1. The average temperature of the earth was 9 ̊ colder than today. 2. Temperate climate belts moved southward, with tropical climates disappearing altogether. 3. Humans, by and large, followed the climate belts southward. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  14. 14. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry Lake Bonneville North America Lake Bonneville dried up, leaving behind the Bonneville Salt Flats.
  15. 15. Surviving the ice age Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  16. 16. II. The hot core of the earth has had many effects on the earth. A. It led to the creation of much of earth’s topography. 1. Plate movement created mountain ranges. 2. Molten magma erupting through the crust created single mountains. B. It features a magnetic field that makes compasses possible. C. It protects our atmosphere by diverting solar radiation that would otherwise strip the earth of its atmosphere. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  17. 17. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  18. 18. III. The world is divided into three habitable landmasses. A. Afro-Eurasia is the largest, and apparently where humans originated. B. America is the middle-sized continent. C. Australia is the smallest. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  19. 19. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  20. 20. IV. The vast amounts of water in lakes, rivers, and oceans, have influenced human development. A. Lakes, rivers, and oceans created first barriers to travel, then paths. 1. Until the development of paved roads, water travel was always easier than land travel. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry Woven boat on lake Titicaca in the Andes
  21. 21. IV. The vast amounts of water in lakes, rivers, and oceans, has influenced human development. B. Bodies of water have provided drinking water and food. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  22. 22. V. Topography has affected human development. A. Mountains acted as barriers to trade, travel, and, often, cultures. 1. Mountain ranges provided natural boundaries between groups of people. B. Valleys have provided natural routes for water. 1. Being flat, valleys provide good farmland and roads. 2. Where necessary, rivers can provide irrigation, either directly, or with canals fed by the river. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  23. 23. VI. The distribution of natural resources has affected human development, especially in civilizations. A. Different cultures have used or ignored various resources. B. Countries with many resources–and who have used them–have had advantages over countries with fewer resources. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  24. 24. VII. The varied availability of food–in both animal and plant form–has enabled human survival. A. Coastal cultures have often looked to the sea for food. B. Some cultures have limited their food to a narrow range of options while others have eaten just about anything available. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  25. 25. VIII. Travel has led to the diffusion of power, ideas, diseases, products, and human behaviors. A. Empire builders have built roads to enable their soldiers to travel easily to all parts of their empires. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry Carthaginian general Hannibal crossing the Alps to attack the Romans
  26. 26. VIII. Travel has led to the diffusion of power, ideas, diseases, products, and human behaviors. B. Interaction between two areas over a long period of time has enabled each group to become accustomed to the other’s diseases, transforming severe diseases into less dangerous childhood ones. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  27. 27. VIII. Travel has led to the diffusion of power, ideas, diseases, products, and human behaviors. C. The Colombian Exchange is only the best-known of many diffusions. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  28. 28. VIII. Travel has led to the diffusion of power, ideas, diseases, products, and human behaviors. D. Dwellers in the Afro-Eurasian landmass came to use the horse to aid transportation. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  29. 29. VIII. Travel has led to the diffusion of power, ideas, diseases, products, and human behaviors. E. Wherever lakes and oceans bordered human settlements, boats have aided travel. 1. Boats with sails and rowers can move in any direction, no matter what the wind is doing (but rowing take more work). Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry Wind must be mostly behind a ship with this kind of sail.
  30. 30. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  31. 31. VIII. Travel has led to the diffusion of power, ideas, diseases, products, and human behaviors. E. Wherever lakes and oceans bordered human settlements, boats have aided travel. 2. From the 15th century on sailing ships could move in almost any direction, no matter where the wind is blowing. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry old sail system new sail system
  32. 32. VIII. Travel has led to the diffusion of power, ideas, diseases, products, and human behaviors. E. Wherever lakes and oceans bordered human settlements, boats have aided travel. 2. From the 15th century on sailing ships could move in almost any direction, no matter where the wind is blowing. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry old sail system new sail system
  33. 33. VIII. Travel has led to the diffusion of power, ideas, diseases, products, and human behaviors. F. Modern wealth and technology has made travel fast, comfortable, and available to all but the poorest. 1. Public transportation and the automobile have enabled even local movement far beyond what was traditionally possible. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  34. 34. IX. Human cultures reflect the influence of the geographical settings in which they function. A. Unlike other animals, humans can live anywhere on the planet, given enough wealth and technology. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry
  35. 35. IX. Human cultures reflect the influence of the geographical settings in which they function. B. Ways of life reflect the environment, although wealth and advanced technology can overcome this. 1. Food and clothing reflect the environment. 2. Shelter and occupations reflect the environment. a. American housing since World War II often ignores the environment, using heating and air conditioning to do so. 3. Even language and ideas reflect the environment. Theg/eog/raphi/cal s/etti/ng o/fwo/rldhisto/ry

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